Skip to main content

Full text of "Report"

See other formats


EIGHTY-EIGHTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 

TATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF MARYLAND 



Digitized 


by the Internet Archive 






i 


in 2013 







http://archive.org/details/report00mary_82 

DO EOT CIW""!- 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

vm^ ; State Board of Education, 

SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1954 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



if 



MARYLAND DIRECTORY 

OF 

SCHOOL OFFICIALS, JUNE 1954 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



Name Address Term Expires 

Wendell D. Allen, President Baltimore 1956 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., Vice-president Federalsburg 1957 

William A. Gunter Cumberland 1960 

Dwight O. W. Holmea Baltimore. . .' 1958 

Richard Marcus Pikesville 1959 

Mrs. Garvin Tankersley Betheada 1961 

Mrs. Curtis Walker Chevy Chase 1955 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR. 
State Superintendent of Schools 

Name Position 

John J. Seidel Assistant State Superintendent for Vocational Education 

D. W. Zimmerman Assistant State Superintendent in Finance and Research 

Merle S. Bateman Director of Certification and Accreditation 

James E. Spitznas Director of Instruction 

Helen M. Clark Director of Library Extension 

R. C. Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

James L. Reid Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

*F. J. Thuman Consultant Architect 

Helen D. George Editor 

Ruth E. Hobbs Administrative Assistant 

Margaret E. Albaugh Stenographer-Secretary 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Suzanne Ness Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Corinne D. Combs Senior Typist 

Margaret Paton Senior Typist 

Mrs. Wilda R. Taylor Telephone Operator 

Lloyd E. Holmes Duplicating Machine Operator II 



Division of Vocational Education John J. Seidel, Assistant Superintendent 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Elisabeth Amery Supervisor of Home Economics 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Herschel M. James Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

George A. Myers Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Joseph S. Endslow Assistant Supervisor of Veterans On-the-Farm Training Program 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor for Veterans On-the-Job Training Program 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Senior Stenographer 

Margaret C. Brooks Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Hazel B. Wilkerson Senior Stenographer 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Virginia C. Cooper Senior Typist 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 



Division of Finance and Research — D. W. Zimmerman, Assistant Superintendent 

William S. Sartorius Assistant Director 

William L. Barall Supervisor of Finance 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

C. William Anthony Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Charles D. Baer Auditor 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Statistician I 

Mrs. Verda K. McClow Statistician II 

Mary E. McNeill Statistician II 

Mrs. Grace Steele Travers Principal Account Clerk I 

Minnie Gerber Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk II 

Blanche E. Keen Principal Account Clerk II 

Helen Ellis Stenographer-Secretary 

* Part time 



Name Position 

Carrye Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Dorothy E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

D. Joan Walterhoefer Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Laura M. Gaither Report Typist 

Margaret Jacobs Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Marie Wollschlager Koy Punch Operator 

Division of Certification and Accreditation — Merle S. Bateman, Director 

W. Theodore Boston Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education and Assistant Director 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

Charles C. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Accreditation 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Accreditation 

Elsie F. Forman Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Marilyn Frank Senior Stenographer 

Gloria M. Korsch Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Doris Van Cleaf Senior Clerk 

Division of Instruction — James E. Spitznas, Director 

Mrs. Grace Alder Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Paul E. Hurfiington Supervisor of High Schools 

Willis H. White Supervisor of High Schools 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

Dorothy W. Shires Supervisor of Pupil Personnel and Parent Education 

Mrs. Geneva Ely Flickinger Supervisor of Special Education 

Ethel E. Sammis Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

E. Drusilla Chairs Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger .Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Constance Fish Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Alma D. Maenner Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part-time) Senior Stenographer 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — R. C. Thompson, Director 

STATE OFFICE 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Services 

W. Bird Terwilliger Supervisor of Guidance Training and Placement 

George W. Keller Assistant Supervisor of Service? for the Blind 

*Dean W. Roberts, M.D Medical Consultant 

Kathleen E. Scheve Stenographer-Secretary 

Anne Nusinov Principal Stenographer 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Principal Stenographer 

Doris P. Nolan Senior Stenographer 

BALTIMORE CITY OFFICE 
2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr Counselor 

Foy L. Lunsford Counselor 

Irwin D. Medinger Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor 

H. Smith Shumway Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

Carroll L. Speck Counselor 

Emma Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Claire Scully Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Ruth Friedland Senior Stenographer 

Betty May Kline Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bonnie W. Wallace Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive Mayo Receptionist 

CENTRAL MARYLAND BRANCH 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Myrtle E. Chell Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

Ben W. Barker Counselor 

James S. Dashiell Counselor 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor 

Harold Hayes Counselor 

Fedon Nides Counselor 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Swisher Counselor 

Mrs. Garmilla V. Janata Senior Stenographer 

Beverly J. Sheain Senior Stenographer 

Bell Sklar Senior Stenographer 

* Part time 

3 



Name Position 
EASTERN SHORE BRANCH 
117 Calvert Building, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor 

Robert L. Burton Counselor 

Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor, Board of Education, Chestertown 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND BRANCH 
4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant SuDervisor 

IT. Dorsey Devlin Counselor 

Carroll Walsh Counselor, Board of Education, Rockville 

Mrs. Jane J. Hoffman Senior Stenographer 

WESTERN MARYLAND BRANCH 

122 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

Kenneth G. Stoner Assistant Supervisor 

J. Leo Delanev Counselor, 111 Union Street. Cumberland 

William C. Hill Counselor, 115 E. Church Street. Frederick 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

Division of Library Extension — Helen M. Clark, Director 
400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Mae Graham Supervisor of School and Children's Libraries 

Nettie B. Taylor Supervisor of County and Institutional Libraries 

Mrs. Julia N. Larkin Readers' Counselor 

Harry E. Foster Technical Counselor 

M. E. Naomi Johnson Associate Librarian 

Josephine M. Baldwin Assi^ant I ibrarian 

Mrs. Suzanne V. Pearce Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Beverly M. Burmeister Lil)--ary Assistant 

Doris I-. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Johann Nizer Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Martha Keydash Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Joyce Reece Senior Typist 

Regina Herrmann Junior Typist 

Aydelotte L. Meister Junior Clerk 

Louis E. Myers Porter 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND— JUNE 1954 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Cumberland Free Public Library Mary G. Walsh 

La Vale Public Library Mrs. Richard Heacox 

Western port Public Library Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas 

Anne Arundel Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library. 

Annapolis Esther King 

Kuethe Library, Glen Burnie Helen Zeman 

Baltimore City Enoch Pratt Free Library Amy Winslow 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnich 

Calvert Calvert County Public Free Library, 

Prince Frederick Mrs. William W. Duke 

Caroline Denton Public Library Mrs. Marie Armstrong 

Federalsburg Community Library Mrs. Carolyn G. Noble 

Ridgely Community Library Mrs. Paul Hoffman 

Carroll Davis Library, Westminster Mrs. Helen Rex Shroyer 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Cecilton Community Library Mrs. Ernest Mann 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Doris Holmes 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Hurlock Free Public Library Hope S. Barber 

Vienna Public Library Mrs. Alan Webb 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Emmitsburg Public Library Louise Sebold 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, Oakland Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Mrs. Dorothy Glackin 

Havre de Grace Public Library Mrs. Roswell Poplar 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Chestertown Public Library Cornelia Davis 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Rockville Public Library Mrs. Rose C. Miller 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Mrs. Mary Kenan Hadley 

Greenbelt Public Library Mrs. Marjorie A. Muir 

Queen Anne's Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 

Leonardtown Eloise Pickrell 



4 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND— Continued 

County Library Librarian 

Somerset Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield Mrs. Gladys Daugherty 

Princess Anne Public Library Mrs. J. Randolph Field 

Vaughn Hoffman Memorial Library, 

Rhodes Point Mrs. Doris Springs 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. David S. Stewart 

Washington Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown Mrs. Mary Louise Holzafel 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Berlin Public Library Mary Bailey 

Pocomoke City Public Library Mrs. J. Powell Eaton 

Snow Hill Public Library Mrs. Paul C. Kenney 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

Lillian C. Compton, Acting Frostburg Miles W. Connor Coppin, Baltimore-17 

J. D. Blackwell Salisbury 

MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICE STAFF 
31 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Name Position 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice-chairman State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County 

J. Millard Tawos State Comptroller 

Willis H. White Supervisor of High Schools, State Department of Education 

John P. Mannion Director 

C Christis Accountant 

Minnie M. Hamilton Administrative Assistant 

Helen M. Kirkman Principal Clerk 

Mrs. Aneta Richardson Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Audrey Beere Accounting Machine Operator 

Grace R. Perry Senior Typist 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Senior Clerk 

MARYLAND COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFFS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 

Cumberland 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Supervisor of Secondary Education and Assistant Superintendent 

William P. Cooper Director of Cafeterias 

Lewyn C. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Arthur G. Ramey Supervisor of Physical Education and Transportation 

Jane E. Botsford Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Winifred Greene Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison Supervisor of Elementary Education 

W. Valgene Routch Supervisor of Music Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 

Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Administrative Assistant 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent, Administrative 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Powers Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr 'Supervisor of Transportation 

Leonard Johnson Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Howard A. Kinhart Assistant Superintendent, Senior High Schools 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent, Elementary and Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Slater W. Bryant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Doris M. Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Frank C. Gunderloy Supervisor of Vocational and Technical Education 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Personnel 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Ellen T. Elliott Supervisor of Personnel Procurement 

Mrs. Ruth J. McNelly Supervisor of Finance and Certification 

5 



Name Potrilion 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 
Towson 
(1) Sparrows Point 

Edward G. Stapleton Superintendent of Schools 

James A. Sensenbaugh Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

James B. O'Toole, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde C. Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Myrtle S. Eckhardt Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Jennie E. Jessop Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anna G. Shepperd Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

(1) Mrs. Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Wylda F. Benson Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean C. Sisk . .Supervisor of High Schools 

*Minnie H. Woolford Supervisor of Colored High Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Business and Adult Education 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Service 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

Ralph E. Kessler Supervisor of Special Education 

N. Harry Camp, Jr Director of Clinical Services 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ruthetta Lippy Supervisor of School Lunch Service 

Walter M. Gordon Supervisor of Transportation 

William T. Willis, Jr t Assistant Superintendent in Business Operations 

William C. Feader ' Supervisor of Accounting 

HerdS. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Maintenance 

Tan Gordon Supervisor of Plant Operation 

CALVERT COUNTY 
Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

CAROLINE COUNTY 
Denton 

W. Stewart Fitzgerald Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. Usilton Supervisor of High Schools 

Beatrice Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Lula D. Ward Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

James P. Hill Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



CARROLL COUNTY 

Westminster 



Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent ofTSchools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Gerald E. Richter Supervisor of High 'Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

*Philip Royer Supervisor of Music 

•Mae E. Prince Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

CECIL COUNTY 
Elkton 

Morris W. Rannels Superintendent of Schools 

E. B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Olive L. Reynolds Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel F. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Edwin H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

* Part time 



6 



Nam* Position 
CHARLES COUNTY 
La Plata 

T. Carlyle Martin Su peri ntPn dent of Schools 

B. Lucile Bowie Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Joseph C. Parks Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of Colored High Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



DORCHESTER COUNTY 

Cambridge 



James G. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Albert S. Farver Supervisor of High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



FREDERICK COUNTY 
Frederick 

Eugene W. Pruitt Superintendent of Schools 

Duval W. Sweadner Supervisor of High Schools 

A. Drucilla Worthington Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson SuDervisor of Elementary Schools 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Health and Physical Education 

Ruth MacVean Supervisor of School T unch Program 

Paul L. Hoff master Supervisor of Transportation 

*Charles E. Henson, 127 S. Bentz Street, Frederick Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Gertrude Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT COUNTY 
Oakland 

R.'Bowen Hardesty Superintendent of Schools 

Foster D. Bittle Supervisor of Sr.- Jr. High Schools 

John M. Dunn Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

John L. Fitzwater Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD COUNTY 
Bel Air 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Benjamin S. Carroll Assistant Superintendent 

Hazel X,. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Anne M. Noonan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Howard B. Peters Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

C. Clark Jones Supervisor of High Schools 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 

♦Earle B. Wagner Administrative Assistant 

Allen B. Amoss Administrative Assistant 



HOWARD COUNTY 
Ellicott City 



John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Carmen C. Delaplane Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

♦Morris L. Woodson Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



KENT COUNTY 

Chestortown 



Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine.Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



Rock ville 

Forbes H. Norris Superintendent of Schools 

James L. Prince Assistant Superintendent, Personnel and Administration 

Thomas W. Pyle Assistant Superintendent, Instructional Program 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor, High Schools 

Mrs. Helen P. Bready Supervisor, High Schools 

Marian L. Schwartz Supervisor, High Schools 

* Part time 



7 



Name 



Position 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY-(Contlnued) 

Harold Tt. Packard Supervisor, High Schools 

Ethelcen Daniel Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Agn^s M. Drewry Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

William P. Evans Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

Lillian L. Core Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruth S. Gue Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

♦Mrs. Margaret T. Jones Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

John M. King Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

Elsie Schurter Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

Clara G. Stratemeyer Supervisor, Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Louise S. Walker Supervisor, Audio- Visual Education 

Mrs. Marjorie B. St. Clair Supervisor of Art 

William C. Feddeman Supervisor, Industrial Education and Adult Education 

Charles T Horn Supervisor of Music 

Julia W. Watkins Supervisor of Home Arts 

Crescent J Bride Supervisor of Physical Education 

Alice Robinson Supervisor of Library Services 

Brian M. Benson Director of Finance 

Frank St. Clair, Jr Director of Supporting Services 

Mrs. Corelli David Supervisor of School Lunch 

Richard Ream Supervisor of Transportation 

Maxv ell E. Burdette Director of Research and Testing 

T. H. Owen Knight Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Marian T. Tannhauser Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Alice Nicewarner Director of Personnel and Statistics 

Otho Hawke Director of Maintenance 

Albert Rogers Director of Custodial Services 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Director of Instruction 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Suoervisor of Transportation 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lucile L. Lurry Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Dean Manifold Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Emma Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Fducation 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anne Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Rita Donovan Supervisor of Flementary Education 

Elisabeth Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine T. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art 

Mrs. Frances Hill Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education 

Vincent Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mrs. Louise Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Education 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economic? and Adult Education 

Doswell E. Brooks Supervisor of Colored Schools 

William W. Hall Assistant Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Marian E. Lohdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Services 



QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 

Centreville 



Harry C. Rhodes Superintendent of Schools 

Carter M. Hickman Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Supervisor of White Elementary Schools 

Alberta C. Browne Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
Leonardtown 

Lettie M. Dent Superintendent of Schools 

E. Violette Young Supervisor, White Elementary Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor, High Schools 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor, Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Margaret H. Burch Supervisor, School Lunch Program 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

* Part time 

8 



Nam* Position 
SOMERSET COUNTY 
Princess Anne 

C. Allen Carlson Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp Supervisor of Elementary Education 

John L. Bond Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Kermit A. Cottman Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

TALBOT COUNTY 
Easton 

J. Willard Davis Superintendent of Schools 

M. Lillian Cheezum Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

♦Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia G. D. Darrow Supervisor of Pupi' Personnel 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 
Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

C. Paul Barnhart Administrative Assistant 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Director of Instruction 

Carl R. Beer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Rebekah B. Stonebraker Supervisor of High Schools 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

Miriam L. HofTman Supervisor of Music 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Industrial and Adult Education 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Russel' L. Kepler Supervisor of Maintenance 

V. Richard Martin Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Finance 

WICOMICO COUNTY 

Salisbury 

James M. Bennett Superintendent of Schools 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Helen C. Wootton Supervisor of High Schools 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

BrancheJH. Phillips, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 



WORCESTER COUNTY 
Snow Hill 



Paul D. Cooper Superintendent of Schools 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of Instruction 

Paul S. Hyde Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Maintenance and Transportation 

Mrs. Lucy S. Pilchard Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



BALTIMORE CITY 

3 East Twenty-fifth Street, Baltimore 18 



John H. Fischer Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent Business Management 

Edwin Stein Assistant Superintendent General Administration 

Charles W. Sylvester Assistant Superintendent Vocational Education 

J. Carey Taylor Assistant Superintendent Secondary Education 

Helen M. Stegman Administrative Assistant 

Thomas A. Van Sant Director of Adult Education 

Leon L. Winslow Director of Art Education 

George F. Smith, Jr Director of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Health and Physical Education 

Kenneth Hjelmervik Director of Music 

W. A. Maccubbin Director of Personnel 

Angela Broening Director of Publications 

Lome Woollatt Director of Research 

William E. Lehr Director of School Facilities 

Harry F. Latshaw Director of Special Education 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services to Pupils 

Helen Herman Area Director 

* Part time 



9 



Name Position 
BALTIMORE CITY-(Continued) 

Marion Johnson Area Director 

E. Romaine Jones Area Director 

Eleanor Shank Area Director 

Laura M. Wdls Area Director 

Albert G. Packard Assistant Director of Aptitude Testing 

Harry Bard Assistant Director of Curriculum Bureau 

Leona C. Buchwald Assistant Director of Guidance and Placement 

Harold B. Chapman Assistant Director of Research 

William M. K. Rawlings Supervisor of Adult Education 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor of Audio-visual Education 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor of Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

H. Spilman Burns Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

D wight S. Caskey Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Sol Levin Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Mrs. Emma G. Bright Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Rebecca E. Carroll Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

M. Catherine Cohee Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Elizabeth Fox Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Elizabeth Gilpin Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Thelma D. Jackson Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Winifred T. Kinn Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Lillian W. Stevenson Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Josephine T. Toro Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Virginia H. Young Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Helen Chambers Supervisor of English 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English 

Helen Mixter Supervisor of Geography 

Robert Diggs Supervisor of Geography and Science 

Beulah P. Beale Supervisor of Handwriting 

Mrs. Lillian B. Davis Supervisor of Health Education 

D. C. Wharton Smith, M.D Supervisor of Health Services 

Mrs. Edythe A. Myers Supervisor of History 

Nellie S. Buckey Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts Education 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music 

Anne L. Barlage Supervisor of Latin 

Marion B. Wiese Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Nanette R. Blackiston Supervisor of Mathematics 

Grover W. Norris Supervisor of Mathematics 

Samuel L. Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics 

Otto K. Schmied Supervisor of Modern Languages 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Occupational and Shop Centers 

Mrs. Katherine Whiteside Taylor Supervisor of Parent Education 

Andrew T. Norgan Supervisor of Physical Education 

C. Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Work 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science 

Alexina Stidham Supervisor of Science 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education 

Marguerite L. Stem Supervisor of Special Education 

Olive A. Whildin Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sarah I. S. Williams Supervisor of Special Education 

James O. Proctor Supervisor of Vocational Education 

William J. Hucksoll Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 

Karl H. Young Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 



10 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 12 

Legislation Affecting Education 13 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 15 

State Superintendent's Statement 25 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Certification and Accreditation 30 

Instruction 36 

Library Extension 48 

Vocational Rehabilitation 54 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 58 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools 59 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 60 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools for Atypical Children 64 

Births in Maryland 67 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 70 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 71 

Grade Enrollment 72 

Nonpromotions in Elementary Schools 78 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 80 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject 88 

High School Teachers 90 

Enrollment in Individual Subjects 91 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 104 

Teachers: by Summer School Attendance, Certification, Preparation, 

Resignations, Turnover, Source 110 

Number and Size of Schools 128 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 135 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 136 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 140 

Cost per Pupil 142 

Average Salaries 148 

Salaries 152 

Transportation 154 

Adult Education; Vocational Education 159 

School Lunch 166 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 168 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 172 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 178 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 180 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 181 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 189 

Parent-Teacher Associations 190 

Baltimore City Summer Schools; High School Equivalence 191 

Vocational Rehabilitation 192 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 194 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 197 

Index 246 



11 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1955 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor McKeldin: 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the eighty-eighth 
"annual report covering all operations of the State department of 
education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of educa- 
tion throughout the State" for the period beginning July 1, 1953 
and ending June 30, 1954. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



12 



Maryland State Department of Education 



13 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 
Regular Session — January, 1954 
Public Meetings of Public Bodies 

Chapter 13, Senate Bill 31, of the Laws of 1954, requires all regular and special 
meetings of the legislative body of every municipal corporation in Maryland, 
of the county commissioners of any county, and of every board or com- 
mission within the Executive Branch of the Government to be open to the 
public at all times. This means that all meetings of all Maryland school 
boards must now be public meetings. Although the bill permits the holding 
of executive sessions, it prohibits any final action being taken in such sessions. 
Effective date is June 1, 1954. 

County Superintendents' Salary Bill 

Chapter 27, Senate Bill 18, of the Laws of 1954, amends Section 142 of Article 77 
of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 edition) to provide for an increase 
in the minimum salaries of all county superintendents of schools. The be- 
ginning minimum salary for superintendents has been increased from $5,000 
or $5,500 to $8,000. For each additional year of service an annual increment 
of $400 is stipulated, up to a maximum of $10,000 per year. The former 
maximum salary was $7,500. This law also eliminates a provision of the form- 
er law which related the amount of salary to the number of teachers em- 
ployed in the county. An amendment to the bill requires the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools to submit reasons in writing to the county board of 
education should he fail to approve the apointment of a county superintendent 
of schools. Effective date of this bill is July 1, 1954. 

[A county board of education may pay to a county superintendent an annual 
salary in excess of the minimum salary schedule.] 

General Construction Loan of 1954 

Chapter 45, House Bill 16, of the Laws of 1954, authorizes the creation of a State 
debt of $7,864,600 the proceeds of which will be used to construct, equip, 
and acquire land for certain necessary buildings of the State. The State 
Teachers Colleges building programs are included in this bill. Following 
are the total amounts allotted to each of the colleges: 

Bowie $296,000 Salisbury $243,750 

Frostburg 496,500 Towson 585,500 

Tax Exemptions and Equalization Calculations 

Chapter 66, Senate Bill 74, of the Laws of 1954, repeals and re-enacts with amend- 
ments, Section 209A of Article 77, to provide that if the local political sub- 
division reduces the assessable property total through special tax exemptions, 
such exemptions shall be allowed in making Equalization and Incentive Fund 
calculations. Under the provision of this law additional levies are not 
required for such exemptions in order to participate in Equalization and 
Incentive Funds. The effective date of this bill is June 1, 1954. 

Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 

Chapter 67, Senate Bill 76, of the Laws of 1954, provides for supplementary 
payments to all retired public school teachers who are now receiving less than 
$900 per year. In effect, the bill merely makes $900 per year the minimum 
retirement benefit payable to all qualified retired public school teachers. 
This measure does not become effective until July 1, 1955. 
[A county board of education may pay to a retired teacher an annual sum in 
excess of the minimum set by law.] 

Extension of Time for Transfer between Retirement Systems 
Chapter 82, House Bill 108, of the Laws of 1954, grants an extension of time to 
those persons who are currently members of a City or State retirement sys- 
tem but who have not yet requested the transfer of previous retirement credit 
earned in one or the other of such systems. The final date for effecting a 
transfer of credit is now December 1, 1954. 



14 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



Workmen's Compensation for Public School Employees 

Chapter 83, House Bill 119, of the Laws of 1954, places all county and City 
Board of Education employees and all public school employees under the 
provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Laws. Effective date is June 1, 
1954. 

Safety Regulations for Schools 

Senate Resolution 3 requests the Legislative Council to study the formulation 
of a set of uniform safety regulations for schools and school children. 

Federal Aid for Impacted Areas 

House Resolution 13 requests the Congress of the United States to continue to 
provide funds for school construction and current school expenses in localities 
abnormally affected by enrollment increases due to Federally-connected 
children. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



15 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD 
OF EDUCATION 

August 26, 1953 

Mr. William A. Gunter, a former president of the Allegany 
County Board of Education, was welcomed as a new member of the 
State Board of Education. 

The Board approved the tentative State Budget subject to 
revision which might be necessary because of changes in the assessed 
valuation. Each of the three parts of the State budget (State De- 
partment, Teachers Colleges, and Public Schools) had earlier been 
studied by three committees of the Board. 

Following a report by two members of the Board on the appro- 
priation for food at the State Teachers Colleges the Board passed 
the following resolution: 

Resolution 

The Board is desirous that an adequate and nutritious diet be pro- 
vided for all the students at the State Teachers Colleges. It feels that 
the cost of an adequate diet can be determined only by a scientific 
study. The State Superintendent is, therefore, directed to have such a 
study made as soon as possible and to revise the tentative estimate for 
food in the budget by much amounts as the proposed study may indicate 
as desirable and adequate and as approved by the Board. 

Dr. John J. Seidel, chairman of Committee to Study Teacher 
Preparation, reported briefly on the study on teacher supply and 
teacher preparation in Maryland. The report embodied five pro- 
posals for immediate adoption and four for later action. 

Acting on the first proposal, the Board passed a motion that 
because of the critical need for elementary and secondary school 
teachers during at least the next decade, Maryland institutions of 
higher learning which, by agreement, have confined their teacher 
preparation to the secondary field, or which have offered no courses 
in education, should be given an opportunity to prepare teachers for 
Maryland public elementary schools, if the institutions so desire and 
if their programs are approved by the State Superintendent. 

The second proposal in the report is that the State Department 
include on its staff a person to assist in developing and promoting 
an active program of recruiting personnel for the teaching profession. 
It is thought that for the time being, perhaps, the Supervisor of 
Teacher and Higher Education may be able to handle this work. 

The State Superintendent requested the Board to study the 
report and to take action later on the other proposals. 

The Board authorized the State Superintendent to present to the 
Board of Public Works a report on possible transfer of quarters of 
the State Department of Education. The report gives the results 
of a detailed study of the work of the Department and its relative 
effectiveness with headquarters in Baltimore and in Annapolis and 
recommends without qualification that the offices not be moved to 
Annapolis. 



16 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



The committee consisted of Mr. William S. Sartorius, chairman; 
Dr. David W. Zimmerman, Dr. John J. Seidel, Mr. Robert C. 
Thompson, and Mr. C. William Anthony. 

The Board passed the following resolution on Dr. Anita S. 
Dowell, Dean of the State Teachers College at Towson, who is re- 
tiring as of the last of August, 1953: 

Resolution on Dr. Anita S. Dowell 

Upon the occasion of the retirement of Dr. Anita S. Dowell, Dean 
of the State Teachers College at Towson, Maryland, the Board wishes to 
express its appreciation of her long and distinguished service at the 
institution. 

A graduate of Goucher College, with a master's degree from 
Teachers College, Columbia University, Dr. Dowell earned her doctorate 
at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. 
Her academic career was enriched by study under several scholarships in 
biology and health education — scholarships at the Marine Biological 
Station at Woods Hole, Mass., at the University of California, Berkeley, 
and a five-month's travel fellowship which she won in a national com- 
petition sponsored by the American Child Health Association and 
which enabled her to study health education throughout Europe. She 
was elected to several academic and professional honor societies and, 
while serving as national vice-president of Pi Lambda Theta, had the 
opportunity of visiting colleges throughout the United States. Rec- 
ognition as an authority on health education resulted in her being in- 
vited to teach summer school at institutions in Oregon, Florida, and 
New Jersey, and to supervise health education at the Horace Mann 
School, Teachers College, Columbia University. These experiences 
helped constantly to increase her effectiveness in the classroom at Towson. 

Dr. Dowell began teaching in the State Normal School in Baltimore 
a few years after her graduation from Goucher College and after ex- 
perience as a private and a public school teacher in Calvert County. 
Within a short time the Normal School moved to its present location in 
Towson and later became a four-year Teachers College. Dr. Dowell was 
appointed Assistant to the Principal, then Assistant to the President, 
and more recently Dean of the College, and in these capacities served 
under three presidents. She assumed many responsibilities and exerted 
a strong influence on the development of the College. She not only 
taught with enthusiasm and skill but had charge of the College during 
the absences of the President, once directed the summer school, planned 
and administered the guidance program, and was the valued confidante 
and friend of many of the faculty as well as of the students. She was 
both a creative and stabilizing influence at the College. 

The Board has learned with regret of the decision of Dr. Dowell to 
retire and hopes that she will have many years of happy leisure. 

Mr. T. Hofmann Clift was appointed Supervisor of Finance 
effective August 13, 1953. Mr. Clift had previously held the 
position of Auditor in the State Department of Education. 



November 30, 1953 

Mr. Richard Marcus of Baltimore City was welcomed as a new 
member of the State Board of Education. 

The Board gave final approval to By-law 73— Extension to 
1955 as follows: 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



In view of the shortage of qualified elementary school teachers during 
the school years 1953-55, Junior High School Teachers' Certificates 
shall be valid for teaching in the elementary schools. Teachers holding 
such certificates who continue to teach in the elementary grades shall 
qualify for Bachelor of Science Certificates in Elementary Education 
within six years of the date of appointment. 

The State Superintendent reminded the Board that the Legisla- 
ture had passed a law in 1951 forbidding the use of Vocational 
Rehabilitation records as evidence in civil proceedings before any 
commission, administrative body, or court. Nevertheless, when an 
attorney requested permission recently to review one of the case 
folders in Vocational Rehabilitation, for the purpose of securing 
material to use in a suit he was filing on behalf of a disabled person, 
the Attorney General's office instructed the State Superintendent to 
make the folder available to the attorney, with the understanding 
that no part of the material contained therein could be used as 
evidence in any court. The opinion of the Attorney General's 
office was that the case folder is State property and therefore subject 
to review by any citizen who cares to see it. The State Superin- 
tendent stated that if additional similar requests were received, each 
of them would be referred to the Attorney General. 

In answer to a letter to the Governor on the request of the State 
Board of Education that its offices continue in Baltimore, the 
Governor answered in part as follows: 

"I assure you that the views of the Board of Education will be 
given the fullest consideration before final determination is made. Mean- 
while, I am taking the liberty of forwarding your report to the attention 
of Mr. Albert P. Backhaus, Secretary of the State Office Building Com- 
mission, for his information." 

The President of the Board expressed his concern over the failure 
of the State Planning Commission to recommend for construction 
several buildings which have been requested. These additional 
quarters are necessary if the Teachers Colleges are to function 
effectively in providing teachers for the thirty-three per cent increase 
in public school enrollment which is expected within a period of five 
years. He was particularly concerned that no provision was made 
for the auditorium-gymnasium at Coppin State Teachers College. 

Approval was given for a committee of the State Board of Edu- 
cation to be appointed to confer with the State Planning Commission 
on the entire Capital Improvements Program at the State Teachers 
Colleges. 

The State Superintendent reported on the findings of a com- 
mittee on diet and diet costs at the State Teachers Colleges. A 
committee consisting of Mrs. Ernestine Becker McCollum, a leading 
authority on nutrition and Assistant Professor in the School of 
Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University; Miss Eleanor 
G. Weagly, State Supervisor of School Lunch Program; and Miss 
Anne R. Matthews, Chief Nutritionist, State Department of Health, 
made a study of diet needs which were converted into costs by ac- 
countants in the State Department of Education. 



1 8 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



February 24, 1954 

Dr. Geneva E. Flickinger, State Supervisor of Special Educa- 
tion, reprted to the Board on the Special Education program in 
Maryland, stating that consideration is being given to providing a 
few special classes on a county regional basis. These classes would 
be located near the border of one county and would be available to 
handicapped children in the adjoining county. 

The Board confirmed its previous approval that State aid may 
be allowed on a minimum of seven handicapped children per teacher. 
It also adopted the regulations as a whole entitled "Standards, Rules, 
and Regulations Governing the Provision of Special Programs for 
Handicapped Children Who Are Residents of Maryland." 

The Board's attention was called to the Twenty-fifth Anni- 
versary of the signing by Governor Ritchie of the act providing for 
the Vocational Rehabilitation Program in Maryland. An anni- 
versary dinner commemorating this event was also announced, with 
Senator Charles E. Potter, a double amputee, as the speaker. 

The Board approved tentative standards to be used as the 
basis for approval of Maryland institutions of higher learning which 
plan to offer programs leading to certification to teach in the public 
elementary and or secondary schools. The approval of the Board 
was given with the understanding that the standards would be edited 
and shortened. 

Mr. James M. Bennett, Superintendent of Schools, Wicomico 
County, explained the wishes of the superintendents regarding a re- 
vision of By-law 75 to postpone the effective date to September 1, 
1955, in order to avoid the loss of some of the emergency teachers. 
The Board approved By-law 75 with this change and with an added 
provision to allow a two-year period in which to earn the credits 
necessary to classify an emergency certificate as first class. 

By-law 75 

Under the authority of Section 100 of Article 77 of the Annotated 
Code of Maryland (1951 edition), the County Superintendents are in- 
structed to rate emergency certificates as first class only when the 
applicant, in addition to meeting the other requirements heretofore made, 
has presented plans for an approved program of study leading to a 
regular certificate and has worked toward the completion of this program 
to the extent of at least six semester hours within the preceding two 
years. This requirement need apply only to teachers who have been 
in service in the Maryland public schools for at least two years im- 
mediately preceding the date when the certificate is classified. The By- 
law shall be effective from and after September 1, 1955. 

The State Superintendent asked the Board whether it would 
prefer to meet more than four times a year as required by law. It 
was agreed to schedule only the four meetings except as emergencies 
might dictate. 

The Board authorized increased insurance coverage for the nine- 
teen State cars operated by members of the Department from 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



$10,000— $20,000 to $100,000— $300,000 for public liability and 
from $5,000 to $25,000 for property damage. 

A report on school legislation introduced in the 1954 session of 
the General Assembly was presented by the State Superintendent. 
He called attention to the bills relating to the salary increase for 
school superintendents, driver education, supplementary payments 
to retired teachers, elimination of the approval of nonprofit kinder- 
gartens and nursery schools by the State Superintendent of Schools, 
Workmen's Compensation coverage for all public school employees, 
and the "report card" bill introduced by the Anne Arundel County 
delegation. 

With the exception of the Superintendents' salary bill, all other 
education bills were introduced under the sponsorship of the State 
Teachers' Association, the Parent-Teacher Association, various 
county organizations, and individuals. The Department was in- 
vited by the General Assembly to participate in hearings on all these 
bills. 

May 26, 1954 

The annual organization of the Board as required by law resulted 
in the re-election of Mr. Wendell D. Allen as president and Mr. 
Jerome Framptom, Jr. as vice-president. 

The appointment of Mrs. Ruth McCormick Tankersley to a 
full seven-year term was announced. 

Dr. Pullen introduced Miss Elisabeth Amery, State Supervisor 
of Home Economics, stating that she was asking for retirement as of 
September 1, 1954. The State Superintendent said that it had been 
a pleasure and a professional inspiration to work with her. 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin, in attendance at part of the 
meeting, expressed appreciation of the admirable work done by the 
Board and Dr. Pullen. He also expressed appreciation of Miss 
Amery's service as State Supervisor of Home Economics. 

The Board considered the decision of the Supreme Court with 
regard to segregated schools. When the Court's decision was an- 
nounced, the State Superintendent sent to the Board his statement 
to the press in which he indicated that he foresaw no immediate 
drastic changes; that the change would be made without impairing 
the rights of any individuals through arbitrary and capricious action. 

The Attorney General, in attendance at the meeting, explained 
his understanding of the decision and of the resulting situation. 
The Supreme Court has rendered a decision that segregation in the 
schools is unconstitutional but has not yet set an effective date by 
which the schools must operate in accordance with this decision. 
The Court has asked the Attorneys General of the states affected to 
file briefs to suggest how the Court's decree, when this is issued, shall 
be implemented. The Court has requested also that arguments be 
presented. The date for the hearing has been set for October 15, 



20 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



1954. The Court will then take at least a short time, and possibly 
a considerable time, to study the briefs and consider the arguments. 
Attorney General Rollins expects to confer with members of the 
State Board and State Department of Education and others and 
hopes to evolve a plan which will be of use to Maryland and to the 
Southern states. The administration of the changeover presents 
new problems and must be carefully planned. The schools must 
operate under Maryland law, which provides for separate systems 
of public schools for the two races. 

The President of the Board remarked that the State Board of 
Education would be happy to co-operate with the Attorney General 
in devising plans for implementing the forthcoming decree. There 
might be a question how far the change would be implemented on a 
State level and to what extent on a local level in collaboration with 
the State Department. Every eflf ort will be made to work the matter 
out as promptly as possible. There will presumably be questions 
with respect to both teachers and students. The Supreme Court 
has spoken, however, and has given meaning to the Fourteenth 
Amendment, passed in 1868, and has upset the interpretation of 
1896, which approved separate but equal facilities. Dr. Pullen, 
the staff, the superintendents, and the boards of education will, the 
President of the Board believes, carry out the mandate of the 
Supreme Court of the United States, in accordance with the Mary- 
land tradition of respect for rule by law. 

It was pointed out that the opinion of the Supreme Court is not 
final. The decree which will follow will be the effective pronounce- 
ment. When the Court of Appeals hears a case, its opinion is pub- 
lished. The Court passes a mandate and the lower Court may have 
to pass still another mandate. 

The Board adopted the following statement in reference to the 
Supreme Court decision: 

The Supreme Court of the land has spoken. It is the duty and 
responsibility of the State Board of Education to do all within its power 
to work out the problem "seemingly and in order" and in such manner 
that the rights and privileges of no individual are impaired by arbitrary 
or capricious methods. 

Upon the advice of the Attorney General of Maryland, the decision 
of the Supreme Court and the full implications of the decision will not be 
made until some time in the fall after the Court has had a conference 
and further hearings and arguments with the Attorneys General and 
possibly other representatives from the various states which will be 
affected. Until the conditions of the decision are made known finally, 
with the mandate and decree of the Supreme Court, any detailed plan 
of action for implementation would be premature. This statement 
does not imply, however, that the State Board of Education and the 
local school authorities, upon whom the major burden of solving the 
problem will fall, should delay in analyzing the situation and making 
plans for implementing the decision of the Court. 

The laws of Maryland specifically provide for segregation in the 
public school and in the teachers colleges. In view of this law re- 



Maryland State Department of Education 21 

quiring segregation, no program of integration can be put into effect 
until the decision of the Supreme Court becomes final and an effective 
date is set by the Supreme Court. 

The detailed problems in respect to implementing the decision 
of the Supreme Court will rest primarily upon the local boards of 
education. The problems involved in any program of integration will 
vary among the different school systems of the State, but we are con- 
fident that they will be solved in a fair, decent, and legal manner and 
with good common sense. Furthermore, we are confident that the 
local school boards, the local school officials, and the parents will settle 
this problem without resorting to chicanery or devious methods and 
with due regard for the rights of all parties concerned. Any program of 
implementation will be based upon professional and human considerations 
and not with coercive designs or methods. The public school system of 
Maryland has always been known for its high professional attitude and 
for its unbiased and unprejudiced treatment of all children. 

The role of the State Board of Education is not to set the detailed 
pattern of operation but to take an official position that the decision 
will be implemented with fairness and justice to all and with due regard for 
the professional aspects of the program. Further, its responsibility is to 
act in a general over-all supervisory nature to insure that standard, 
equitable practices are followed throughout the State. 

Dr. Pullen informed the Board that the Governor had requested 
Mr. Allen, Dr. Harry Green, and Dr. Pullen to represent him at the 
Governor's meeting on segregation in Richmond, June 7-8, 1954. 

Miss Merle S. Bateman, Director of Certification and Accredita- 
tion, explained the suggested revision of By-law 43. The Board of 
Trustees of the State Teachers' Retirement System has decided to 
allow teachers holding emergency certificates to enter the Retirement 
System on an optional basis, effective September 1, 1954. The 
Attorney General has ruled that the Board of Trustees has authority 
to take this action under Section 106 (5) of Article 77 of the An- 
notated Code of Maryland (1951 edition). In the proposed revision 
the parts of By-law 43 which deny to the holders of the emergency 
certificates the privilege of membership in the Retirement System 
have been eliminated. The Board approved the By-law in its re- 
vised form. 

Miss Bateman explained also the proposed revision of By-law 67. 
The Board had been polled by letter and had approved the issuance of 
emergency certificates to county librarians. The additions to the 
By-law describe the conditions under which such certificates may be 
issued to county librarians and the terms for which these certificates 
shall be valid. The Board approved the additions to the By-law. 

Upon request of the State Superintendent, the Board approved 
the renumbering of the by-laws so that when the school laws are re- 
printed and the by-laws appear near the sections to which they refer, 
they will be in numerical order. 

The Board's approval was given to participation in the American 
Heritage Program, sponsored by the American Library Association. 
This project under consideration since the Board meeting of February 
24, 1954, would be financed by an annual grant of $5,000 from the 



22 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 

Ford Foundation. To be supervised in Maryland by Miss Nettie B. 
Taylor, Supervisor of County and Institutional Libraries, it would 
involve making books and consultants available to adult study and 
discussion groups of participating libraries. Probably the first two 
or three seasons would be devoted to the study of basic American 
documents, such as the Declaration of Independence and the United 
States Constitution and their application to current problems. The 
topics would be decided by the individual librarian, the trustees, 
and the discussion leaders. 

The Board voted to revoke two paragraphs in By-law 31, dealing 
with rank in the upper four-fifths of the class for certification to 
teach in high school. The two paragraphs which were revoked, 
read as follows: 

8. Only those students who rank academically in the upper four-fifths 
of the class shall be admitted to the courses in education in the junior 
year. 

9. Only such graduates as rank academically in the upper four-fifths of 
the class and who make a grade of C or better in practice teaching, 
D being the passing grade, shall be issued Maryland State Teachers' 
Certificates; provided, however, that graduates who do not meet these 
standards may qualify for certification by presenting credit for the 
satisfactory completion of an additional year of academic and pro- 
fessional work of graduate grade, with an average of C or its relative 
equivalent, and at least two-thirds of the courses having been ap- 
proved by the Maryland State Superintendent of Schools. The 
additional work must include a course in practice teaching with a grade 
of at least C if the practice teaching requirement has not been met in 
the undergraduate years. 

The appointment of Mr. William L. Barall to the position of 
Supervisor of Finance was announced, effective May 1, 1954. Mr. 
T. Hofmann Clift resigned from this position, effective April 30, 
1954. 

The Board accepted the request of Miss Elisabeth Amery, Super- 
visor of Home Economics, for retirement and in this connection 
passed the following resolution: 

Resolution on Miss Elisabeth Amery 

Upon the retirement of Miss Elisabeth Amery as State Supervisor of 
Home Economics, the State Board of Education wishes to express its 
appreciation of the distinguished service she has rendered the Maryland 
public school system in her field of specialization. 

After studying at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and 
Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts, Miss Amery received a 
Bachelor's Degree in Home Economics from the University of Wisconsin 
in 1913. She then taught home economics for a year at Lead, South 
Dakota, and from 1914 until 1922 taught at the Universities of Wash- 
ington and Wisconsin. The following four years she was State Super- 
visor of Home Economics in Delaware, and after spending a year at 
Columbia University, in 1926-27, where she qualified for the Master's 
Degree, she was invited to serve in a similar capacity in Maryland. 

Miss Amery has been a leader in her profession throughout the 
country, as well as in Maryland. She is a member of two honor societies, 



Maryland State Department of Education 23 

is a life member of the American Vocational Association, and for three 
years was the vice-president of this Association, representing the home 
economics division. She has served as president of the Maryland Voca- 
tional Association, as well as of the Maryland Home Economics Asso- 
ciation, and through the years has been chairman of several committees 
of the latter organization. Last October her friends presented her with 
a life membership in the Association and a gift in appreciation of her out- 
standing service. She has been active also in the Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers in which she served as vice-president and as chair- 
man of home service and high school service. She has been State 
adviser and member of the National Advisory Board of the New Home- 
makers of America and has belonged to the Home Economics Section 
of the National Education Association and the National Council of 
Family Relations. 

The history of home economics education in Maryland county 
schools has been largely the history of Miss Amery's stimulating leader- 
ship throughout her long service as Supervisor in this field. The year 
before she began her work in Maryland approximately one hundred high 
schools offered home economics, with slightly fewer than eight thousand 
pupils. There were no home economics departments in colored high 
schools. Now pupils in more than thirty-one colored high schools have 
opportunity to learn home economics and the enrollment in the subject 
in colored county schools in 1952-53 was nearly five thousand. In the 
same year more than twenty-six thousand white pupils studied the sub- 
ject in one hundred thirty-four county schools. Miss Amery has been 
in the forefront in recognizing new possibilities and new needs in home 
economics as these manifested themselves in changing economic and social 
conditions. 

Miss Amery's achievements in her profession have been notable 
and have left a deep impress on home economics education in the Mary- 
land public schools. Among her many friends and acquaintances she is 
known also for a delightful sense of humor combined with a keen and 
kindly wit. 

The Board extends to Miss Amery best wishes for the years ahead 
and hopes that, free of official duties, they will be most pleasant and 
rewarding. 

The Board granted the request of Miss Lillian C. Compton, 
Acting President of the State Teachers College at Frostburg, for 
retirement as of December 12, 1954, and in this connection, passed 
the following resolution: 



Resolution on Miss Lillian C. Compton 

On the occasion of the retirement of Miss Lillian C. Compton, 
Acting President of the State Teachers College at Frostburg, the State 
Board of Education takes pleasure in expressing its gratitude for what 
she has contributed to public education in Maryland. 

Miss Compton obtained her early education in the public schools 
of Frederick County and in 1904 graduated from the State Normal 
School in Baltimore. In 1916 she was awarded the bachelor's degree at 
West Virginia University and after study at Hopkins and at Teachers 
College, Columbia University, qualified for her master's degree at the 
latter institution, in 1932. 

Miss Compton taught for ten years in schools in Allegany County, 
including a two-year period as a teacher of retarded pupils. She later 



24 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 

had charge of the normal training program at the Sutton High School, 
Sutton, West Virginia, was principal of the school, and then Superin- 
tendent of Schools at this location. In 1922 she returned to Maryland 
as Supervisor of Elementary Schools in Allegany County and in 1929 
became Assistant Superintendent, still with special responsibilities in 
elementary school supervision. In 1945 she was elected Acting President 
of the State Teachers College at Frostburg, and in this capacity, as in her 
earlier work, served with conspicuous success. 

While Supervisor and Assistant Superintendent in Allegany County 
Miss Compton was a dominant influence in the development of the 
county public school system. Her wholehearted devotion to the educa- 
tion of children and to the growth and welfare of the teachers won the 
respect, affection, and co-operation of the staff. Her promotion to the 
assistant superintendency was a well-merited recognition of her out- 
standing service to the county schools. 

Under the dynamic leadership of Miss Compton the State Teachers 
College at Frostburg has grown in size and in effectiveness. During her 
administration there have been added to the campus thirty-seven pieces 
of property, comprising thirty-five acres of land. She has seen the 
campus increase sixfold. A new modern athletic field, including a 
quarter-mile track and a regulation soccer field, has been constructed. 
A science building with four laboratories and two classrooms, as well as 
faculty offices, has been completed and also a new library and adminis- 
tration building named in honor of Governor Lloyd Lowndes and 
Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes, for many years President of the State Board of 
Education. An auditorium-gymnasium is under construction and 
should be finished by the end of the year. 

Before these new buildings were authorized, Miss Compton initiated 
and was chiefly responsible for enlarging the dormitory, the dining room, 
and the kitchen, and for modernizing the interiors of some of the build- 
ings to provide more and better administrative and faculty offices. 
Furthermore, the marked improvement in the appearance of the campus 
reflects her untiring interest in seeing that the College should make 
its full contribution to the development of the students and to the life 
of the community. 

Miss Compton has not confined her efforts to the physical welfare 
of the college. She has greatly strengthened the faculty and has fostered 
a remarkable spirit of co-operation among both teachers and students. 
Through her stimulating leadership the student body has increased 
from sixty to more than four hundred within a nine-year period, and the 
college has received accreditation by both the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the American Association of 
Colleges for Teacher Education. 

Though placing no limits to her efforts as head of the College, Miss 
Compton has, in addition, been an ardent worker in her church and 
in her community. She was one of the organizers of the Cumberland 
Business and Professional Women's Club, has been its president and has 
held numerous offices in the organization, and has been president of the 
State Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs. She 
has given herself unstintedly to her profession and to her community. 

The best wishes of the Board go with Miss Compton as she enters 
upon a life free from the professional responsibilities which she has so 
ably met and which have left so deep an imprint on the students and 
teachers with whom she has worked. May she enjoy the avocations to 
which she may now devote herself! 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



STATE SUPERINTENDENT'S STATEMENT 
Enrollment 

During the past decade the enrollment in the public schools of 
Maryland has increased 140,000. This represents a 52 per cent in- 
crease. A more significant fact is that 77 per cent of this school 
population increase has occurred during the past five years. The 
increase each year over the preceding year for the years 1949-50 to 

1953- 54, inclusive, was: 

1949- 50 20,808 

1950- 51 19,859 

1951- 52 18,501 

1952- 53.... 23,794 

1953- 54 25,436 

This unprecedented increase in enrollment is due to three 
primary causes, namely: (1) high birth rate subsequent to 1940, 

(2) abnormal rate of in-migration from Washington, D. C, and 

(3) increased persistence toward high school graduation. Each 
year almost without exception the birth rate has increased since 
1940. In 1953 the highest number of births in the history of the 
State was recorded; a total of 64,523 children were born. According 
to the 1950 U. S. census there were 301,457 children below the regular 
school age of six years in the State. This number is a total greater 
than the number of children in the first eight grades of the public 
school system. 

According to the most conservative estimates of the State 
Department of Education the enrollment in the public schools will 
increase by at least another 133,000 pupils during the next six years, 

1954- 1960. In other words we may expect 540,000 pupils to be en- 
rolled in our public schools in 1959-60 against a present enrollment 
of 406,234. This figure represents a percentage increase of 51 per 
cent during the 15-year period, 1945-60. 

The increase in the number of high school graduates during the 
next six years is also striking. In 1951-52 there were 12,352 grad- 
uates in all the public schools in Maryland. Of these 10,678 grad- 
uates were white and 1,674 were colored. It is estimated con- 
servatively that in 1960 there will be 21,086 graduates, of whom 
18,057 will be white and 3,029 colored. Rather interestingly the 
estimate indicates that of the 21,086 graduates 16,089 (14,344 white 
and 1,745 colored) will be in the county schools and only 5,017 
(3,733 white and 1,284 colored) in the Baltimore City schools. 

These figures do not include the kindergarten-nursery pupils 
who at present number 18,000. It is to be assumed that this number 
will increase rather greatly and that additional kindergartens and 
nursery schools will be established in other parts of the State. 
Particularly will this be true in Prince George's County, whose 
delegation in the General Assembly had a special act passed in the 
1952-53 session of the legislature authorizing the establishment of 



26 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



such schools. It is not possible to project with any accuracy the 
number of children who will be in the kindergartens and nursery 
schools in 1960 for the simple reason that all parents do not send their 
children to these schools. 

To recapitulate then we shall have an enrollment in 1959-60 of 
at least 540,000 children in grades 1-12 as compared with the present 
enrollment of approximately 400,000 in the same grades. This is a 
most conservative estimate. 

No matter how the problem is viewed it is stupendous. Teach- 
ers must be secured for these additional children, classroom space 
provided and at the same time steps taken to improve some of the 
deplorable conditions already existing, such as the overcrowded 
conditions in some of our schools, the half-day session for thousands 
of children, and the employment of a large number of teachers with 
sub-standard certificates. 

Teachers and Teachers Colleges 

During the past year a committee has been studying the prob- 
lem of teacher training and teacher supply. Its investigations were 
very carefully made and its conclusions warrant deep consideration. 

There are 15,225 teachers in grades 1-12 of the public schools 
for the current year 1953-54. Approximately 2,000 teachers with- 
draw from the teaching profession each year in Maryland for one 
cause or another, and from 800-1,000 teachers are needed each 
year to take care of the additional number of pupils. This makes a 
total of between 2,800-3,000 new teachers that have to be employed 
each year. Of this number some 1,500-1,700 are needed each year 
in the elementary schools. During the same period the five teachers 
colleges will turn out from 312 to 450 teachers for the elementary 
schools or roughly one-fourth of the number needed. 

Two or three striking points emerge from these figures. First, 
the total number of teachers in the Maryland school system now 
will have reached nearly 20,000 in 1959-60. Of course, the state- 
ment is predicated upon the actual securing of these teachers. 
Secondly, during the next six years there will be employed each year 
from 2,800-3,000 teachers or a total of between 17,000 and 18,000 
teachers. 

From these figures the importance of the teachers colleges 
can be readily seen. The enrollment in these colleges has grown 
during the past few years, but since it takes four years to train a 
teacher, the number of graduates is as yet not large enough to make 
too big an impact upon this great problem. 

It will be necessary to have additional facilities to take care of 
a much needed increased enrollment in these colleges. Considerable 
progress has been made during the past several years in building, 
with each college sharing in the construction. However, these 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



colleges with increased enrollments will constitute the largest source 
of teacher supply for the elementary school. 

The State Board of Education has authorized the approval of 
certain other institutions for the training of elementary teachers pro- 
vided they meet the standards set by the Department. The Uni- 
versity of Maryland has already begun such training, andjit is pos- 
sible that some other colleges will do likewise. However, the 
Department is not overly optimistic that these institutions will pro- 
vide many additional teachers. 

Several counties have provided, with the assistance of the teach- 
ers colleges during the summer, in-service training courses. This pro- 
cedure has added a fairly large number of teachers to the ranks. 
In-service training courses conducted by one or two counties during 
the school year have been helpful. 

Classrooms 

A detailed survey has been carried on by the State Department 
of Education of the school building needs in each county and Balti- 
more City. Incidentally, this type of study has been made from 
time to time. In 1945 as a result of a carefully planned study, the 
State Planning Commission through Governor O'Conor gave 
$500,000 to the counties and Baltimore City to pay for plans for 
school buildings that were to be constructed after the war. This 
wise stroke enabled the State school system to be prepared to move 
quickly when the war was over and to build before the building costs 
increased as they did later on. It has been estimated conservatively 
that the schools of the State saved some $20,000,000 or more by be- 
ing prepared and completing so many buildings before 1953. 

School buildings in the counties and Baltimore City have been 
built or added to at a cost of approximately $175,000,000. There 
are approximately 11,275 children on part time and the class size in 
certain schools is considerably more than the number considered 
desirable. At the moment there is no satisfactory estimate of the 
number of children who are not housed properly, but undoubtedly 
the number is considerable. 

The figures given above show a minimum increase in enrollment 
of 133,000 during the next six years, but the number will likely be 
thousands more. These additional children then would require 
some 4,500 or more classrooms, the total cost of which could be 
estimated accurately only after completion of a detailed study show- 
ing where each classroom is to go and whether it is to be part of a 
new building or an old building. A preliminary estimate of the 
total amount of money needed for the construction of these buildings 
is approximately $200,000,000. 

The intensity of the problem of financing these buildings will 
vary from county to county depending upon the over-all bonded 
indebtedness. Many of these classrooms will be needed in counties 
where bonded indebtedness has reached a high ratio to the assessable 



28 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



basis. As a result, the local fiscal authorities, on the advice of 
reputable investment bankers, are reluctant to incur increased 
indebtedness for any purpose. The urban counties and those with 
greatly increased population due to Federal impact are most seriously 
affected. Prince George's, Charles, and St. Mary's counties face an 
extremely critical situation in this respect and, of course, Baltimore, 
Anne Arundel, and Montgomery counties, although fairly wealthy, 
likewise are faced with a similar situation. The gradual raising of 
assessments throughout the State has the same effect as increassd 
taxation, although in one sense this is helpful as it increases the bor- 
rowing power of the county. 

The problem now is to particularize the problem for each 
county and Baltimore City so that each may begin to look for some 
solution. The answer to this problem cannot be found entirely on 
the local level. It may be that some counties with a limited popula- 
tion and slow growth can take care of their own situation, but it is 
doubtful that some of the counties, particularly those having the 
largest populations in the State, will be able to meet this situation 
adequately without some additional aid from the Federal or State 
Government. The Incentive Fund is helping to some extent, but 
it is entirely too small to be of any great value. The additional loan 
fund of $20,000,000 authorized by the Legislature of 1953 is helping 
the situation, but obviously it is not enough in itself to resolve the 
problem. The Federal Government during the past two or three 
years has aided in the amount of $14,974,041 in Anne Arundel, 
Baltimore, Charles, Cecil, Frederick, Howard, St. Mary's, Prince 
George's, and Montgomery counties. The total of these grants is 
equivalent to approximately seven-tenths of the total State grant 
($20,000,000) to the twenty-three counties and Baltimore City. 

Maryland must provide school buildings for possibly 175,000 
children (the additional children plus those that are not housed prop- 
erly at the present) during the next six years, or a large number of 
children will be going to school on part time, in rented quarters, or 
not at all. It is a problem of great magnitude. 

Education of Handicapped 'Children 

Other problems demand attention, notably the lack of educa- 
tional opportunities for mentally and physically handicapped chil- 
dren. It should be noted that great strides are being made however. 
For two years a Commission appointed by the State Board of Edu- 
cation has been studying the problem. Under its auspices a na- 
tional body is conducting a careful study of the opportunities for the 
blind. It is hoped that additional studies, such as in the field of the 
deaf and of the cerebral palsied, and others will be conducted also. 

The program of education of handicapped children on a State- 
wide basis is now in its twenty-fifth year in Maryland. As a result 
of legislation enacted by the 1929 General Assembly, State aid in 
the amount of $10,000 was made available for the first time in 
Maryland for classes for crippled children. From this beginning in 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



1929 there has grown a program of special education which in 1953-54 
is serving an estimated 2,500 handicapped children and for which 
$180,000 was provided from State funds. The number of children 
includes about 840 instructed at home, 200 in hospital schools, 180 
in special schools, and an additional 1,200 pupils instructed in 
special classes in regular schools. The education of handicapped 
children does not differ in kind from that provided to normal youth. 
More time is required and a high degree of individual instruction is 
necessary. 

When these handicapped youth reach the age of sixteen years, 
they become eligible to participate in the program of vocational 
rehabilitation. In this program handicapped individuals are given 
such physical restoration as may be necessary and provided education 
and training in an occupation for which they display a promising 
aptitude and in which there is a better than average chance of the 
handicapped individual becoming a self-supporting citizen. 

According to the provisions of the existing legislation, the State 
of Maryland provides financial assistance to the counties and the 
City of Baltimore for the education of handicapped children in the 
following manner: 

1. The expenses for the operation of special classes are con- 
sidered as an approved part of the minimum program of education 
in determining the amount of equalization aid. 

2. An amount not to exceed $600 per child shall be paid toward 
the cost of teachers, special equipment, nursing, therapeutic treat- 
ment, and transportation if the needs of such child cannot be met by 
ordinary school facilities. This subsection of the law has been in- 
terpreted to mean home instruction, and special transportation for 
the teacher and /or the child. 

3. An amount not to exceed $600 per child shall be paid for the 
appropriate education of handicapped children in special schools 
when the county or the City of Baltimore, in which such handicapped 
child resides, does not provide special classes or special instruction 
for the education of physically and /or mentally handicapped 
children. 

Maryland's legislation for the education of handicapped children 
represents the most forward-looking approach to the problem of any 
State in the nation. A recent opinion by the attorney general has 
removed what was considered a defect in the law; that is, the grant- 
ing of State aid in an amount not to exceed $600 for each child to a 
nonpublic school when no adequate program is provided by the local 
public schools. The attorney general ruled that the public schools 
(the nonequalization fund county and Baltimore City public 
schools) are entitled to the same grant. The problem now must be 
met in the main by the local school systems providing opportunities 
for these children. 



30 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 
Certification 

In 1953-54 several members of the Division of Certification and 
Accreditation and the large committee on teacher supply and teacher 
preparation which had functioned the previous year continued to 
work on a proposed revision of requirements for certificates. 

As will be seen from TABLE 58, page 112, the number of certi- 
ficates issued each year is steadily increasing. Most of the increase 
has been in the number of emergency certificates, although many of 
the teachers to whom such certificates were issued were college 
graduates and therefore had the general cultural background which 
is an important element in teacher preparation. Such teachers may 
without great difficulty qualify for regular certificates. 

A circumstance which will doubtless operate to encourage the 
teachers holding emergency certificates to qualify as rapidly as pos- 
sible for regular certificates is that according to a by-law passed by the 
State Board of Education on February 24, 1954, the superintendents 
may rate emergency certificates as first class only when the ap- 
plicant, in addition to meeting the other requirements heretofore 
made, has presented plans for an approved program of study leading 
to a regular certificate and has worked toward the completion of this 
program to the extent of at least six semester hours within the pre- 
ceding two years. The requirement need apply only to teachers who 
have been in service in the Maryland public schools for at least two 
years immediately preceding the date when the certificate is classi- 
fied. The by-law becomes effective from and after September 1, 
1955. The teacher is entitled to automatic salary increases only 
when his certificate is rated first class. It will therefore be to the 
financial advantage of the teacher to see that he qualifies for first- 
class rating. 

Teacher and Higher Education 

The work of the Division in connection with teacher and higher 
education is the primary responsibility of the Assistant Director. 

On August 26, 1953, the State Board of Education passed a 
motion that because of the critical need for elementary and secondary 
school teachers during at least the next decade, Maryland institu- 
tions of higher learning, which, by agreement, have confined their 
teacher preparation to the secondary field or which have offered no 
courses in education, should be given an opportunity to prepare 
teachers for Maryland public elementary schools, if the institutions 
so desire and if their programs are approved by the State Superin- 
tendent. On February 24, 1954, the Board adopted tentative 
standards for the approval of Maryland institutions of higher learn- 
ing which wish to offer programs leading to certification in the ele- 
mentary and /or secondary school, with the understanding that the 
standards would be shortened and edited and that they would be 
used as a guide in approving professional education programs 
which various Maryland colleges might wish to offer. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



The University of Maryland immediately presented a tentative 
plan for the preparation of elementary school teachers. The plan 
was approved, subject to changes which might be made as the Uni- 
versity and this Department studied it further. Goucher College, 
which had already been offering courses in primary education for 
several years and which in September, 1953, had inaugurated a one- 
year graduate program in elementary education in co-operation with 
the Ford Foundation, later applied for approval of these programs. 
Notre Dame and Mount Saint Agnes Colleges presented plans 
for proposed programs in elementary education. Hood College pro- 
posed to offer only a limited number of courses in elementary edu- 
cation and to suggest that their students qualify for elementary 
school certification by supplementing this work with professional 
study during several summers, probably after their sophomore, jun- 
ior, and senior years. Washington Missionary College, which had 
for some time been preparing elementary and secondary school 
teachers, chiefly for service in its denominational schools, applied 
for approval of its programs. 

It was decided to have two librarians survey the professional 
libraries at these colleges and then have a committee of three con- 
sultants study the programs submitted, visit the colleges concerned, 
and recommend whether the programs should be approved. 

In April, 1954, the librarian of Teachers College, Columbia 
University, and the librarian at Trenton Teachers College, evaluated 
the libraries and made recommendations for their development. 

Later in the month a committee consisting of the President of 
Wilson Teachers College, Washington, D. C; the Assistant Com- 
missioner of Education and Head of the Division of Higher Education 
in New Jersey; and the critic teacher at the State Teachers College in 
California, Pennsylvania, constituted an evaluation committee for 
the educational programs at the six institutions mentioned. The 
committee and the Director and the Assistant Director of the 
Division visited the colleges, discussed the programs with members 
of the Departments of Education at the colleges and in most in- 
stances with the presidents of the colleges, and later conferred re- 
garding the evaluation of each program. Subsequently the com- 
mittee prepared and submitted reports which recommended that the 
actual or proposed full programs be approved, but suggested changes 
which the committee thought would strengthen the work. The 
State Superintendent accepted these reports and forwarded them 
to the respective colleges. 

The Assistant Director was a member of a number of committees 
dealing, respectively, with the reorganization of the teacher educa- 
tion curriculum at the Teachers Colleges, the cost of an adequate diet 
for boarding students at these institutions, the budgets for the Teach- 
ers Colleges, and the evaluation of the University of Maryland by the 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Middle States. 
He also had charge of assigning twelve teachers from Germany to 



32 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



various Maryland counties during their three weeks' stay in the 
State. 

Accreditation 

Section 20 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 
1951 edition, provides that, with certain exceptions, nonpublic 
schools may operate in Maryland only if they are approved by the 
State Superintendent. 

While the law exempts from its provisions schools operated by 
bona fide church organizations, one such institution, which for a few 
years had been offering a two-year course in business education, ap- 
plied for approval as a junior college. A committee consisting of the 
Executive Secretary of the American Association of Junior Colleges 
and the President of Averett College, Danville, Virginia, visited the 
institution with the Director and the Assistant Director of the 
Division and recommended that certain steps be taken by the school 
before the State Board approve it as a junior college. The report 
was sent to the institution. 

One professional institution closed during the year because of 
low enrollment and financial problems. The Division had been 
working closely for several years with the school and with the pro- 
fessional licensing board concerned, in an effort to see that the in- 
stitution operated on a sound and creditable basis. The situation 
deteriorated, however, instead of improving. The students who 
were enrolled at the school were assisted in registering at other in- 
stitutions which offer preparation in the same field. 

Academic Schools Below College Level 
The number and kinds of nonpublic academic schools below the 
college level which were operating in the State in 1953-54 are as 



follows: 

Type of School , Number 

Secondary 41 

Secondary — Elementary 7 

Secondary — Elementary — Kindergarten — 

Nursery School 1 

Secondary — Elementary — Kindergarten 1 

Tutoring 9 

Special 12 

Elementary 3 

Elementary — Kindergarten 5 

Elementary — Kindergarten — Nursery School 6 

Primary — Kindergarten 7 

Primary — Kindergarten — Nursery School 5 

Kindergarten 26 

Kindergarten — Nursery School 28 

Nursery School 36 

Total 187 



Secondary Schools 

In 1953-54 the responsibility of visiting the nonpublic secondary 
schools in the State was taken over by the two high school super- 
visors. The supervisors spent the time familiarizing themselves 
with the reports submitted by the schools and visiting the institu- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



tions. One school which had been approved as a secondary school 
became a tutoring school. 

Elementary and Nursery Schools and Kindergarten 

During the year twelve new schools below the high school level 
applied for and received approval. Three applications were pend- 
ing at the end of the year. Generally, schools which apply for 
approval are visited at least twice before approval is granted and at 
least once each year following approval. 

Certificates for fourteen schools were returned or revoked dur- 
ing the school year 1953-54. Eleven of these closed voluntarily, 
three continued to operate as child care or play centers rather than 
as schools, and one moved out of the State. Eighty-four schools in 
these categories have been approved continuously since 1948, when 
the law requiring approval became effective. 

Annual reports from the elementary and preschool centers indi- 
cate the following enrollments: 



Type of School Enrollment 

Nursery School 2,268 

Kindergarten 2,234 

Elementary 2,619 

Special 433 



Total 7,554 



The number of teachers employed in these schools was 650. 
Seventeen are certificated for early childhood education and twenty- 
nine have State certificates for elementary school teaching. Some 
of the rest of the teachers would qualify for certification, except that 
they have earned no credits within recent years, and others need 
only a few additional credits in particular fields. Ninety-two of the 
teachers earned some college credits during the year and forty 
participated in noncredit courses. 

Nineteen centers visited did not meet the standards for approval 
and therefore could not claim to be educational institutions. Local 
officials have been urged to notify the State Department of Educa- 
tion regarding any schools conducted without its approval, but 
possibly there were some centers of which the Department was un- 
aware. 

The Supervisor of Accreditation in this area and the Director 
and the Assistant Director of the Division participated in several 
meetings of the State School Health Council, which was considering 
centers operating without licensing or approval. The Supervisor 
served as a member of a subcommittee to work out recommended 
standards for such centers. The Supervisor also attended a number 
of Parent-Teacher Association meetings, as well as workshops, 
conferences, teacher group meetings, and parent co-operative plan- 
ning meetings. 



34 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



In 1953-54 an act passed by the 1953 Legislature providing that 
Prince George's County should make certain provisions for kinder- 
gartens became partially effective. The schools have continued as 
private centers, but the county offered certain services and hopes to 
offer supervisory responsibility for these schools in 1954-55. 

Early in the year a study was made of approvals of schools by 
local fire and health departments and additional visits were re- 
quested in those cases in which there was no report of a recent survey. 

In the fall a bibliography of recent professional publications 
was sent out to all the schools and seemed to be helpful to some of 
the directors. A list of sources for audio-visual materials likewise 
was furnished to the directors. 

In April the Supervisor of Accreditation and the Director of the 
Division spent a day in conference with the Assistant in Early 
Childhood Education in the New Jersey State Department of Edu- 
cation. It was found that teachers in kindergartens and nursery 
schools in New Jersey must have or must be working toward acquir- 
ing thirty semester hours in the field of early childhood education. 
Since the public schools have kindergartens, the teachers colleges 
offer courses in this field and these are available to the nonpublic 
school teachers. The fact that New York City is very near makes 
it easy to have specialists from New York offer professional courses 
in preschool education. Furthermore, the nonpublic school centers 
can attract qualified teachers because most of the centers are sub- 
sidized and the salaries are relatively high. 

While in the nonpublic elementary and preschool situations, as 
in most other schools, it is not possible to insist that all the teachers 
be college graduates with professional preparation, Maryland is 
ahead of many states in providing for the approval of nonpublic 
schools and kindergartens. In most states licensing is done by 
the departments of health and welfare. 



During the school year 1953-54, twenty- two nonpublic non- 
academic schools were approved and received certificates from the 
State Superintendent. These schools were divided into the follow- 
ing categories: 



Committees of experts were assembled in several cases to assist 
in the evaluation of these schools prior to accreditation. The con- 
sultants visited and reported on a school of costume and millinery 
design; on two art schools involving work in pastels, oils, and cera- 
mics; and on a school of theater arts. During the year approxi- 



Nonacademic Schools 



Art 

Barbering 

Beauty Culture 

Costume and Millinery Design 

Dance 



Dramatics 
Flying 

Life Insurance Underwriting 
Music 

Theater Arts 



Maryland State Department of Education 35 

mately 175 nonpublic nonacademic schools were on the list of ap- 
proved institutions. Each school was visited at least twice and in 
some cases more frequently. Various State licensing boards were 
consulted with regard to problems in the respective fields and joint 
visits by representatives of the agencies concerned were made. 

Schools in the following categories closed during the period: 



Type of School Number 

Beauty culture 3 

Dance 1 

Flying 1 



Jewelry and leather fabrication 1 

Management 1 

Music 2 

Painting and paperhanging 1 

Refrigeration 1 

Upholstering 1 

Welding 1 

In most cases the schools discontinued operations because of de- 
clining enrollments. 

Approval for Veterans' Training 

A special responsibility of the Division of Certification and 
Accreditation is the approval of schools for veterans' training. In 
1953-54, post-high-school courses in various institutions were ap- 
proved for the training of veterans, as follows: 



Type of Course Number 

Residencies and internships 14 

Nursing 9 

College or university 9 



As of June 30, 1954, 48 nonpublic nonacademic schools were 
approved under Public Law 550 or under both this law and Public 
Law 346. Twenty-three of these schools had previously been and 
were still approved under Public Law 346. Nine private instructors 
in the areas of speech correction and music were approved under 
Public Law 346, one of these instructors holding approval also under 
Public Law 550. 

All of these schools and private instructors were visited periodi- 
cally for purposes of supervision and also to follow up referrals from 
the Veterans Administration. 

From information gathered at conferences of the State Approval 
Agencies it seems that Maryland is especially fortunate in its rela- 
tions with the schools accepting veterans and with the Veterans 
Administration officials. This favorable situation is doubtless due 
primarily to the fact that the schools are approved under an over-all 
State program for the approval of nonpublic schools rather than as an 
entirely separate activity under a contractual arrangement with the 
Veterans Administration. 



36 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The services of the Division of Instruction to county schools 
during the school year ending June 30, 1954, may be grouped into 
six broad classes: (1) leadership training programs for curriculum 
improvement; (2) evaluations and studies; (3) special adaptations 
in the program of curriculum development; (4) administration and 
community relations; (5) materials of instruction; and (6) identifica- 
tion of trends and problems as bases for future planning. 

Leadership Training Programs for Curriculum Improvement 
Programs for Principals 

In leadership training programs for the Negro schools this year 
major emphasis was centered around the role of the principal in the 
improvement of instruction at both the elementary and secondary 
levels. As a follow-up of the two-week principals' workshop held at 
the State Teachers College at Bowie in June, 1953, regional one-day 
conferences of principals and supervisors were held in October to 
consider ways by which both teaching and nonteaching principals 
can help teachers. Dr. A. G. Macklin, Director of the Division of 
Basic Studies at Virginia State College, was the consultant at these 
conferences. In five counties follow-up conferences were held in the 
spring on a more intensive level. Both Dr. Macklin and Dr. Eva 
Mitchell of Hampton Institute made excellent contributions. Their 
services were made available through a special grant from the 
Southern Education Foundation. The workshop at Bowie this 
summer was a continuation and an intensification of last summer's 
workshop. 

The reports and materials prepared in the State-wide workshops 
for Negro principals and supervisors at the State Teachers College 
at Bowie in the summer of 1953 and in previous years were evaluated 
and their application studied in the regional conferences in October 
in an attempt to make them on-going activities. 

As an outgrowth of the principals' workshop last summer a 
program of intervisitation was arranged for Negro supervisors and 
supervising principals. Programs operating in seven counties were 
visited by the various groups to see how the supervisor and super- 
vising principal work with teachers to improve the teaching-learning 
situation. 

Four Maryland principals attended a five-week South-wide 
workshop for the in-service training of principals during the summer 
of 1953 at Tuskegee Institute, and four different principals have been 
selected to attend a similar workshop in July, 1954. The workshop 
programs are financed by grants from the Southern Education 
Foundation and are organized and evaluated in co-operation with the 
supervisors from the state departments of education of the fourteen 
Southern States. In addition, one Negro principal from each of 
these states received a ten-week full scholarship at George Peabody 
College for Teachers for the 1954 summer session. This is a pioneer 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



program involving carefully chosen principals who may pursue a 
post-master's program during successive summers at the college. 



Supervisors' Conferences 

Three regional meetings of general and special supervisors were 
held in the fall, as follows: October 19-21, State Teachers College 
at Frostburg; October 28-30, State Teachers College, Towson; and 
November 4-6, State Teachers College, Salisbury. The theme of 
each of the conferences was "Helping Teachers Promote Pupil 
Growth." Using a guide for observation and discussion, teams from 
each conference visited schools in the area as a basis for determining 
effective supervisory procedures and programs that might have value 
in the improvement of the total program in the State. 



Child Study 

The child study program has continued to be a major in-service 
program. This year there were in operation 55 first-year groups, 
30 second-year groups, and 29 third-year groups, making a total of 
114 groups. There were 1,029 teachers involved in the program. 
Twelve counties this year had consultant service from the Institute 
for Child Study of the University of Maryland. 

Two State-wide meetings of two days each were held in January 
and March to give training and information to child study leaders, 
with Negro and white leaders meeting together for the first time in a 
State conference. 

Parent Education 

This year there were 120 parent-education groups in 17 counties, 
with 1,690 participants. This shows an increase over last year's 
enrollment of 1,251 parents. Consultant service was made available 
by the State Department of Education to about fifteen counties 
during the year. A total of approximately 1,500 parents was in- 
volved. More parent leaders developed this year than before, but 
they still feel inadequate. On June 30 and July 1 the Institute for 
Child Study operated at the University of Maryland a workshop for 
parents and parent leaders. 



Language Arts 

Five regional meetings on language arts were held with ele- 
mentary and high school supervisors this year. The emphasis was 
on word perception and recognition skills, classification of needs in 
word recognition, and analysis of word recognition abilities. There 
is widespread interest in this program throughout the State. Most 
counties have a continuing program in which they have used as re- 
source personnel specialists in reading from Columbia University, 



38 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



Boston University, University of Delaware, University of Mary- 
land, Temple University, and the Maryland State Teachers Colleges. 
The Division of Instruction worked closely with these programs in 
twelve counties. 

One section of the workshop at Bowie this summer worked in 
this area. 

Health and Physical Education 

Throughout the State there is an eagerness to get more education 
into physical education and to get more physical education into the 
education program. Two significant meetings were held this year. 
The county supervisors of health and physical education studied 
the need for recruitment of high school girls into the field of teaching 
physical education. The scarcity of women physical education 
teachers is becoming a critical problem. The other meeting was 
requested by the Eastern Shore superintendents and was devoted to 
the girls' interschool program. Miss Rachel E. Bryant of the staff 
of the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation served as consultant and helped to point out that the 
girls' program should be directed toward an extramural program 
with many teams competing at grade levels rather than a few teams 
for those with superior skills. 

The State Association for Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation held a very successful midwinter convention in Frederick 
on "Children and Youth in Focus." There were many elementary 
classroom teachers present to see the demonstrations. Superin- 
tendents, supervisors, and principals were also in attendance. 

A guide entitled Public Health Nursing Services as Part of a 
Total Health Program in the Schools of Maryland was prepared by the 
State Department of Health in co-operation with the State Depart- 
ment of Education and distributed for study and use in the counties. 

Safety Education 

The Safety Committee of the Maryland State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation has reached the conclusion that safety projects should be 
stimulated at the local level rather than developed at the State level. 
Various counties have been asked to write up the things they have 
been doing in safety education. These accounts will be evaluated 
and reports on good practices disseminated throughout the State. 

The State Committee on Driver Education met twice this year 
and is preparing a bulletin setting forth plans and policies on which 
the driver education programs in the counties should be based. 

Arithmetic 

Dr. John Clark, Professor Emeritus, Columbia University, who 
served as consultant to the mathematics group at the Bowie work- 
shop last summer, was in the State several times during the year and 
worked with supervisors and principals in regional conferences de- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



voted to improving mathematics instruction in the schools. Several 
counties are going ahead with their own programs in this area. 
This project is an attempt to rethink the arithmetic program, espe- 
cially in the elementary school, and to see what there is that should 
be done for pupils at the various grade levels. This work was con- 
tinued in the workshop at Bowie in June, with Dr. Clark, Dr. 
Howard F. Fehr of Columbia University, and Miss Dorothy N. 
Batts of Virginia State College as consultants. 

Foreign Languages 

The State Committee on Foreign Languages met at the State 
Department of Education in December, reviewed progress to date, 
and planned next steps in the expansion and improvement of the 
program. The committee canvassed the possibility of adapting 
instruction in foreign languages to the needs of pupils other than 
those preparing for college. Content and procedures which 
characterize language teaching as a part of general education were 
reported by two classroom teachers. 

In several elementary schools in the State, foreign language is 
being taught to intermediate grade pupils. The availability of a 
college teacher or of a patron with qualifications for this work has 
made these programs possible. To make such opportunities general 
would require a revision in the total cycle of factors involved in the 
instructional program in elementary schools — teacher selection, 
teacher education, materials of instruction, the program of offerings, 
and scheduling. 

Music 

Three workshops in music education for classroom teachers were 
held the latter part of June, one at Frostburg, one at Salisbury, and 
one at Bowie. These were intended to develop in the teacher the 
skills and understandings necessary to his carrying a reasonable 
share of the music education of his pupils and essential to his using 
music as an integral part of the total education of the children. The 
workshops were well attended. Consultants were Dr. Frances M. 
Andrews of Pennsylvania State University, Mrs. Mary M. Hunter 
of Peabody Conservatory of Music, Miss Margaret Lowry of Queens 
College, and Miss Harriet Nordholm of Michigan State College. 

Science 

Considerable work was done in several counties in helping science 
teachers work out projects and guides to aid them in working with 
youngsters in the general education program and in developing great- 
er understanding and use of projects and experiments in teaching 
science in the senior high school. The workshop group at Bowie 
this summer made a report on experiments at all grade levels which 
teachers can use in teaching in their own counties. 

The elementary school people are concerned with correlating 
science with the social living program and listing kinds of community 



40 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



resources they can use in developing their progam. Several coun- 
ties have completed outlines for this particular work. 

Guidance 

A Committee on Guidance and Evaluation, with Dr. Warren G. 
Findley of the Educational Testing Service as consultant, began work 
in March on the further development of the guidance program. As 
a preliminary step, each elementary and high school principal and 
guidance counselor was asked to list the two or three most challeng- 
ing, urgent, or important professional problems related to the de- 
velopment of adequate guidance services in his school. 

At a meeting of the committee in May tentative plans were made 
for issuing a printed bulletin on guidance to replace the 1943 bulletin 
which is now out of print. Those in the field will be involved in this 
project during the next school year. 

County Workshops 

During the summer eleven counties conducted workshops for 
the in-service education of teachers in these counties. Most of 
these were devoted to revisions and improvements in elementary 
and high school curriculums. In preparation for these workshops 
and in the workshop programs themselves various members of the 
staff of the Division of Instruction served as consultants. 

Curriculum Workshop 

As a result of reports made at the conference of superintendents 
at Easton in November and of informal conferences of groups of 
superintendents and State Department of Education personnel, the 
conviction was expressed that a re-examination of the educational 
program since 1945 is needed. As a follow-up, the Superintendents' 
Committee on Curriculum and Supervision was expanded to act as 
an exploratory committee for rethinking the over-all framework of the 
curriculum and for planning a State workshop to set a direction for 
the next five or ten years. The committee agreed at a meeting in 
February that the workshop should be devoted to a re-examination 
of the general education program, grades one through twelve, and 
that the workshop should be held in the summer of 1955. The 
committee is now working on plans for the workshop. 

Evaluations and Studies 
Changes in the Testing Program 

The reading readiness test was dropped from the State testing 
program this year. It was suggested, however, that the counties 
might want to plan their own testing programs for pupils entering 
the first grade. 

Representatives of the Divisions of Instruction and Finance and 
Research met in October to discuss the State testing program and 



Maryland State Department of Education -i: 

reached the following agreements which will be presented to the 
county superintendents at the beginning of the school year 1954-55: 
(1) beginning with the school year 1954-55. the responsibility of 
selecting, administering, and financing tests of mental maturity and 
of achievement will be that of the local county exclusively; 2 the 
Division of Instruction, as a service to the counties, will undertake 
the development of a bulletin listing and analyzing some good 
tests which might be used in connection with the local testing pro- 
gram, suggesting the valid uses of test results, and describing various 
procedures which might be used in establishing a complete evaluation 
program ; 1 3 the State Department of Education will be interested in 
using tes:s related specifically to whatever research or experimental 
projects it might be carrying on at the time. 

Testing and Problems of Instruction in Junior High Schools 

The testing program in the Negro junior high schools was follow- 
ed with considerable interest since it tends to reveal and confirm some 
of our gravest concerns, one of which is the apparent leveling off of 
both achievement and mental maturity somewhere at the junior 
high school level. There is a need to look critically at the effective- 
ness of the junior high school program, particularly in the areas of lan- 
guage arts and mathematics. The piling up at the junior high school 
level of nonverbal boys and girls needs careful study. The largest 
turnover in pupil population occurs at the junior high school level. 

The largest turnover of teaching staff also occurs at the junior 
high school level. This whole area will remain the big problem for 
many years as the elementary school population continues to expand. 

Special Adaptations in the Rbogram of Curriculum Development 
Programs for the A:y: 

Children who deviate widely from the average in mental de- 
velopment require careful diagnoses and special educational plan- 
ning. Many who are severely retarded mentally except for the 
totally dependent and the extreme custodial cases are remaining in 
school, and some authorities now think that these children should be 
educated, if possible, in the public schools. The extent of their 
potential development is not known, but a curriculum should be 
developed for them. 

Children who are .ess severely retarded have been attending the 
public schools for many years, some in regular classes and others in 
special classes. When the retardation is pronounced, not only 
mentally but socially as well, special classes have been organized, 
i here ~ere 38 such classes in the counties in 1953-54. 

The program for superior children has, for the most part, been 
one of enrichment. Special projects involving research techniques, 
creative expression, or similar stalls have been devised in order that 
these children, at each grade level, may develop their powers to the 
maximum. 



42 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 

Within the last few years the counties have organized other 
special classes for children who are orthopedically handicapped, 
emotionally disturbed, and /or visually handicapped. 

Speech and Hearing Programs 

There was an increase this year in the number of speech teachers 
in the State. Two meetings of the speech teachers were held this 
year, one at the State Department of Education in October and one 
at Walter Reed Hospital in March. 

Only in Montgomery County is there a person who works with 
hard-of-hearing children. 

Special Education Committee 

The Committee to Study Special Education in Maryland com- 
pleted its third year of work and will continue for at least another 
year. There are seven subcommittees now preparing reports, one 
in each of the following areas: locomotor and other crippling condi- 
tions, sight, speech and hearing, gifted, mentally retarded, malad- 
justed adjudged delinquent, and other maladjusted. 

Program for Migrants 
The provision of a program of education for migrant children is a 
problem of grave concern to the State. The schools of the State 
should assume some responsibility for these children during the sum- 
mer months when they are at work in the fields and should exercise 
particular care for those under sixteen when school is in sassion. 
This problem affects the Eastern Shore counties, a few counties in 
the western part of the State in the apple season, and Baltimore 
County in bean-picking season. Over 1,000 migrant children come 
to the Shore each year. One school had to take on extra teachers in 
the fall to care for migrant pupils. Every effort is being made to get 
these children into school in the fall. Plans should be made also to 
get them into school when they arrive in the late spring. 

Juvenile Protection 

Judges of the juvenile courts were invited to participate in the 
State-wide conference of supervisors of pupil personnel and visiting 
teachers held in Baltimore September 28 through October 1, 1954. 
Many probation officers were also present. The pupil personnel 
worker is the one person who ties the work of the school and the 
court together, and a close working relationship is being developed. 
In many cases now the court notifies the pupil personnel worker when 
a child gets into trouble. Those in the pupil personnel program are 
working to emphasize the early detection of behavior problems, along 
with attendance problems, and to establish a close relationship with 
parents of these pupils. 

The functions and the relationship of the pupil personnel serv- 
ice to the general program of public education are expressed in the 
bulletin issued this year, Handbook for Pupil Personnel Workers. 1 

^Handbook for Pupil Personnel Workers, Maryland School Bulletin, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1. Balti- 
more: Maryland State Department of Education, June, 1954. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



Civil Defense 

About a year ago the Superintendents' Committee on Civil 
Defense and the Maryland Civil Defense Agency issued a Civil 
Defense Manual for the Schools of Maryland. The State Department 
of Education co-operated with the Agency in informing the county 
systems of films and other instructional materials related to civil de- 
fense programs, and a number of schools continued first-aid programs 
and sporadic defense drills. However, the rapid increase in the 
potential destructiveness of the bombs and uncertainty and dis- 
agreement among defense authorities have resulted in like uncer- 
tainty among the schools and a consequent slackening in organized 
efforts to habituate pupils to established defense procedures. 

Administration and Community Relations 

The superintendent of schools expresses the close interrelation- 
ships between the school system and its community. The principal 
expresses corresponding inter-relationships between the local school 
and the community from which it draws its pupil personnel. Each 
co-ordinates and facilitates the interchange of resources, of under- 
standing of needs, and of evaluation of achievements. During the 
past year members of the Division of Instruction assisted in further- 
ing a number of conditions and practices designed to strengthen the 
position of the administrator, most particularly in his role as rep- 
resentative of the school to the community and of the community to 
the school. 

Television Programs 

The State Committee on Television planned and broadcast 
fourteen programs in the "Your Child in School" series from 
WMAR-TV during the year. Six of these programs were broadcast 
from the Anne Arundel County schools, six from Baltimore County, 
and two from the State Teachers College at Towson. Each pro- 
gram was thirty minutes in length and was televised live from the 
classroom. This year the programs included reading, social studies, 
and science in the elementary school; art, English, industrial arts, 
and social studies in the high school; the lunch program in an ele- 
mentary school; practice teaching for student teachers in a junior 
high school; and art instruction on the college level. 

In each instance, notice of the program to be televised was sent 
to schools throughout the State and to parents in the vicinity of the 
school where the program was televised. Teachers and classes in 
some schools watched the programs and discussed the content and 
procedures used. The parents in each school used met with the 
principal and discussed the program and how it was a part of the 
total program of the school. 

There are more requests from counties for the opportunity to 
make television broadcasts than can be furnished at present. The 
possibilities in television broadcasts as part of the school program 
have not as yet been thoroughly explored. There seems to be a great 
opportunity to inform the public of what the schools are doing, to 



44 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



initiate study programs, to present teaching procedures, and to give 
demonstrations for pupils in various areas. 



Class Size 

One of the State Supervisors of High Schools made a study of 
class size and identified for the superintendents of schools practices 
which are significant in showing degree of effectiveness and skill in 
using the number of teachers permitted under the present minimum 
allotment, in revealing where the emphases have been placed in the 
program of offerings, and in indicating inequities with respect to class 
size and teacher load. 

In visiting Negro high schools this year, it was found that there is 
improvement in the principals' organization of their schools in terms 
of class size. There was some growth in the principals' ability to 
get fairly good distribution in class size. 

Negro high schools are now reaching the size (average enroll- 
ment, about 400) where they can offer more varied types of programs 
— academic, vocational, commercial, and general. The transition 
from one type of program to two or three complicates the use of the 
staff because it increases the number of offerings and tends to cut 
down class size. It poses a problem of organizing the offerings and 
scheduling classes. All except seven schools this year utilized their 
full staff assignments. Only two were understaffed to such an ex- 
tent as to handicap their program offerings, and new facilities will 
relieve one of these next fall. One of the most significant trends 
is the building of excellent modern school plants. This year marked 
the continuation of the postwar building program that has provided 
either completely new units or extensive additions to existing 
buildings in every county in the State. 

The State Supervisors of High Schools will continue for the 
present to offer their services to counties which desire to use the 
Secondary School Organization Report as a means of examining 
critically and analytically the school's program of offerings and the 
use of its staff. 

How the Principal Spends His Time 

At the request of and in co-operation with the principals of 
Negro high schools, one of the State Supervisors of High Schools 
made a study of how the principal spends his time during the school 
day. Twenty-five principals co-operated in recording their job- 
related activities for a period of one week in the fall and one week in 
the spring. The findings showed that the typical principal during 
the school day spends 44 per cent of his time in administration, 37 
per cent in instructional leadership, 14 per cent in pupil relationships 
and problems, and 5 per cent in school-community matters. Of the 
37 per cent spent in instructional leadership, about one-fourth is 
spent in visiting classes. Considerable variation was found among 
the reporting principals as to the use of their time. Difficulty in 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



following a pre-planned schedule and in long-time planning was a 
major concern. 

Playgrounds 

Some progress was made this year in promoting the develop- 
ment and use of school grounds as extensions of the facilities of the 
school plant, expressing the close interrelationship of school and com- 
munity programs. Many of the counties have programs for the 
development of school grounds in line with the economic and rec- 
reational life of their communities. In some counties plans have 
been developed in which specific appropriate areas are set aside for 
farming, gardening, games, farm ponds, outdoor dramatics, wood 
lots, forestation projects, out-of-doors biological laboratories, and 
nature trails. In others the emphasis is on the development of 
community recreation programs. 

Materials of Instruction 
School Libraries 

In ten counties this year the elementary supervisors worked on 
the problem of elementary school libraries. Many administrators 
and teachers are realizing that they cannot have a great wealth of 
materials for youngsters in each classroom and that there are many 
advantages of a central library. The pattern of development differs 
with each county, since in each instance efforts are made to adapt 
services to local needs and conditions. Those places are most 
successful where youngsters and teachers take part from the be- 
ginning in the development of the program. There is, of course, 
the ever-present danger that some people think of the library in 
terms of organization of material. Work needs to be done with 
supervisors and with teachers in individual schools to help them see 
what the program should be and how it can be developed with the 
resources available. 

The manual, School Libraries in Maryland, 2 issued in June, 
attempts to express a point of view as to what the school library is 
and that the librarian is simply another teacher in the school. It 
gives specific helps for the librarian and for the teacher who is trying 
to give library service. 

Development of Instructional Materials 

Arrangements were made for the printing of the twenty-three 
picture portfolio collections depicting six aspects of life in each 
county — geographical, historical, occupational and industrial, social, 
scenic, and unique — and the Pictorial Maryland Collection of 275 
individual pictures characterizing these six areas in the four sections 
of Maryland. Work was continued on the development of 24 film- 
strips in color from the 27 sets of kodachrome slides depicting various 
aspects of living in Maryland. 



2 School Libraries in Maryland, Maryland School Bulletin Vol. XXXIII, No. 2. Baltimore: 
Maryland State Department of Education, June, 1954. 



46 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



The third bulletin in the Conservation Series, Our Underwater 
Farm, was issued. The first and fourth bulletin in the series, This 
Is Our Wealth and Our Mineral Wealth, are still in the process of 
preparation. Work is also being done on the bulletins on water 
and soils. The remaining three — on forests, wildlife, and human 
conservation — will be done at a later time. 

This year the Baltimore City Department of Education and the 
State Planning Commission were invited to join the Co-ordinating 
Curriculum Committee which consists of representatives of various 
State agencies. This committee evaluates and lists instructional 
materials for use in the schools. The list sent to the counties this 
year was in two sections, the first consisting of materials developed 
by State agencies which may be ordered through the State Depart- 
ment of Education and the second consisting of materials which 
must be ordered directly from the publishers. The policies con- 
cerning the selection and listing of these materials need to be re- 
examined carefully. 

A three-day film preview was held in March, and twenty of the 
films previewed were purchased by the Division of Library Ex- 
tension. The policies set up for the purchase of films and their dis- 
tribution from the State Film Library were restudied and revised 
somewhat. 

The editing committee of the State Committee on Art incor- 
porated the ideas submitted to them in a bulletin, Art in Our Mary- 
land Schools, 3 which was issued this spring. The point of view ex- 
pressed in this bulletin recognizes that the art program is conditioned 
by the beliefs the teacher has about art in the total educational 
program. The bulletin's primary purpose is to present a philosophy 
rather than detailed information about procedures and materials. 
It concentrates upon the child and what art can do for him. 

The editing committee also made plans to issue a supplement to 
the bulletin, which will list materials, equipment, and tools that are 
important for the practical implementation of the art program. 

Identification of Trends and Problems as Bases 
For Future Planning 

The most important problems evident in elementary and 
secondary schools today are related to the fact that these schools 
are rapidly becoming parts of a twelve-grade common school. This 
trend encompasses many smaller trends and reflects the changes 
which are coming about in our economic and civic life. The con- 
tinued increase in the productive capacity of the nation growing out 
of cumulative technological advances tends to divert into the schools 
the total age group six to seventeen years. So the schools move 
toward the inclusion in their enrollments of the widest ranges and 
complexities of individual differences. These differences may be 
expressed in terms of personal traits and attributes — mental, 



3 Art. iv P>'r Maryland Schools: Baltimore: Maryland State Department of Education, 1954. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



emotional, and physical — or in terms of competence, potential and 
actual, in the various arts fields. At the same time the requirements 
of our national life, as business, industry, and civic enterprise move 
to higher levels of insight and skill, impose upon education the task 
of drawing from the people levels of competence more nearly in 
keeping with their full potentials. 

The growing shortage of teachers must be appraised in rela- 
tionship to the facts just stated. While society is expecting more of 
the schools, a segment of the teaching staff of increasing size lacks the 
technical qualifications specified as minimum necessities for the job. 

The problems sensed by the supervisors in the Division of 
Instruction evidence this relationship. The Supervisor of Pupil 
Personnel, for instance, expresses it in this way: "One of the objects 
of the service of pupil personnel is to get pupils into school. After 
they are in school, what can be done to keep them there and to 
counteract unfortunate conditions in some homes? Many parents, 
particularly in farm areas, are still resisting the law requiring pupils 
to attend school until sixteen years of age. It is very difficult to 
keep the slow learners in school when the program is not adjusted 
to their needs/' 

The report of the State Supervisor of Elementary Schools ex- 
presses also the growing discrepancy between demands upon the 
schools and the shortage in teacher education necessary to meet the 
demands: "There are a number of problems in elementary schools 
which need attention: (1) the proportion of untrained teachers con- 
tinue to grow; (2) a trend toward more formal work in the schools 
raises problems in connection with marking and promoting and 
attitudes toward children; (3) there is a trend toward adding more 
general supervisors and also more specialists in art, music, and read- 
ing to county staffs. These trends and problems have led to the 
repeated suggestion that in the near future work be done on develop- 
ing standards and techniques for better evaluation of elementary 
school programs. Counties are asking for definite standards for ele- 
mentary schools. The present School Administrative Manual 4 does 
not include enough material applicable to the first six grades." 

The State Supervisor of High Schools reports also the need for 
re-evaluating the content and procedures used in junior and senior 
high school programs. The scope, sequence, and balance in offer- 
ings should be studied critically in the light of the requirements of 
the total program. Plans that are made with total requirements 
in mind must provide for the strong probability that the number 
and proportion of unqualified secondary school teachers will con- 
tinue to increase for some years. 

^Maryland's Educational Program, School Administrative Manual, Mpryland School Bulletin, 
Vol. XXXII, No. 2. Baltimore: Maryland State Department of Education, June, 1952. 



4h 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 
The Division of Library Extension has as its primary function 
the development of adequate library service throughout the State in 
public libraries, school libraries, and libraries in State institutions. 
It was established by law in 1945 as a division of the State Depart- 
ment of Education replacing the Maryland Public Library Advisory 
Commission. Its services are divided into two main areas — con- 
sultant and lending of materials. 

Close contact is maintained with libraries throughout the State 
by means of conferences, visits, correspondence, and reports. 
Through the services of its consultant staff, the Division: 

1. Provides opportunity for professional growth by means of workshops 
and conferences on library problems and practices. 

2. Works co-operatively with library organizations and committees in the 
development of State-wide plans and standards for library service. 

3. Advises public library boards of trustees and library staffs on policies 
and practices within their own libraries. 

4. Advises and assists county superintendents, supervisors, principals, 
and teachers concerned with the problems of school library develop- 
ment. 

5. Advises and assists State institutions in the establishment or extension 
of library service within the institutions. 

6. Evaluates library services throughout the State in terms of accepted 
standards and methods. 

7. Compiles and disseminates statistical and other factual information on 
libraries in the State. 

8. Promotes and interprets library development through contact with 
government agencies, civic groups, and interested individuals. 

9. Works with groups, organizations, and individuals interested in the 
establishment or extension of libraries. 

Books, periodicals, pamphlets, and audio-visual materials are 
lent by the Division to libraries to supplement local resources and to 
individuals who live in areas without public libraries. Every county 
borrowed materials in 1953-1954, totaling 62,742 items. This was 
a decrease of 14 per cent over 1952-53, but 40,366 items more than 
were borrowed in 1947-48, which was the first year the Division had 
an appreciable budget for materials. Only 4 per cent of this year's 
materials were borrowed by groups and individuals in areas without 
public libraries. Ninety-six per cent went to libraries, schools, and 
State institutions. One-fifth of all materials loaned was adult non- 
fiction which could not be secured in local libraries. One-fourth of 
this adult nonfiction was borrowed by the Division through inter- 
library loan; most of which was made available to people of the coun- 
ties through the co-operation of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

Exhibits accounted for 30 per cent of all loans. For the third 
year the Division made available to the counties two identical ex- 
hibits of about 900 books related to the school curriculum and rang- 
ing in interest and readability for preschool through senior high 
school. These titles, selected nationally from the output of all pub- 
lishers, comprised the Combined Book Exhibit. The county boards 
of education and sometimes jointly with the county libraries, dis- 
played the books for a week or longer so that teachers, librarians, 
pupils, and parents were given opportunity to examine them and 
make recommendations for purchasing for the local libraries. This 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



practice has resulted in better choice of materials both for the school 
curriculum and for satisfying the interest of pupils. In several 
counties, programs on books and reading were given while the books 
were on display. 

Exhibits of interest to State and local groups were arranged for 
such organizations as the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teach- 
ers, the Maryland State Teachers Association, the State 4-H Con- 
ference, and a CIO regional educational workshop at New Windsor. 
The new bookmobile, belonging to the Annapolis and Anne Arundel 
County Library, was exhibited during the Maryland State Fair at 
Timonium. The bookmobile was filled with a book collection 
ready for a day's run and a librarian was there to talk with the 
visitors about library and bookmobile service. A colorful and in- 
formative folder about bookmobiles was distributed. 

Public Libraries 

Public libraries in the counties continue to show a gradual in- 
crease in income, book stock, and use of books. Almost 4,000,000 
books were loaned from public libraries during the past year. There 
were 64 professional librarians employed in public libraries and the 
support for operation was just under $1,000,000. 

The fourteen county libraries which received State aid are 
lending five times as many books, have five times as many librarians 
and five times as much money as libraries in these same counties in 
1945-1946, which was the year before the Public Libraries Law 
of 1945 went into effect. However, most of the libraries do not have 
enough books or staff to give a good quality of service. The average 
operating income was 77 cents per capita as compared with the 
Maryland goal of $1.50 to $2.50 per capita. In terms of these goals 
set by the Maryland Library Association and generally accepted as 
standards throughout the nation, Maryland libraries need at least 
twice as many books, librarians, and income to reach the minimum 
standard for adequate service. 

The fourteen county libraries in the State aid program reach 
about 46 per cent of the population of the State and another 40 per 
cent is served by the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore which 
also receives State aid. Of the other 14 per cent, about 5 per cent 
live within the vicinity of municipal or town libraries, and 9 per cent 
live in areas where no public library service exists. 

In seven of the fourteen counties with county libraries, the local 
appropriation for library support has risen above the two-cent 
minimum required by the Public Libraries Law of 1945. Seven are 
still receiving the minimum. The additional State aid of ten cents 
per capita which was made available by the 1953 law passed by the 
General Assembly will be paid beginning July 1954 to county libra- 
ries and Baltimore City. 

The State Superintendent of Schools appointed a Library De- 
velopment Committee, consisting of six administrators of State- 



50 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



aided public libraries and three members of the Division of Library 
Extension, to plan the future services the public libraries should ex- 
pect to offer and the part in library service which should be the func- 
tion of the Division of Library Extension. Dr. Lowell Martin, 
Dean of the Graduate School of Library Service of Rutgers Uni- 
versity, was brought in as a consultant for this committee's studies 
for two days, May 12 and 13. 

Members of the Division work closely with the Maryland 
Library Association's Legislative and Planning Committee in their 
continued efforts to prepare a program of legislation which will 
provide increased support for public libraries. The Maryland Con- 
gress of Parents and Teachers, the Maryland State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation, and other member organizations of the Maryland Council 
on Education work for the passage of good library legislation. 

The Division held three meetings for public librarians during 
the year. A two-day meeting in Easton in April was devoted to a 
discussion of statistics and their use in interpreting and evaluating 
library services. Mr. Hershel Hadley, Chief of the Work Measure- 
ment Bureau, Office of Industrial Relations, Department of the 
Navy, was consultant for the meeting. 

At the request of many librarians, a one-day meeting was held 
with representatives of the Maryland State Teachers Retirement 
System and the Maryland representative of social security system to 
discuss their application and benefits to public librarians. 

In an effort to promote adult education activities in libraries 
throughout the State, the Division invited Mrs. Grace Stevenson, 
Associate Executive Secretary of the American Library Association, 
to meet with librarians to discuss the group discussion project on the 
topic, Our American Heritage, sponsored by the American Library 
Association under a grant from the Fund for Adult Education and 
now in operation in public libraries in fourteen State-wide programs. 
Subsequent conferences with librarians interested in initiating such a 
program in their libraries led the Division of Library Extension to 
apply to the American Library Association for a grant. Maryland 
did not receive a grant for 1954-55 but has been asked to reapply 
for 1955-56. 

An institute on County and Regional Library Service was held 
at Rutgers University, June 7-11, 1954. Seventeen librarians from 
Maryland attended, representing twelve county librarie and the 
Division of Library Extension, giving Maryland the largest rep- 
resentation of any state. Several Maryland librarians served on an 
advisory committee for the institute or appeared on the program. 

Eastern Shore public librarians and trustees held two meetings, 
one in the Cecil County Library at Elkton and one in the Corbin 
Memorial Library at Crisfield. Meetings were planned co-operative- 
ly by a committee of librarians and the Supervisor of County and 
Institution Libraries and emphasized book selection and reader 
guidance. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



The St. Mary's County Memorial Library was selected as one 
of ten libraries in the United States for a case study of adult educa- 
tion activities in small and medium-sized libraries. The study was 
conducted by the Graduate School of Library Service of Rutgers 
University. 

School Libraries 

The employment of librarians for the large elementary schools 
in Baltimore County is but one evidence of the State-wide interest 
shown in this phase of the school program. Teachers and pupils 
working together are developing central libraries in the elementary 
schools, either as total school or class enterprises; elementary super- 
visors are arranging one-day work sessions for teachers who serve as 
library chairmen and for principals; faculty groups are working on 
the philosophy and use of the library in the elementary school. 
More money is being appropriated on a per pupil basis for elementary 
library books, and teachers and pupils are being given opportunities 
to examine books before making their selection for purchase. There 
are few schools left in which each teacher does her own book pur- 
chasing. It is the general practice now for each teacher to suggest 
materials, for a faculty committee to prepare the final order, and 
for all of the books to be purchased either by the school or through 
the County Board of Education. 

For several years Garrett County has been developing libraries 
in the elementary schools as total school libraries. This year their 
program was evaluated by a team composed of Mrs. Mary Peacock 
Douglas, Supervisor of School Libraries in Raleigh, N. C, the Di- 
rector of the Division of Instruction, the State Supervisors of Ele- 
mentary Schools, County and Institutional Libraries, School and 
Children's Libraries, and the Garrett County Librarian. 

A committee of school librarians and the Supervisor of School 
and Children's Libraries prepared a manuscript for a school library 
handbook to be published by the State Department of Education, 
which will be ready for distribution by the beginning of the school 
year 1954-55. 

There are 117 full-time high school librarians in the State, 99 in 
the counties and 18 in Baltimore City. There are 28 elementary 
school librarians, 22 in Baltimore County and 6 in Baltimore City. 

The needs for next year are no different from what they have 
been in the past. The most obvious need is for librarians in the 
large elementary schools. Large high schools need more than one 
librarian. 

In counties where elementary schools are small, some provision 
needs to be made for a librarian to work with teachers who are de- 
veloping the library programs in the schools. 

Library quarters should be included in all new school buildings, 
and funds should be allocated as part of capital outlay to provide 
basic book collections in these schools. 



52 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



State Institutions 

The Division of Library Extension has the responsibility for 
the promotion of improved library service in the State-operated 
hospitals, training schools, and correctional and other institutions. 
The responsibility is carried out primarily through the activities and 
advisory services of the Supervisor of County and Institution Librar- 
ies. 

The Division also lends books and other materials to institu- 
tions, prepares special collections of books for exhibit and evaluation, 
and makes available to institutions all the lending and other services 
available to other libraries throughout the State. 

The number of volumes loaned to State institutions during the 
year was 2,196. 

The library project at Springfield State Hospital, using volun- 
teers working under the Hospital's Department of Rehabilitation 
and trained and supervised by the Supervisor of County and In- 
stitution Libraries, has created an interest in the library by the 
staff and an eager acceptance by the patients reached by the service. 
A designated number of wards of the hospital are visited weekly by 
the volunteers with book carts. An average of 700 books per month 
are borrowed by the patients. New books have been procured 
through funds from the Mental Hygiene Society of Greater Baltimore 
which also recruits volunteers, arranges transportation and schedules, 
and plans monthly in-service conferences for the group. The Di- 
vision of Library Extension has loaned several hundred books to the 
library and fills special requests weekly. Continuous effort is being 
made to provide a professional librarian position in the hospital bud- 
get but with no success to date. The library service could be 
greatly expanded to reach all patients, if staff were available. 

The library at Crownsville Hospital was organized by the staff 
of the Hospital's Rehabilitation Department under the Direction of 
the Supervisor of County and Institution Libraries. New library 
quarters are provided in the new rehabilitation building. 

A library was organized at Rosewood this year with a full though 
untrained staff of members. It is actively used by the academic 
school but does not reach the rest of the institution population. 

A professional librarian was added to the staff at Mt. Wilson 
Tuberculosis Hospital as well as a budget for library books and 
magazines. This brings to three the number of librarians in the 
State tuberculosis hospitals. These libraries continue to show an 
increase in books and magazines borrowed by patients. 

The Supervisor of County and Institution Libraries attended 
two out-of-State meetings emphasizing the program of the juvenile 
training schools, including the National Conference held by the De- 
partment of Health, Education, and Welfare. In connection with 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



state and national committees she participated in the formulation of 
standards for library service in the training schools. An active 
library is in operation at Boys' Village, but in the other training 
schools in the State there is little evidence of library service. 

Progress in library development in the State institutions as a 
whole is slow and uneven. It is often impeded by lack of personnel, 
lack of interest, and lack of understanding of the value and function 
of an institution library. The staff of the Division of Library Ex- 
tension has continued to work in every manner possible to stimulate 
the development of useful and active libraries. It is our hope that as 
institution administrators recognize their value, it will be possible 
for them to secure funds and personnel for adequate development. 



54 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISIOxN OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

The Maryland State Department of Education completed its 
first quarter century of vocational rehabilitation service to disabled 
adults on June 30, 1954. During the 25-year period, more than 
30,000 persons over the age of 16 were registered and approximately 
10,000 of them were placed in suitable jobs after receiving one or 
more essential services. Of the remaining cases, about 5,000 were 
still in the process of rehabilitation on June 30, and the others had 
been closed out for various reasons, most of them after receiving 
valuable service of some kind. All of these disabled citizens met the 
requirement of being physically or mentally handicapped to the 
extent that they could not secure or hold remunerative jobs at the 
time they were reported to the Division. In spite of such wide 
coverage, however, the total number reached was less than a third 
of the known population who are eligible for and in need of vocational 
rehabilitation.* 

To measure the effectiveness of the Maryland program, one 
needs to consider it in the light of these "minimum essential criteria" 
established by the States Vocational Rehabilitation Council for 
evaluating state agencies: 

A true philosophy of vocational rehabilitation 
Provision of needed services to all groups of the disabled 
Extension of the program to every section of the State 
Maintenance of a well-qualified staff 
Adequate use of community resources 
Development of public understanding 
Sound administration 

A recent self-survey based on these criteria, conducted by the 
Maryland staff itself and followed by a study in which workers from 
five other states participated, shows that the Division has reached 
the point where it is in excellent position to serve many more disabled 
clients under the acceleration program made possible through new 
legislation (P. L. 565, 83rd Congress). 

Philosophy 

Vocational rehabilitation is designed to provide disabled per- 
sons with all the services they need in order to place them in suitable 
employment and make of them better citizens in their communities. 
It implies that the public schools will make such services available 
to all the handicapped who are eligible for and in need of them. 

In addition to the obligation imposed on the State, there is a 
very real one which is imposed upon the disabled person himself. 
He must have a sincere desire to overcome his handicap and must be 
willing to put forth the energy and effort required to do this. He 
must be willing to assume his full share of the financial burden of 
his rehabilitation to the extent of his ability, and he must develop a 



* Vocational rehabilitation is a process involving counseling; physical, mental, and social restora- 
tion; vocational training; and placement of the disabled person in suitable employment. 



Maryland State Department of Education 55 

social attitude based on the idea that he is responsible for sharing 
the "common load" along with his physically normal fellow citizens. 

Maryland has consistently practiced this philosophy of mutual 
co-operation on the part of the disabled client and the vocational 
rehabilitation service. 

Needed Services to All Groups of the Disabled 
Any program of vocational rehabilitation in order to be success- 
ful must make available to all clients whatever services are needed 
to adjust them in suitable employment. Maryland does exactly 
this. Throughout the State abound public and private facilities 
that are capable of giving instruction, rendering medical treatment, 
supplying adequate prostheses, and offering all types of employ- 
ment. Both the State and Federal laws are broad enough in their 
interpretation to permit financial aid in any field of service where it is 
needed for the client's adjustment. 

Maryland services all groups of the disabled, too. Prior to 
1943, only the physically disabled were included in its program, but 
with the passage of P. L. 133, services were extended to the mentally 
handicapped, the epileptic, and all other groups. Special attention 
is given to the tuberculous, the blind, the cardiac, and the mentally 
handicapped by counselors who have had training in these areas. 

Extension of Program to Every Section of the State 
Because of the distribution of the State's population and the 
nature of its geography, rehabilitation workers have been stationed 
where they can be available to the greatest number of disabled clients 
Maryland has attempted to take rehabilitation to the people in their 
own communities in the belief that the disabled worker is a better 
citizen where he is best known. 

The Central office is maintained in Baltimore for purposes of 
administration and supervision. The employees here work on a 
State-wide basis. There are five district offices located in the chief 
geographic areas, and in each of the districts outside of Baltimore 
there are local offices established in communities where the number 
of disabled clients makes it advisable. 

This plan of decentralization of rehabilitation functions makes it 
possible to serve clients more quickly and efficiently and provides the 
framework for growth and development of the program as the needs 
for it increase. 

Well-Qualified Staff 
The Vocational Rehabilitation staff of Maryland in 1954 con- 
sisted of 30 professional workers and 17 clerical assistants. Each of 
these employees came to the Division with a background that has 
been most helpful in his work with the handicapped. Some coun- 
selors came from the field of education, some from industry, and 
others from welfare and related services. Many of the staff members 
are veterans, and a number of them are former rehabilitation clients. 



56 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



A well-organized program of in-service training for the staff is 
conducted on a continuous basis through periodic meetings at the 
central office in Baltimore and in an annual conference at the State 
Teachers College in Frostburg. All supervisors and counselors are 
sent to various conferences and institutes in other states on a rotation 
basis, and this practice has contributed much to their knowledge of 
how rehabilitation functions in other states. 

The majority of staff members hold Masters' degrees from 
standard colleges and universities; several of those who have not yet 
completed their graduate work are enrolled in schools of education 
and psychology for summer courses. 



Adequate Use of Community Resources 
No program of vocational rehabilitation can be self-contained; 
if a disabled person is to be successfully adjusted, he must have 
available all the resources that can be supplied by various com- 
munity agencies and individuals. Maryland is fortunate in having 
numerous groups that devote their full time and attention to the 
welfare of the disabled, and co-operative agreements between them 
and rehabilitation have been working well during the past 25 years. 

Chief among the private agencies operating in this field are the 
Maryland Tuberculosis Association, the Baltimore League for 
Crippled Children, the Baltimore Goodwill Industries, the Maryland 
Workshop for the Blind, and the cardiac evaluation unit of the 
Maryland Heart Association. Public agencies that render valuable 
assistance and provide essential services are the State and county 
departments of welfare, health agencies, Maryland State Employ- 
ment Service, and the various hospitals that serve such special groups 
as the tuberculous, the mentally disabled, and the chronically ill. 

From the standpoint of community resources, therefore, Mary- 
land has a well-developed integrated program for all groups of the 
handicapped. 

Development of Public Understanding 

Through the activities of the Governor's Committee to Promote 
Employment of the Handicapped and its 24 local branches, the Di- 
vision has been able to publicize the advantages that come to em- 
ployers through hiring handicapped workers. This committee also 
conducts various contests among school children and makes awards 
to outstanding employers and disabled persons annually; these 
activities add further to the effectiveness of the rehabilitation pro- 
gram. 

During the past three years, the Division has conducted a tele- 
vision program called "Comeback" which has told the story of 
rehabilitation to hundreds of thousands of persons. The project 
has contributed much to boosting the morale of the handicapped 
and toward helping the public to understand the many possibilities 
of their adjustment in employment and in the community. 



Maryland State Department of Education 57 

Extensive use has been made also of newspapers and "house 
organs;" all of the publications in the State have been anxious to 
run human interest stories whenever space permits. 

In most sections, periodic broadcasts have been made over 
radio stations, and literature telling the rehabilitation story has been 
distributed widely among both the disabled and others who are in- 
terested in the program. 

Sound Administration 

Maryland has developed its vocational rehabilitation program 
slowly but soundly during the 25 years of its existence, and although 
Federal funds for its operation have been equal to, or greater than, 
State aid throughout the entire period, the State Department of 
Education has retained complete control of operations and has 
determined the size and direction that the vocational rehabilitation 
service should assume. 



58 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1954 







Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




^Days' 


Opening 


(.losing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


County 






Ot I ■ ' )' > 1 3 , 


' ./ O Ij N T t 




Schools, 


Schools, 












ocnoois 


September , 






Were Open 


1953 


1954 




Were Open 


1953 


1954 


Baltimore City. 


183 


8 


18 


Garrett 


181 


9 


9 










180 


8 


15 


Allegany 


183 


8 


11 


Howard 


180 






Anne Arundel . . 


181 


10 


17 


Kent 


180 


s 


11 


Baltimore 


180 


8 


18 


Montgomery . 


180 


10 


17 


Calvert 


180 


9 


15 












181 


8 


9 


Pr. George's . . 


180 


8 


15 










Queen Anne's. 


182 




11 


Carroll 


180 


8 


11 


St. Mary's . . . 


180 


S 


16 


Cecil 


180 


10 
9 


15 


Somerset 


181 


2 


2 


Charles 


181 


17 


Talbot 


180 


8 


11 


Dorchester .... 


181 


9 


11 




Frederick 


181 


9 


16 


Washington . 


181 


8 


9 










Wicomico. . . . 


181 


8 


8 










Worcester. . . . 


180 


8 


10 



TABLE 2 Number Public Schools in Session Less Than 180 Days: Counties of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1954 





Schools in Session Less Than 180 Days 


Year 










County 


Total 
Number 


One-Teacher 
Elementary 


Graded 
Elementary 


High 
School 


WHITE SCHOOLS 


1953 


2 




2 




1954 


10 


1 


6 


3 




2 


fl 


fl 


Carroll 


1 




bl 




1 






e*l 




1 


cl 






3 




ccg3 
al 






2 




dl 




COLORED SCHOOLS 






1953 


3 




3 




1954 


3 


i 


1 






1 










2 


ii 







* Combined Elem.-High. 

a, 178; b, 177; c, 176; d, 174; e, 172; f, 171; g, 131. 
Reasons for graded elementary and high schools: 

Baltimore — alterations and building; 

Carroll — heating difficulties; 

Charles— heating and water difficulties; 

Prince George's — construction delay in two schools: other school closed April '54 -children moved 
away; 

Talbot — construction delay; 
Washington water shortage. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



TABLE 3 Fall Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: Public and Nonpublic by 
Color: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 






















Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 



enrollment 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


515,064 


422,299 


92,765 


353,876 


289,535 


64,341 


161,188 


132,764 


28,424 


Baltimore City 


180,907 


127,347 


53,560 


130,253 


91,221 


39,032 


50,654 


36,126 


14,52k 


Total Counties* 


334,157 


294,952 


39,205 


223,623 


198,314 


25,309 


110,534 


96,638 


13,896 


Public 




















Total State 


428,973 


338,883 


90,090 


281,315 


219,421 


61,894 


147,658 


119,462 


28,196 




138,034 


86,206 


51,828 


94,967 


57,476 


37,491 


43,067 


28,730 


14,337 


Total Counties* 


290,939 


252,677 


38,262 


186,348 


161,945 


24,403 


104,591 


90,732 


13,859 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


86,091 


83,416 


2,675 


72,561 


70,114 


2,447 


13,530 


13,302 


228 




42,873 


41,141 


1,732 


35,286 


33,745 


1,541 


7,587 


7,396 


191 


Total Counties 


43,218 


42,275 


943 


37,275 


36,369 


906 


6,943 


5,906 


37 



teaching staff 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


18,577 


15,463 


3,114 














Baltimore City 


6,211 


4,538 


1,673 














Total Counties* 


12,366 


10,925 


1,441 














Public 




















Total State 


15,452 


12,430 


3,022 


8,803 


6,977 


1,826 


6,649 


5,453 


1,196 


Baltimore City 


4,726 


3,117 


1,609 


2,819 


1,758 


1,061 


1,907 


1,359 


548 


Total Counties* 


10,726 


9,313 


1,413 


5,984 


5,219 


765 


4,742 


4,094 


648 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


3,125 


3,033 


92 














Baltimore City 


1,485 


1,421 


64 














Total Counties 


1,640 


1,612 


28 















NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


tl,264 


tl,001 


t263 


1,114 


877 


237 


279 


233 


46 


Baltimore City 


f270 


t200 


t70 


235 


175 


60 


53 


43 


10 


Total Counties* 


t994 


T801 


T193 


879 


702 


177 


226 


190 


36 


Public 




















Total State 


f926 


t680 


f246 


799 


577 


222 


211 


168 


43 


Baltimore City 


tl55 


f96 


59 


126 


76 


50 


34 


25 


9 


Total Counties* 


f771 


t584 


tl87 


673 


501 


172 


177 


143 


34 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


t338 


t321 


tl7 


315 


300 


15 


68 


65 


3 


Baltimore City 


T115 


jl04 


11 


109 


99 


10 


19 


18 


1 


Total Counties 


t223 


t217 


t6 


206 


201 


5 


49 


47 


2 



For basic data see TABLES 18, 19, 20, I, V, and X. 

* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates. 



60 



Eighty- Eighth Annual Report 



CHART 1 

Number of Pupils in Public Schools by Color : Counties of Maryland and 

Baltimore City: 1928-1954 



270 



2U0 



210 



180 



150 



90 



60 



30 



















• 
/ 












i 
i 

* 
1 














J— 

i 
i 

i 










Counties 


• White / 


/ 

/ 






^ y 






























Baltimore C 


Lty- Whitr' 










Counties - 


Colored 








t' 


Baltimore 


.«» — W 

City - Colo 


•ed 














Mil 









1928 1933 1938 1913 191*8 1953 1958 



Tear 



Maryland State Department <>r Education 



61 



rABLE 4 — Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools: State of Maryland: 

1945-1954 



Year 


Total 


PUBLICf 


Nonpublic 


Ending 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Countiea 



GRAND TOTAL 



945 


354,210 


151,036 


203,174 


296,754 


113,821 


182,933 


57,456 


37,215 


20,241 


946 


356,895 


150,055 


206,840 


297,590 


112,551 


185,039 


59,305 


37,504 


21,801 


947 


363,103 


150,943 


212,160 


301,173 


113,149 


188,024 


61,930 


37,794 


24,136 




375,391 


154,450 


220,941 


310,149 


115,725 


194,424 


65,242 


38,725 


26,517 


949 


390,867 


156,704 


234,163 


323,403 


117,476 


205,927 


67,464 


39,228 


28,236 


950 


413,731 


161,075 


252,656 


343,923 


121,365 


222,558 


69,808 


39,710 


30,098 


951 


441,005 


165,136 


275,869 


367,532 


124,948 


242,584 


73,473 


40,188 


33,285 


952 


464,240 


169,320 


294,920 


386,724 


128,682 


258,042 


77,516 


40,638 


36,878 


953 


495,543 


177,329 


318,214 


414,183 


135,935 


278,248 


81,360 


41,394 


39,966 


954 


529,429 


184,753 


344,676 


443,338 


141,880 


301,458 


86,091 


42,873 


43,218 



TOTAL ELEMENTARY 



945. 
946. 
947 
94S 
949. 
950 
951. 
9 52 . 
953 
954 



279,436 


124,062 


155,374 


233,278 


93,472 


139,806 


46,158 


30,590 


15,568 


250,226 


108,823 


141,403 


$202,482 


78,168 


124,314 


47,744 


30,655 


17,089 


251,821 


108,906 


142,915 


201,803 


77,725 


124,078 


50,018 


31,181 


18,837 


261,225 


111,486 


149,739 


208,505 


80,069 


128,436 


52,720 


31,417 


21,303 


273,038 


113,904 


159,134 


218,173 


81,872 


136,301 


54,865 


32,032 


22,833 


287,879 


116,996 


170,883 


230,315 


84,401 


145,914 


57,564 


32,595 


24,969 


302,040 


119,056 


182,984 


241,106 


86,019 


155,087 


60,934 


33,037 


27,897 


317,556 


121,662 


195,894 


253,061 


88,381 


164,680 


64,495 


33,281 


31,214 


339,728 


127,812 


211,916 


271,745 


93,697 


178,048 


67,983 


34,115 


33,868 


364,451 


133,057 


231,394 

1 


291,890 


97,771 


194,119 


72,561 


35,286 


37,275 



TOTAL HIGH 



945 


74,774 


26,974 


47,800 


63,476 


20,349 


43,127 


11,298 


6,625 


4,673 


946 


106,669 


41,232 


65,437 


J95,108 


34,383 


60,725 


11,561 


6,849 


4,712 


947. . 


111,282 


42,037 


69,245 


99,370 


35,424 


63,946 


11,912 


6,613 


5,299 


948 


114,166 


42,964 


71,202 


101,644 


35,656 


65,988 


12,522 


7,308 


5,214 


949 


117,829 


42,800 


75,029 


105,230 


35,604 


69,626 


12,599 


7,196 


5,403 


950 


125,852 


44,079 


81,773 


113,608 


36,964 


76,644 


12,244 


7,115 


5,129 


951 


138,965 


46,080 


92,885 


126,426 


38,929 


87,497 


12,539 


7,151 


5,388 


952 


146,684 


47,658 


99,026 


133,663 


40,301 


93,362 


13,021 


7,357 


5,664 


953 


155,815 


49,517 


106,298 


142,438 


42,238 


100,200 


13,377 


7,279 


6,098 


954 


164,978 


51,696 


113,282 


151,448 


44,109 


107,339 


13,530 


7,587 


5,943 



* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 

t Grades 7 and 8 were included in the high school beginning in 1946; at this same time the change from an eleven- 
ear to a twelve-year system was begun in the public schools of nineteen counties. 
For detail, see TABLES II. Ill, IV, and V. 



«2 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 5— Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: State 

of Maryland : 1945-1954 



Year 


Total 


PUBLICf 


Ending 














June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 



Nonpublic 



Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL WHITE 



1945 


289,402 


115,289 


174,113 


234,054 


79,552 


154,502 


55,348 


35,737 


19,611 


1946 


290,037 


113,021 


177,016 


232,959 


77,086 


155,873 


57,078 


35,935 


21,143 


1947 


293,926 


112,648 


181,278 


1 234,463 


76,471 


157,992 


59,463 


36,177 


23,286 


1948 


303,912 


114,688 


189,224 i 


I 241,251 


77,702 


163,549 


62,661 


36,986 


25,675 


1949 


317,344 


116,220 


201,124 


252,463 


78,762 


173,701 


64,881 


37,458 


27,423 


1950 


336,196 


118,071 


218,125 


269,070 


80,140 


188,930 


67,126 


37,931 


29,195 


1951 


360,258 


120,646 


239,612 


289,473 


82,165 


207,308 


70,785 


38,481 


32,304 


1952 


380,416 


122,658 


257,757 


305,650 


83,695 


221,955 


74,765 


38,963 


35,802 


1953 


406,893 


127,265 


279,628 


328,176 


87,558 


240,618 


78,717 


39,707 


39,010 


1954 


436,126 


130,266 


304,860 


351,710 


89,125 


262,585 


83,416 


41,141 


42,275 



WHITE ELEMENTARY 



1945 


223,858 


92,309 


131,549 


179,580 


62,969 


116,611 


44,278 


29,340 


14,938 


1946 


198,358 


79,779 


118,579 


162,630 


50,482 


102,148 


46,728 


29,297 


16,431 


1947 


199,229 


79,468 


119,771 1 


151,491 


49,707 


101,784 


47,738 


29,751 


17,987 


1948 


207,227 


80,947 


126,280 


156,863 


51,073 


105,790 


50,364 


29,874 


20,490 


1949 


217,916 


82,871 


135,045 


165,402 


52,406 


112,996 


62,514 


30,465 


22,049 


1950 


230,659 


84,335 


146,324 


175,502 


53,280 


122,222 


55,157 


31,055 


24,102 


1951 


243,916 


85,689 


158,227 


185,451 


54,171 


131,280 1 


58,465 


31,518 


26,947 


1952 


258,213 


87,176 


171,037 


196,258 


55,392 


140,866 j 


61,955 


31,784 


30,171 


1953 


278,025 


91,270 


186,755 


212,451 


58,644 


153,807 | 


65,574 


32,626 


32,948 


1964 


299,004 


93,314 


205,690 


228,890 


69,669 


169,321 


70,114 


33,746 


36,369 



WHITE HIGH 



1945. 
1946. 
1947. 
19 48. 
1949. 
1950. 
1951. 
1952. 
1953. 
1954 



65,544 
91,679 
94,697 
96,685 
99,428 
105,537 
116,342 
122,202 
128,868 
136,122 



22,980 
33,242 
33,190 
33,741 
33,349 
33,736 
34,957 
85,482 
35,995 
36,952 



42,564 
58,437 
61,507 
62,944 
66,079 
71,801 
81,385 
86,720 
92,873 
99,170 



54,474 
80,329 
82,972 
84,388 
87,061 
93,568 
104,022 
109,392 
115,726 
122,820 



16,583 
26,604 
26,764 
26,629 
26,356 
26,860 
27,994 
28,303 
28,914 
29,556 



37,891 
53,725 
56,208 
57,759 
60,705 
66,708 
76,028 
81,089 
86,811 
93,264 



11,070 
11,350 
11,725 
12,297 
12,367 
11,969 
12,320 
12,810 
13,143 
13,302 



6,397 
6,638 
6,426 
7,112 
6,993 
6,876 
6,963 
7,179 
7,081 
7,396 



* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



TABLE 6 Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: State 

of Maryland: 1945-1954 



Year 


Total 


PUBLICt 


Nonpublic 


Endinc 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL COLORED 



945 


64,808 


35,747 


29,061 


62,700 


34,269 


28,431 


2,108 


1,478 


630 


946 


66,858 


37,034 


29,824 


64,631 


35,465 


29,166 


2,227 


1,569 


658 


947 


69,177 


38,295 


30,882 


66,710 


36,678 


30,032 


2,467 


1,617 


850 


948 


71,479 


39,762 


31,717 


68,898 


38,023 


30,875 


2,581 


1,739 


842 


949 


73,523 


40,484 


33,039 


70,940 


38,714 


32,226 


2,583 


1,770 


813 


950 


77,535 


43,004 


34,531 


74,853 


41,225 


33,628 


2,682 


1,779 


903 


951 


80,747 


44,490 


36,257 


78,059 


42,783 


35,276 


2,688 


1,707 


981 


952 


83,825 


46,662 


37,163 


81,074 


44,987 


36,087 


2,751 


1,675 


1,076 


953 


88,650 


50,064 


38,586 


86,007 


48,377 


37,630 


2,643 


1,687 


956 


954 


94,303 


54,487 


39,816 


91,628 


52,755 


38,873 


2,675 


1,732 


943 



COLORED ELEMENTARY 



945 


55,578 


31,753 


23,825 


53,698 


30,503 


23,195 


1,880 
1 2,016 


1,250 


630 


946 


51,868 


29,044 


22,824 


49,852 


27,686 


22,166 


1,358 


658 


947 


52,592 


29,448 


23,144 


50,312 


28,018 


22,294 


2,280 


1,430 


850 


948 


53,998 


30,539 


23,459 


51,642 


28,996 


22,646 


2,356 


1,543 


813 


949 


55,122 


31,033 


24,089 


52,771 


29,466 


23,305 


! 2,351 


1,567 


784 


950 


57,220 


32,661 


24,559 


54,813 


31,121 


23,692 


! 2,407 


1,540 


867 


951 


58,124 


33,367 


24,757 


55,655 


31,848 


23,807 


2,469 


1,519 


950 


952 


59,343 


34,486 
36,542 


24,857 


56,803 


32,989 


23,814 


2,540 


1,497 


1,043 


953 


61,703 


25,161 


59,294 


35,053 


24,241 


, 2,409 


1,489 


920 


954 


65,447 


39,743 


25,704 


63,000 


38,202 


24,798 


2,447 


1,541 


906 



COLORED HIGH 



945 


9,230 


3,994 


5,236 


9,002 


3,766 


5,236 


228 


228 ! 




946 


14,990 


7,990 


7,000 


14,779 


7,779 


7,000 


211 


211 




947 


16,585 


8,847 


7,738 


16,398 


8,660 


7,738 


187 


187 




948 


17,481 


9,223 


8,258 


17,256 


9,027 


8,229 


225 


196 


29 


949 


18,401 


9,451 


8,950 


18,169 


9,248 


8,921 
9,936 


232 


203 i 


29 


950 


20,315 


10,343 


9,972 


20,040 


10,104 


275 


239 1 


36 


951 


22,623 


11,123 


11,500 


22,404 


10,935 


11,469 


219 


188 ! 


31 


952 


24,482 


12,176 


12,306 


24,271 


11,998 


12,273 


211 


178 ! 


33 


953 


26,947 


13,522 


13,425 


26,713 


13,324 


13,389 


234 


198 


36 


954 


28,856 


14,744 


14,112 


28,628 


14,553 


14,075 


228 


m 


37 



* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 



H4 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 7 

Program for Education of Handicapped Children in Maryland Financed with State Funds 
by Year 1952-54; by County and Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1954 





Total 


Home Teaching 


Transporta- 
tion to Regu- 
lar Classes 


Instruction in 
Schools 


Special 


Ybar and County 
















Pupils 






Pu- 
pils 


Expendi- 
tures 


Pu- 
pils 


Teach- 
ers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Pu- 
pils 


Expendi- 
tures 


Baltimore 
City Hos- 
pital 
Schools 


Other 
Schools 


Expendi- 
tures 



BY YEAR 



1951 


-52 


988 $136,397.50 


548 


201 


$57,572.49 


66 


$5,621.17 


258 


119 


$73,203.84 


1952 


-53. 


1,176 185,304.83 


661 


264 


63,850.70 


84 


7,017.70 


256 


178 


114,436.43 


1953 


-54 


1,294 234,925.00 


693 


261 


66,610.73 


84 


7,620.67 


227 


292 


160,693.60 



BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1953-54 



Total State 

Baltimore City . 

Total Counties . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick .... 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. 

Prince George' 
Queen Anne s. 
St. Mary's. . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester . . . . 



1,294 


$234,925.00 


693 


261 


$66,610.73 


430 


99,224.34 


236 


15 


17,152.00 


864 


135,700.66 


457 


246 


49,458.73 


65 


5,302.32 


24 


13 


2,425.52 


113 


10,218.49 


70 


25 


5,436.32 


*216 


42,966.03 


84 


34 


11,068.01 


2 


148.84 


1 


1 


148.84 


6 


560.04 


6 


4 


560.04 


24 


1,967.60 


16 


13 


1,493.92 


17 


1,823.66 


9 


9 


1,223.66 


15 


930.08 


13 


7 


793.36 


5 


928.00 


5 


2 


928.00 


22 


1,826.60 


8 


8 


1,797.00 


11 


831.57 


5 


4 


432.08 


41 


3,300.18 


34 


21 


1,800.18 


23 


3,427.84 


8 


9 


547.84 


6 


455.56 


6 


6 


455.56 


105 


33,905.39 


49 


25 


7,312.39 


117 


18,398.22 


74 


34 


7,306.31 


7 


800.00 








11 


1,192.00 


ii 


2 


1,192.00 


*7 


594.04 


2 


2 


211.00 


6 


375.01 


2 


2 


253.01 


19 


2,786.12 


10 


2 


2,486.12 


18 


2,333.73 


13 


12 


958.23 


8 


629.34 


7 


11 


629.34 



84 



75 



13 



$7,620.67 

1,721.15 

5,899.52 

2,276.80 
197.17 
1,284.68 



73.68 
136.72 

29.60 
399.49 



820.84 



383.04 
122.00 



175.50 



227 

74 

153 

16 
23 
42 
1 



292 
111 
181 



$160,693.60 

J80.351.19 

80,342.41 

600.00 
4,585.00 
30,613.34 



400.00 
600.00 



1,500.00 
2,880.00 



26,593.00 



10,271.07 
800.00 



300.00 
1,200.00 



* Total number of pupils excludes one duplicate in both home teaching and transportation in each of the following 
counties: Baltimore and Somerset. 

t Includes $61,193.02 spent from Funds for Handicapped Children to send 292 children to special schools. 

j Includes $19,158.17 paid by State toward the salaries for the instruction of 227 children in Baltimore City Hospital 
schools, of whom 74 were from Baltimore City and 153 from the counties. 

Note: These pupils are in addition to those reported in special classes in TABLES 18, 19, and 20. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



TABLE 8 



Special Classes and Schools: Baltimore City: Semester Ending June 30, 1954 



Kind of Class or School 


Number of 
Classes 


Net Roll 


Average 
Net Roll 


Per Cent of 
Attendance 


PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 


Deaf 

Cerebral Palsy 

Mixed* 


22 
6 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 


312 
112 
48 
41 
36 
33 
42 


313 
110 
49 
42 
37 
34 
41 


88.6 
90.0 
85.0 
84.0 
90.0 
89.0 
92.0 


PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 


Total and Average 

Orthopedic 

Sight Conservation 

Deaf 

Cerebral Palsy 

Mixed* 


11 
4 

3 

1 
1 


162 
78 
45 
12 
11 
9 
7 


165 
79 
44 
13 
12 
10 
7 


87.9 
86.0 
91.2 
89.0 
88.0 
85.0 
90.0 


SOCIALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 


Highwood School (White) 

Bragg School (Colored) 


4 
1 


49 
16 


48 
16 


77.3 
70.9 


MENTALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 




95 
58 
4 
33 


1,820 
1,147 

50 
623 


1,832 
1,140 
53 
639 


80.4 
84.5 
81.7 
73.0 


MENTALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 


Total and Average 

Opportunity 

Special Center 

Shop Center 


92 
49 
2 
41 


1,957 
1,008 
30 
919 


1,963 
997 
30 
936 


78.8 
83.3 
77.0 
74.0 



* Junior high school classes consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: orthopedic, 29 white, 
3 colored; sight conservation, 6 white, 3 colored; cardiac, 2 white, 1 colored; deaf, 2 white; and hearing 
conservation, 3 white. 



66 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 9— Number of Pupils* 
Atypical Children: 



Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Name and Location 


Number of Pupils 


Total 
Number 
of 

Different 
Teachers 


Kinder- 
garten 


Ele- 
mentary- 


Secondary 


Special 


WHITE 









29 


4 








6 


2 








56 


9 








20 


4 








6 


1 


17 


70 


20 




18 


15 


102 


23 




18 




284 


87 




13 




37 


58 




9 








28 


4 








30 


2 


65 


102 






12 








52 


10 








8 


2 








31 


4 



Child Study Center, Baltimore 

Children's Guild, Baltimore 

Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 

Cockeysville 

Friendly School, Baltimore 

Garden School, Baltimore 

Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore 

Maryland School for Deaf, Frederick 

Maryland Training School for Boys, 

1 och Raven 

Montrose School for Girls, Reisterstown .... 
Nursery School for Cerebral Palsy, Baltimore 

Reinhardt School for Deaf, Kensington 

Rosewood State Training School, 

Owings Mills 

School of Chimes, Baltimore 

Sunnyday School. Bethesda 

Twin Maples, Baltimore 



COLORED 



Barrett School for Girls, Glen Burnie 




12 


33 




9 


Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., Cheltenham. 




162 






9 




*7 


28 


2 




7 


Dept. for Colored Deaf 


1 


18 


5 




7 



* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



6 7 



TABLE 10— Total Resident Births in Maryland : 1944-1953 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


Total State 


43,763 


42,816 


50,733 


56,827 


54,092 


54,048 


55,992 


61,081 


63,165 


64,523 


L'.llL 11. '. \ > l V, V-zILjf . . . 


18 830 


17 848 


21 111 


23 992 


22 083 


21 496 


21 382 




22 775 


22 748 


Total Counties . . . 


24,933 


24,968 


29,622 


32,835 


32,009 


32,552 


34,610 


38,451 


40,390 


41,775 


Allegany 


1,689 


1,724 


2,257 


2,554 


2,160 


2,009 


1,803 


1,824 


1,785 


1,729 


Anne Arundel . . 


1,857 


1,819 


2,164 


2,474 


2,603 


2,655 


2,873 


2,969 


3,132 


3,444 


Baltimore 


5,112 


5,174 


6,140 


6,867 


6,375 


6,379 


6,661 


7,489 


7,937 


8,547 


Calvert 


280 


312 


313 


361 


395 


366 


400 


405 


427 


432 




349 


329 


387 


405 


420 


373 


417 


396 


432 


431 


Carroll 


667 


708 


860 


978 


887 


849 


771 


818 


1,019 


888 


Cecil 


682 


702 


804 


788 


790 


763 


756 


801 


901 


958 




628 


605 


672 


686 


723 


723 


746 


782 


684 


825 




482 


462 


526 


613 


574 


555 


559 


630 


585 


597 




1,087 


1,141 


1,405 


1,478 


1,339 


1,377 


1,342 


1,464 


1,438 


1,430 


Garrett 


464 


424 


515 


568 


551 


541 


530 


508 


497 


467 


Harford 


1,171 


1,090 


1,245 


1,385 


1,353 


1,379 


1,419 


1,645 


1,789 


1,724 


Howard 


420 


381 


477 


565 


546 


542 


569 


597 


581 


615 


Kent 


300 


246 


295 


327 


293 


299 


313 


285 


318 


317 


Montgomery . . . 


2,674 


2,694 


3,073 


3,411 


3,600 


4,000 


4,740 


5,478 


6,113 


6,275 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 


2,984 


2,992 


3,804 


3,996 


4,243 


4,563 


5,508 


7,020 


7,250 


7,566 


239 


260 


269 


289 


313 


326 


311 


298 


334 


279 




569 


708 


679 


736 


781 


824 


883 


916 


881 


1,029 


Somerset 


374 


357 


414 


484 


432 


417 


436 


432 


446 


427 


Talbot 


330 


330 


363 


425 


415 


418 


427 


435 


458 


451 


Washington .... 


1,504 


1,467 


1,730 


1,989 


1,791 


1,760 


1,697 


1,714 


1,794 


1,771 


Wicomico 


671 


636 


741 


875 


892 


866 


894 


980 


1,002 


1,019 


Worcester 


400 


407 


489 


581 


533 


568 


555 


565 


587 


554 



68 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 11— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1944-1953 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



White Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


Total State 


35,554 


34,678 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


47,992 


50,146 


50,918 


Baltimore City . . . 


14,021 


13,308 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


14,938 


14,989 


14,628 


Total Counties . . . 


21,533 


21,370 


25,596 


28,525 


27,237 


27,671 


29,431 


33,054 


35,157 


36,290 


Allegany 


1,665 


1,691 


2,221 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


1,792 


1,758 


1,691 


Anne Arundel . . 


1,442 


1,392 


1,693 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 


2,322 


2,467 


2,734 


Baltimore 


4,862 


4,751 


5,643 


6,328 


6,737 


5,766 


6,036 


6,932 


7,382 


7,999 


Calvert 


116 


156 


137 


156 


179 


168 


148 


160 


186 


196 


Caroline 


265 


248 


302 


310 


323 


276 


319 


300 


325 


313 


Carroll 


626 


666 


816 


930 


840 


805 


725 


778 


922 


840 


Cecil 


638 


652 


748 


735 


717 


707 


695 


737 


834 


883 


Charles 


341 


304 


386 


394 


405 


390 


407 


397 


387 


457 


Dorchester 


318 


298 


360 


412 


368 


324 


317 


350 


342 


324 


Frederick 


979 


1,029 


1,254 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 


1,304 


1,306 


1,282 


Garrett 


464 


424 


515 


565 


550 


541 


529 


507 


497 


466 


Harford 


1,059 


994 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 


1,426 


1,557 


1,493 


Howard 


354 


317 


389 


477 


426 


443 


463 


480 


480 


499 


Kent 


210 


166 


214 


240 


216 


211 


231 


204 


224 


209 


Montgomery . . . 


2,459 


2,463 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


5,122 


5,794 


5,899 


Prince George's. 


2,532 


2,529 


3,273 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


6,157 


6,430 


6,705 


Queen Anne's . . 


170 


178 


196 


208 


213 


211 


200 


197 


231 


190 


St. Mary's 


388 


540 


475 


557 


564 


615 


659 


690 


675 


812 


Somerset 


209 


199 


256 


297 


256 


217 


240 


226 


243 


223 


Talbot 


210 


220 


235 


296 


271 


282 


290 


281 


293 


301 


Washington. . . . 


1,479 


1,451 


1,702 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 


1,684 


1,769 


1,731 


Wicomico 


501 


471 


571 


684 


663 


633 


628 


686 


733 


735 


Worcester 


246 


231 


306 


375 


326 


329 


325 


322 


322 


308 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 12— Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1944-1953 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 



Colored Resident Births in Maryland 





1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


Total State 


8,209 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


13,089 


13,019 


13,605 


Baltimore City 


4,809 


4,540 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


7,214 


7,692 


7,786 


8 120 


Total Counties . . . 


3,400 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


4,881 


5,179 


5,397 


5,233 


5,485 


Allegany 


24 


33 


36 


30 


34 


33 


34 


32 


27 


38 


Anne Arundel . . 


415 


427 


471 


531 


583 


621 


677 


647 


665 


710 


Baltimore 


250 


423 


497 


539 


638 


613 


625 


557 


555 


548 


Calvert 


164 


156 


176 


205 


216 


198 


252 


245 


241 


236 


Caroline 


84 


81 


85 


95 


97 


97 


98 


96 


107 


118 


Carroll 


41 


42 


44 


48 


47 


44 


46 


40 


97 


48 


Cecil 


44 


50 


56 


53 


73 


56 


61 


64 


67 


75 


Charles 


287 


301 


286 


292 


318 


333 


339 


385 


297 


368 


Dorchester 


164 


164 


166 


201 


206 


231 


242 


280 


243 


273 


Frederick 


108 


112 


151 


140 


143 


144 


153 


160 


132 


148 


Garrett 








3 


1 




1 


1 




1 


Harford 


112 


96 


112 


141 


167 


177 


178 


219 


232 


231 


Howard 


66 


64 


88 


88 


120 


99 


106 


117 


101 


116 


Kent 


90 


80 


81 


87 


77 


88 


82 


81 


94 


108 


Montgomery . . . 


215 


231 


302 


297 


311 


336 


338 


356 


319 


376 


Prince George's. 


452 


463 


531 


548 


638 


645 


733 


863 


820 


861 


Queen Anne's . . 


69 


82 


73 


81 


100 


115 


111 


101 


103 


89 


St. Mary's 


181 


168 


204 


179 


217 


209 


224 


226 


206 


217 


Somerset 


165 


158 


158 


187 


176 


200 


196 


206 


203 


204 


Talbot 


120 


110 


128 


129 


144 


136 


137 


154 


165 


150 


Washington .... 


25 


16 


28 


39 


30 


34 


50 


30 


25 


40 


Wicomico 


170 


165 


170 


191 


229 


233 


266 


294 


269 


284 


Worcester 


154 


176 


183 


206 


207 


239 


230 


243 


265 


246 



70 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 13 

Withdrawals* from Public Schools : Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1954 







Withdrawals by CoDEf 


County 


Total 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


























Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


W10 


Wll 


W12 


W14 



ELEMENTARY 



Total Counties 


19,175 


7,063 


396 


11,032 


58 


31 


136 




25 


16 


394 


24 








660 


341 


15 


276 


o 
& 


q 
o 


Q 








20 








Anne Arundel 


1,692 


461 


19 


1,141 


15 


1 


8 




4 


"l 


34 


2 






Baltimore 


3,019 


977 


32 


1,919 


8 


8 


17 








57 


1 






Calvert 


174 


69 


6 


89 


2 




1 




"i 




6 






Caroline 


189 


51 




122 


3 








2 




11 








Carroll 


382 


114 


1 


251 


1 




1 




1 




13 








Cecil 


563 


174 




382 


2 


2 


2 








1 








Charles 


349 


150 


" 2 


181 


2 








4 




10 








Dorchester 


133 


40 




84 


1 












7 








Frederick 


526 


260 


' 6 


239 


3 


i 










17 








Garrett 


185 


58 


1 


112 










3 




11 








Harford 


1,164 


399 


1 


719 


i 


2 


3 






1 


38 








Howard 


329 


58 




258 


1 




1 






1 


10 








Kent 


109 


15 




88 


1 








i 




4 








Montgomery 


3,905 


1,822 


226 


1,741 


4 


3 


43 




2 


3 


44 


i7 






Prince George's . . . 


3,295 


1,053 


59 


2,113 


6 


4 


19 




1 




40 








161 


45 


1 


115 






















St. Mary's 


471 


73 


15 


374 


i 




2 








6 








Somerset 


112 


32 




71 










1 




7 








Talbot 


165 


64 


' 2 


90 


2 


i 










5 








Washington 


880 


571 


8 


236 




4 


29 






2 


27 


3 






Wicomico 


458 


192 


2 


234 


3 


2 


5 




5 


1 


14 








Worcester 


254 


44 




197 












1 


12 









HIGH 



Total Counties 


8,918 


1,071 


59 


3,114 


172 


34 


137 


145 


3,268 


25 


429 


61 


397 


6 


Allegany 


450 


54 


8 


134 


5 


1 


5 


17 


169 


1 


24 


3 


29 




Anne Arundel 


857 


56 


5 


336 


22 


1 


7 


16 


328 


2 


50 


2 


32 




Baltimore 


1,576 


128 


12 


543 


36 


3 


50 


20 


623 


5 


70 


26 


60 




Calvert 


110 




1 


39 


1 


1 


3 




55 




5 


1 


4 




Caroline 


108 


i5 




30 








2 


50 




7 




2 




Carroll 


271 


44 


1 


86 


4 


1 


6 


2 


104 


2 


11 


1 


7 


2 


Cecil 


257 


22 


2 


106 


3 


3 


3 


2 


99 


1 


4 




11 


1 


Charles 


199 


26 




63 


2 




2 


2 


82 


1 


17 




4 




Dorchester 


108 


7 




31 


6 




9 


2 


36 


1 


7 


*4 


5 




Frederick 


325 


61 


' i 


79 


4 




1 


2 


149 


2 


12 


2 


12 




Garrett 


114 


6 




53 


2 






4 


38 




6 




5 




Harford 


432 


40 




190 


3 


i 


i 


2 


147 


2 


18 


i 


27 




Howard 


183 


6 


"i 


75 






1 


4 


78 




11 


3 


4 




Kent 


88 


4 




25 


2 


i 


6 


1 


35 


i 


10 


3 








956 


204 


'io 


379 


20 


7 


23 


13 


214 


2 


42 


1 


41 




Prince George's . . . 


1,484 


172 


6 


603 


35 


7 


8 


37 


501 




43 




72 




113 


6 




44 










40 


3 


3 


8 


9 




St. Mary's 


212 


70 


* i 


54 


2 




2 


5 


58 




8 


1 


5 




Somerset 


109 


5 


5 


18 


1 




3 


4 


50 




10 


5 


8 




Talbot 


74 


6 




17 


3 






2 


35 




5 




5 




Washington 


551 


121 




98 


14 


6 


3 


4 


253 


1 


26 




24 


1 


Wicomico 


185 


13 




57 


5 


1 


3 


4 


65 


1 


20 




16 




Worcester 


156 


5 




54 






1 




59 




20 




15 


1 



* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1953-54 the school from which they withdrew, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county; W6 — Armed services; 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic school in county; W8 — Age 16 or over; 

W3 & 4 — Transferred — Outside county; W9 — Mental; 

W7 — Committed to institution; W10 — Physical; 

W13— Death; Wll— Economic; 

W5 — Special case; W12 — Marriage; 

Wl 4 — Suspended. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



TABLE 14 

Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: by Year — Counties of 
Maryland: 1945-54: by County— State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal 



Year 












White Schools 


Colored Schools 


County 












Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1944-45 


36.0 


23.1 


36.1 


24.3 


1945-46 


35.2 


23.5 


35.7 


25.5 


1946 47 


34.6 


22.8 


35.4 


24.4 


1947-48 


33.9 


21.6 


35.6 


23.1 


1948-49 


34.0 


21 .6 


34.7 


22.7 


1949-50 


34.0 


21.9 


35.1 


22.5 


1950-51 


33.7 


21.9 


34.7 


21.2 


1951-52 


32.1 


21 .5 


33.2 


20.9 


1952-53 


31.4 


21.6 


32.0 


21 .2 


1953-54 


31.0 


21.8 


31.4 


20.7 


BY COUNTY, 1953-54 


Total State 


31.0 


21.6 


33.3 


23.1 


Baltimore City 


31.2 


21.0 


34.7 


25.9 


Total Counties 


31.0 


21.8 


31.4 


20.7 




28.7 


23.1 


31.5 


18.3 


Anne Arundel 


30.7 


22.4 


32.7 


25.0 




30.9 


23.9 


29.8 


20.1 


Calvert 


29.2 


20.7 


30.9 


20.1 


Caroline 


29.5 


18.1 


32.1 


17.1 


Carroll 


32.4 


19.7 


40.3 


20.1 


Cecil 


33.2 


19.3 


30.9 


18.7 


Charles 


29.0 


19.0 


30.7 


20.1 


Dorchester 


29.6 


19.0 


33.9 


22.3 


Frederick 


36.9 


22.0 


34.8 


24.1 


Garrett 


27.6 


22.4 








33.9 


23.3 


37 .i 


i9.5 




30.1 


18.7 


30.7 


19.9 


Kent 


28.1 


18.6 


30.2 


18.2 




30.4 


20.7 


31.4 


19.1 




31.4 


22.6 


29.4 


21.3 


Queen Anne's 


28.8 


18.1 


30.8 


18.8 


St. Mary's 


30.0 


23.0 


32.7 


20.0 


Somerset 


27.1 


18.9 


32.1 


19.5 


Talbot 


27.8 


20.7 


29.6 


20.0 




31.6 


21.7 


29.1 


15.8 


Wicomico 


33.2 


24.8 


30.7 


22.3 


Worcester 


30.3 


18.3 


32.5 


20.3 



* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



72 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



53 c 
•3 £ 
c t. 



3g 



OOirHtOCO>-ili5inNN 

oon eg*o*x*eg* o>ip*g 



Cg©XX©WXC~lOrH 

oo © o> io 05 © iqiqaq 
eg* co" CO* i-T of co* io ©" t> 



xo"5rHrH00rHT)«egt-co 
o^itooot-cftcoojai^i 



o cc io n t- n a: io 



OOiOHOJ-iKit-OO) 

t- t)< eo ©.'n 0< *L Oi . t> .'~l , ~l 
of eo*©*©"r-"eg*Tj*to* oo*o* 

rHrHegcgcgegCgCgCO 



HOWINiOi-it^NOrt 
eg co_ t> eg 04 OJ rH l> "* 
co* cm* eg* co* <# to* x* of <-<* co* 
egogogegegegegegcoeo 



i-j oq t~ x_ eq oq o eg o_ oc 
n* co* co*-*" to* t-*o*-H*co*to* 
egegcgegegegcgcococo 



■^fotototo-fcgtoooio 
R p *; "*L "*L *"". "**. "*L "i. cq °. 

© iO*iO*tO* X* O*rt»b"o" 

cgcgcgcgcgcgcoeoeo'^ , 



-*o>cgcot>c505coc50 



t-tDt-t-O) WCOOOOO 

OHiHOr-ltOOftU 1 

iq to O ©_ CC t> tO_ t> uq 

t~ t>* of of ih eg" t- of x* o 
(^^cg(^lcgcoeocococo'^• 



rHrH©iOTj<o5cgxegeo 
Ttt>iO'-<toiocgoa>Oi 
io eg rn o x^05 ©_co_x 
©* rncf eg* ce*©*x*x*©*io* 
cocococococococO'^^ , 



octo^Ht-t>-i<cgotoo5 

WlOOiS'* lOOOXOCO 

oq eg rH « t> © cq © eq cc 
io*©^*eo"x©"x*cf ©*eo* 
cococococo-<j , eoTi<'*io 



©©©xxxmio©© 

**. "R. "*i "i. ""I "**. ~S> °1 °l 

to* to* t>" o*oi*o o* eo"x"t> 



o-^o-'fto^H-^ococg 
xmco'^rHco©©©© 
°l ""1 e0 . **i *^. °1 „ "H. 

©©* T»* CO* t>* 05* OO* O* 05* 00* 

t>ooooo5oeg^ , t~05eg 
cgcgcgcgcoeococoeoT)« 



rj<iotot>ooo50i-icgco 

TfTj<r}<T}<T}<Tj<lOlOlOlO 

05050505050505050505 



rHt-O5©O5©t~©©C0 

o »q ej to oo^ to ■«* 
co* ©* uj -*j<* co* co* co* co* co" co* 



nuJO)0<oooof oto 



OClOOOit-Ot 



cg^ooootooviooeooo 
egxiocg©t-e»xt-c~ 
eg -q oq « ea oq »q eq oq co 
rHr-*r-*©* oo* rH* eg" co* co* io* 



t^t>©-#io-<j<in--too 
ootoeg-HCO'i'coocosTt 
t^oc to c>j_co ^^^io eo 
eo* co* -h* 05* co* tj<* ©* to* t>* of 



ioegcgt^tot~T-iosasto 
to^too5i-i-^<a5t^coio 

OrHO^'^lO'J'NCOtO 



ocgioco'^ot^co'^'eg 

rH©05X"tf 1 <i , rH©e005 



itOO> 

t> ©_ « in c j © ih iq rH 
oc* oc" oo* oo* of rH* eg* co* ■<*" to" 
____(_egcgegegcg 



cgt~m©©t-©t-XrH 

rHO5XO5©X©©e0© 

^HOct>Tj«t>05cootoeg 



Tfoocoioej— iototooc 
eg"0t^to<-noo5tocoio 



toego5toooiOi-irj<oo 
loojiotocot^mtocio 
cocotOi-<eoxioo-^'t- 



SNHwtoncooooo 
Tfegoegr-100 05-^'0005 
^Hcg»Hcoc-ocoeoegto 



osTjwosogcomo-^to 
toiotoiOTfoooosegai 
CJ5coegt>e•Jt>too5^0'a , 



totor-itotoioeg'^tocg 
t-ioiocgocoocast^io 
toeo<-n>05c0'-itototo 



i>to--^oegtoooTj<eg 
o\ oo^ eg^ 05_ o\ tq_ tq_ io 
tj<* io* io* t-* t>* t>* c-* o* co" eg* 



totoooi-icgeot-tooo 

HOOft-Tft-HHO 

ih «H oj t>^ w o> o o oq eo_ 
oo" 05" ^h" 00* 05* t>* lO* CO* tJ* 06* 
^-n-iegegcoioc-05>-ieo 
egegegegegegegeacoco 



Tf^TjlTTTfTflOlOlOlO 
OSoS0505050i05050505 



oocoeioocokOiOb-t-Hi-t 
t-Tf»j"ioo50JO>ooe-iei 
co^ t- iq iq to^ to_ 
co* co* co* eg* eg* eg* eg" eg* eg" 



cgeocg©iOi-ii-<tD''J , eg 

t- M N !C tD fh N O t- ih 

eacoiOLO^i-itoc^Of-i 



c01-l^-t-co■^ , 05meJ'«l■ 
oooeg»oot-ooo50oco 
^ t> to co_ o o eg »q t> 
-«* ^h* rn* r-T eg* eg* eg* eg* eg* 



toegcioooot^iooooeo 
as CO C5 05 f co o t - C5 
°1 °i **. n - °l °. ""I 
eg* eg* 1-* »-* eg* co* eg* co" co" eo" 



t-<-i<-iaieococomegto 
HHf»o>wmoiHoa 
o_ oj ej eo_ eg oq iq 00 
co" eg" eg* eo* eo" co* eo" -<** ->a* tj* 



oicotot>egcotO'*r-o 
ocoooit-io^ito-^'iot- 
tococot-rH'fc^— • t- cj 



Ot^ONiOC-IMONO) 

05eoeoast>iOrHtO'><j'»-( 
eo to 05 co^^ej 
it* ti<* -^<" t** tj<* 10* ko* to* t-* t> 



OlOfnOlt-OHON 

U5NrttDr-liHlOO>N00 

o oj o co to oqto ^.eq»q 
10* ^* 10* 10* »o* 10* to" t> 1> 



©egeoi-i-^eoegoegt- 
tot>co©05totooco'^' 

00 1- 1> 05 io 00 u q*qcq'*, 

10*10 10 io*to"co"t>"t-*t-*oo* 



Hj<o5ioast>t>05egooo 
ooo5totoeoTHCot^©o 
10 ^ eg «»q>-H tq^o^to^ej 
to* to* to* to* t>* oc* t-" 00* 00* 00* 



OT*totocoeg©ooo>-H 

tOOSrHt-OOOrHOtOlO 

eo^ eo^ oq cq ih tq_ eg rn oo_ 
to* to* to* t>* x* t~* 00 x* x* x* 



egt>totoegtot>xxt- 
iq oq oq to x^ ©^ eq cq x^ co_ 
t> t— * t> x* t>* x* x* x* x* of 



eg©©rHrH05©tD©t- 
Tj«©Tj<LOT»<rH©XCOX 

ej oq cq ©^ oq ih x^ iq rH 

©05O5t-XXXXO5rH 



eoegeg©©ioio©xeg 

©XlO'rl<t>05iOX'^ , 05 

10 10 © rH eg tqcq eqtqeq 

rH* rH* rH* 04* 04 OJ 04* CO*"*" lO* 



"tOOO^WOSHH^f 

xego5©t~«©©rH© 



Tj"iO©t^X©©rHCgX 
T}"Tj<T)<'rJ<r)<'S , iOiOiOiO 
050505050)©050505© 



Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 16 



Number Enrolled by Grade-Color: Maryland Public Schools: Fall of 1953 



Grade 


Total 


White 


Colored 


total state 


Total 


$428,292 


338,308 


89,984 


Kindergarten* 


17,964 


12,572 


5,392 


1 


53,839 


42,652 


11,187 


2 


45,893 


36,496 


9,397 


3 


40,549 


31,698 


8,851 


4 


38,900 


30,700 


8,200 


6 


40,015 


31,568 


8,447 


6 


36,833 


29,251 


7,582 


7 


33,414 


26,195 


7,219 


8 


30,191 


23,921 


6,270 


9 


26,552 


21,656 


4,896 


10 


23,133 


19,340 


3,793 


11 


17,812 


15,078 


2,734 


12t 


14,676 


12,564 


2,112 


Special Classes 


6,054 


3,433 


2,621 


BALTIMORE CITY 


Total 


J138.034 


86,206 


51,828 


Kindergarten* 


12,479 


7,304 


5,175 


1 


16,071 


9,766 


6,305 


2 


13,289 


7,990 


5,299 


8 , 


13,319 


8,202 


5,117 


4 


11,589 


7,062 


4,527 


6 


12,037 


7,429 


4,608 


6 


10,773 


6,843 


3,930 


7 


9,632 


5,969 


3,663 


8 


8,538 


5,365 


3,173 


9 


7,311 


5,043 


2,268 


10 


6,301 


4,582 


1,719 


11 


4,784 


3,529 


1,255 


12t 


3,983 


3,015 


968 


Special Classes 


5,461 


2,923 


2,538 


TOTAL COUNTIES 


Total 


290,258 


252,102 


38,156 


Kindergarten 


5,485 


5,268 


217 


1 


37,768 


32,886 


4,882 


2 


32,604 


28,506 


4,098 


3 


27,230 


23,496 


3,734 


4 


27,311 


23,638 


3,673 


5 


27,978 


24,139 


3,839 


6 


26,060 


22,408 


3,652 


7. : 


23,782 


20,226 


3,556 


8 


21,653 


18,556 


3,097 


9 


19,241 


16,613 


2,628 


10 


16,832 


14,758 


2,074 


11 


13,028 


11,549 


1,479 


12t 


10,693 


9,549 


1,144 


Special Classes 


593 


510 


83 



* Includes enrollment in prekindergarten classes, 
t Includes postgraduates. 

t Includes ungraded vocational pupils: 2,467, total; 1,184 white; 1,283, colored. 



74 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CM 

01 


CO 


oc 
to 


f~ tO Tf" 1-H tO 

O O CM t> CO 


m m to eo 


c l 


© 




0C lOrf rH 00^ 


t> >-^t> eg lO^ 


00 


00* 


© 


in*->i"cM*eo*x* 


0C*t-*l£*in*i-* 


Cl 


CO 


OS 
CM 


i-l CM m 





oo to x cm «-i t- x X »-i as 

COCO (M m OMMOU3 OS 

in OS© 00 i« NOOlfJt- 00 

in" cm* cm* NC0eQ**c0 in" 



i-i^eo-^o cm eo to © as to eo •«$< ,-h m m o on im •*■»< to co 

or t- CO CO 00 H l.O C>1 N to (T Ol -i 1 r-i LC CM OS CO >.0> CO m OS CO 

MO^ot- nt-iooo xfiret^t>co cm as ■«* x cc rtxn 

in cM"t-"co"co" x"to* m" m" h •^"o'-^rc't-" oc*eM*co*eo*«* incc*'<i" 

CM »H i-l CO CO ~* 



OS i-t 
OS CO 
CO r-1 



t- oo ^ h- m oo 

to cm to oo as m 

in oh^mu 

oo m" ©*co*cm"«* 



co in x as in 
as cm M_oc_in 



"r»< CO r- X NOiOCW- 

iin^oa toiocrci- 

^coiotoo oooot^us 

*os*tj<"cm*x" m" cm co* co* co* 



in Oit^cocom xt>.-itocM cm*#c~tj<oo 

i-< to m Tf m m to t> m x cm omcoc-io 

*"i cs l'~l" £ L t> . u: i <o c~ o t> cm t~ i—i co m oo 

■*** in*as*©*cM"x* t— * m" lo" o* tj"os* ■^"cm'oo 



i-IOSXXCO (OOH 

m oc co c^- in f~tocM 

t-H (X t- © Tt>_ |-« 

CM* CM* CM* CO* CO* 

eo ^ 



iH Q Ol CO Ol CM CO O -rf t>CM t- TfNNC* MHCU-JW 

» © as as t x o ci rn to to in to as 1-1 m to to cm x x 

» in eoa^HCeo '"I" . 50 .'*. 00 . '°.' - l l cc . . 0C «" : l" c . u *l Cv i 

?ft m in ^ tn r] M h— 10 n-w tH nrm m in X CM CM X X 



,316 


',801 


i,515 


lOt-HCfttD 

as cm oc © 
i-H as eo_in cm 


o 
co 


c- 
O 


01 


in*m*co*CM*eo" 

iHtHCO 



x m t> © © 
co.-iTj<os o 

t-^^Tf CO^CM 

cc"m*-<j*-<t*a>* 



in-** 

CMoomo^j" 
to to t> co m 



totocococo to m o 
o oc m in oc .-h 

tj*cm*cm"x*x* eo"m"eo* 



** 


os 

CM 


m 


oo —i as to 


to 


t> 




as cc os cm_ 


CO* 


in* 


t> 


^"^"ccmco" 


OS 
CM 


c 


oo 





X CM CM X tH 

oc t- t> eo cm 
m oc i-i eo cm 



CMT»<CMt~CM 
CO O OC ^ © 

in x to eg x^ 
■«i*c-"x"cm"x* 



tr-c3n*^reo x c- as 

m cm as o to casm 

CM ^rfito <J5 . Tl l c ^ 

e>i" cm" cm* co" eo" ciinco* 



rf intoocom x m t> © 1-1 x m x x cm 

r-t CMXt-xcM -* in m m o "<fxt^^c~- 

in osos"*"'* ^ -<r t> c_eo_^ ^<Z5 us cvj^cc 

__i ,— nvi /tn pf rr* nrM r^. nyn nxi n^ 



c- x x © co t- in cm 

Ht-Tf mtoas 

CM^WTreo^CJ t> rcco_ 

«tf*t>*x*CM*t>* i— * cm* cm* co* co* cm* m* co" 

—I CM 



in 


«* 


s 


oooomTf 
as o t- eo cm 


C3 




CM 


tO^Tj^CMtW 0_ 


o 




to 


T^*co*oc*CM*eo* 


X 
01 


c 


t> 





oo cm m i— * as 
eo t> o as t> 
co to o o as 



to to oo i-" m 
as m t- m © 

CM t> Tf rH"* 
rf to* CO* CM* tO* O* CM* CM* CO* CM* 
—i CM 



m ^ to m h cot— 
xceoooc ooas 
t>co-^cooc c- co m 



COOCMOO 00 Tl< t>> X rf 
i-cCM-^XTt tOi-HCO-HCO 

r)«*eo*x"cM"cM* co*Ti*Tj*"!j*as* 



t~tocMCMin tjioso 
as t~- as o t> o m m 
** cm eo x x to cm m 



FH CO f- 



ca c3ajJ=o£ « O <u O 



0- Ceo w E- 



III 
sis 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



01<000>M m O H iji oo t}< CO t~- 01 Tl« "*«HOlW Nt-O 

oincoosco as t- o ^j" oc i-kohoo us oc oc 

OS 1- CO .-i H^NHM irti-Hi-i^HT-i (OWH 



tJ" CO CO 00 OiO(OOiiO 
t-(D(DOO CO OS in t~ O 
OOlHrtCg -fCMCMCMCO 



tj< tj< oj m 

r-IMOH(M 



CM »H i-H O CO CO CO 

in «-i «* eot-oouj 
m co cm co in m cm cm 



m CM CO CM 00 

iotji «co t- 



co i-i co co 
in t}< o> co cm 
co ^* co co os 



CM CO Tf CM CO O OS X CM irti-iCO 

Mcti'trt t-cccoa>o co •"i" cm 

N>oea*Hua x-h^h^cm opeeei 



^ICOXOt- CO CO 00 

ciosococm a. oias 

5* y-i 0J CM CM O TC M 



t-coooco^i< 
com-^oocM 

C0t>C0«-<CM 



CO OJ CO CM OS H0CU5 

coou-fco cmosoi 

t-CMIMCMCM CM CO 



ascsxosx ^cocoast- cocom^-crr 

CO CO i-H "t O CMCOTfi-iCO OSXCMCMO 

co oc cm cm co t~ in os cMoccccMin 



N CO O lO H 

inccco— ias 

OS CM CM CO CM 



CM CO i-H 

CO OC CO 

cm m co 



coo-^ocm co x cm m t~ 
coo^cmco t-ww<f co 



i— I OS OS 

OS ■«* CM 00 



OB CO tHCM-<* 



^KOOM 

CM-<f o i-i m 



cm in t>< x 
in m f-H o co 



in co co os t~- 
m os os th »h 

t-OOSHTf 



CM CM CM CO OJHO 

oioa>t-(0 t- os 

CO CM CM CO CO CO i-h CO 



WHTflDO 0)050 
CO CM O! CM O OS O 00 

oc cm cm m m co co t- 



NXOSHH CO CM CM CM H Tl< i 



O t"- CO OS i— < ^* 

co os co as i-h cm 

o_ cm^cm^co co 

CO HNTf 



^ o as oo cm 
in o co co o 
co m cm co 



cm c- i-h cm m 



cm oo in m i-i 

TjicM'-HOsCO 
CMTj< OCMCO 



os i-h m t- in 
co as co co co 
CM cm os co co 



mommas 

rHCDCCt-r-l 

m os as co ^ 



w^Tfcoco 
t- m oc as 

t> 'cf O CO 



t> oo t~ o m 
?-H co in cm cm 
oo co m m o 



HHU3SN 

as t- m m o 



m co m m as 
coos moco 
co in in o 



ost-coasos t^mmo 
co oc as rt« m 1-ioocmoco 

•*Ji O CM CM t> CM CO Tj« CO 



C7)N10t-H 
CM X C~ CM 
NtJ CM CO_ 

«-H CO 



co o -* m co 

rH CM CO"* CO 



co as cm Tj" t~- as cm cm t- cm 

CMOSXXCM COOl-HOtO 

T)< ^1 Tj" CvJ OC rH CM "0< *<* CO 



fl 1-1 08 



t-Ht^OCO 

t- in rr o 



oast- co-* 
miOHOco 
as oo co m cm 



cm as t)< t> co 

Ot-HNW 

oas t> co co 



O CO OS CO ■<* ONHO00 

wtt-xcM as o cm cm m 

TfH^NO O CO "f CO 



t~ i-H CO CO -<* t-H!COO 

co x o t> oo ascMCMmoo 
'jf wwt- ocom-tco 



ocomcocM cMommoo 
ococcMTfm xncich 
■* co co co ocomm-f 



CO t>T}< 

CM—ICM 

m t> rf 



HOC) 
OS CO 
CO t- I 1 



OS t-t> 

x-* 
co c- f 



co co c- 

CO t-'f 



co as 
m co co 
co c- Tj< 



mco t- 
oc as m 



CM 

i-h m 



^ji t> h- coi-it»<obi-i co t~ m o co osCMoasm co co cm -h ocom 

co co co cocmcmcoco co a. -h in co rf i-ir-oco co in co x in cccm 

id si n ino_Tj<o^co_ cm in co_i-m os_ oc .°. t ~.' - l cc . 0C . to .' :c . Cv i l °.'~l. 00 . 

o ^ m x co co cm cm m co co co cm co <-h o t-i-HCMCMCM osmcM 



Grand 
Total 


,292 


,034 


,258 


t~ CO — 1 CO 
O O CM CO 
XWtT h X^ 


OlHOUJt- 

m m co co 
t- i-h t> cm m_ 


Tl< X CO X CM 

o o co cm m 
in oso^in 


1-1 t> X X 

ONNOO 

c^j o_^cn cm_i> 


as m m 
as t~ o 

X_t* CO^ 


X 
CM 


X 
M 


o 

3) 
CM 


m cm co co 
-h cm m 




iH m CM CM 


CM CO CO CO 


m t> 



. o u~ 



S.2 



1 w ^ t 



_ 1- 1- 

0) O CO ^ 
^ C 
S3 « O 0) 



is-c 

ft c 



to ww- u 3 jj r» 03 



^§2 
.5 eg 



: co os c 
coco- 

>^HCM. 



• ■ <- o_ 

S3 .2 

.5 — a 

co O i-i cn 

P s « 



o 2? 



ago 



w 



c a, <J> « 1 « 5? 

_5 o— a n cm 
. >» < §ox u JS« 

l|.2§ .-SSp>»! 



MCQ 11312 



76 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



v. v. 



2 A 



TP CO tO »-< 00 t- 05t-TPCM^ TP 05 CM CO CM CO CO 00 t- t- lO tC t- 
CO 05 O CO CO CO t-- LO CM CO TP t-St^OCO NOOlOl^ 00 CM CO 

m oo co lo —i WNHH^t ^co—i cm -p.— h icnh 



CO 00 00 CM CO 
tCCOTPt-t~ 
OSO i-H 



—I 00 t- O —I 
rtt-tOON 



CM t~ 05 tP CO 
CM CO O O C J 
CM Tp r-< —I Tf 



05 TP CM TP LO CO ( 

TPCMeOr-ITP TP LO < 
CO i-i i-i i-i i-i 00 CM ' 



CM 00 CM lO CO to OS^hlOCCtP HNf (ON ^NOMH h(Oh 

00 LO t~t>050SO5 CM 05 O CO CM CO CM CO CO t- i-H TP LO CO CO IOhh 
LO t> i-l O t-i LO CO CM CM t~ CM LO CM r-i 00 i-H —I ^ i-H rH OCOCM 



co HNHt-H cceotcoios 

H H(fiNOSl Ot-irnMN 
tO COCMCMi-i—' COtPCMCMOO 



CMC*-TPt-00 OCOCOLOOO 

tp lo cm cm oc as io oo co 

CO TP 00 i-i CM to TP CM CM CO 



ht-OTfCl NO>rt<00 CO O 00 
CO CO CO CO CO CfOi^W ONO 

nlONHO CO f-H f-H i-H 1— < CM CO CM 



toeoTPTPto Hiomifo 
osc-colo—i woof o>o 

CM I- CO i-< CO itrtiHHM 



COtPCOtPCM OCCMtPCMCM TP CO TP LO 00 
COOCtPlOO CMOOC-i-HCM f OOWjc 
COLOO<-tCM t-~«*CM00 00 TPt~TP «-HCO 



CM 00 TP 00 —< 
tP CO 00—110 
t- — I — < CM CM 



oo os cm — i — i 10 tp cm to lo lo 05 eo os © eo lo — i co as to 

Nf^NO CO to TP lO LO lO © OS CO OOOOtt lO 00 00 

i-H t> U0 CO CM_ WMN^.N t~- lO^tO^O lO^ tO^OC 05 00 O CM_CC^i-h 

t>COt- —I CONHMf HCQH — I CM — i <OHH 



lo — 1 05 — i co tp lo oc t- 1> os 10 to to os 
tvocMLoeo to OS o lo co to ai to cm 

CMOCCO— 'CM r-LOOOCOOS fOiPJHO 



CM CO O CO CM 
OOOiOHM 
— I — I CM CM CM 



•H OS TP CO CO 
CM CO to LO O 
C0O00HM 



co oc to o co 

OS LO CM lO 00 

oc to co eo os 



OStPtPCMCM 

^ co os co 



t-WifOM LOLOCM 
LO CM CM CM CM CO LO CM 



rH CO CO 



t> O CM CO LO 

— < oo oo co fc* 

CM Oi to r- i CM 



f MOi 1 W 

co to as co co 
to cm co ai 



to CO 00 LO CO 
CM CO OC O 05 
TP O CO CM LO 



tof octot eo cm cm 

ICONHTfc CMOSC- 
LO CM CM CM CM CO LO CM 



O CM i-l © t> 

TP Tp CM t> t~ 

CM 00 tO ~4 CM 



CO to O CM O 

t- to co eo O) 



or- cm —i05 

CM CM 05 O LO 
©00 CM t- 



OS TP CM TP CO COLO05 

TP CM OS —i CO CM CM LO 
LO IN CM CM CM 00 LO CM 



>eo— ice o^HoceocM 
1 to cm 05 <-( eo lo tp 
lo— <eo oc co co eo — < 



NKOCCH 
MTfrtOw 

rp eo tp cm lo 



CO CO OS OS t- tO 05 

t>eoocoTP cm to en 

TP CM TP CM CM tOLOCM 



CO 00 to CM 05 
TP CM 00 00 00 
t> COLO —100 



LOOSCM— <00 
LO -I CO CM CM 
05 05 CO TP CM 



oo t- coco t- 
WHOf o) 

TP LO LO CM O 



TP ^ TP CO to otooo 

05 CO © —I 05 (MOW 
CM CM TP C0 CM 00 CO 



O t> to 05 
— I —I CO TP 
LO l-H 



CM O CM LO CM C CM t- to t- O5TPCOO05 LO — I 0C LO tp t- O 

ONtowN cm tp eo eo tp co t~ — ( t> — i eo eo tp as cm cm tp 

tp 0)003 t> °* ^ ^^.^ t- O^tP CM CM t^W COtP tP noi^ 

CO CM « rH TP TP — I CM CO CMt^CM^OO 00 — ihhh 05 00 — i 



O J H 
Z < H 
"* £ X 



cm lo 05 tp co eo 

—I LO tO LO 05 



LO CO 05 CM CM 
O CO CO 0S OS 

CO CO l-H LO TP 



TP CO —I 0. 05 

otp oo o o 

LOCO O O CO 



00 CO OS CM 00 

o cm eo tp to 

tp CM t> CO LO 



LOCO CO 
t- —I CM 

loco as 



co to ec co o tp o tp cm < 



CO CM CM CM CM LOLOCM 



>ii- n • tU 
S B it A m 

<«jcquo 



a> o 



8 g> 



ee « o a; ° ts 



8 is II 



UUUQEh OWffiWS (XCotwE-' 



J3 S tJ 

r/1 O fc« 

o 



u 

OJOO^' 
«- CM 00 < 



E 

03 00 05 

-^toto 



boo 05 
Ceo to 



s 

3 s 



•^3 a I 
>»c to ^ « ic 

^CM^ OJ^t- 

-S 23 ?! "_ . 



BBS 

S « 2; 
H 33-5t)3 
W c 0«S to o 

3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



TT 



O 

>. 

00 

© 2 

S 



CM — — 



CO © '* (-CM"*-© ©-"tint© ■OlOMM X-fXt-© 

© >-i t« rtl-r^N'V CO CO CM X © N<C1CN OiCWOKO 

t» *- O CM OJ — -CO 

« H N 



© oo x © cm © eo eo eo m 

© © CM .-h OC © © ■'J'eOt-CM© 

OC CM CO CM hh 

CM CM 



© eo t> cm ■<* cm o *ot-<*o> ■ © — t- x tc t~ uc w « 

fc» t~- © CM X CM X U« Tf X CO © -HOiWX Ct-XMO> 

c i rH .°. ooco — •«-< — © — 

© CO CO 



o eo t- x © — © © a>no<ccg -aif i«o Ntaauc 
o © eo cm — © co eo © © -«r © ■ — © x © © © © © — 

— ©■**> 1f<f CM — • — CM © — — — 



© t~ cs cc co oc »h «* -onaufi 
© co © — eo © x eo ©©©cmx 
i-< eo oo i-i -o" co — — © © co 



t-«ot- cm © eo © -i* 
— © cm x c~ cm © cm eo 
•©eoeox — eoeo©-<r 



CM t— CO O 

i—i as oc eo 

■iH CM 



os © — Lames oceocstx 
eo co co o oc cs ^fTf colci 
X ^l^<iH cm — 



oo — © © 
■ooxw 

— — CM 



• co as 
■ — © oeo 

•rl CM 



CO CM LO 

— XX© 

— CM 



— cc as co cm 

f t-NOM 
© — CM — 



oo ©-cm-* — ©x©eo' 

OS CMt- — — © -*-<S<C'-©< 
O IC^TCM CM — i 



Tfino — eo 
cm oo — — eo 

CO — CM — 



© c o 
eo © © 

CM — 



t- © CM © < 

Tf©eoo< 

CO CM ' 



■ eo t> © © 
• © — ©© 



00 OS — CM CM 
OCOiO-^CM 
t- — — CM — 



© — © 
COCO- 
CM CM 



WO 



eo © oc OS 
© t~ © — © 

CM CM © © © 



x cm © © — m © t> tj< © © © 
Tfosasuo cm cm © eo © t> co x 

t>©Tj<K ©©t>CMt- — cm © 



O J H 
Z < K 
«< H O 

OHO 



© CM t> © © CO Tf UO — CO o 

m x x cm © © m©t>Ti<oo 
— cMt>xmx m © © 



• © © © eo co— ©©x © © 
■ © x — ■<*« ©mx©x cm m t— 
oj © x o t> x — x — cox© 




8 

c©© >> 
as ' _,a5 Si. 



Cy TJ 



■8 |b £ 
« cE » 

en — O u 

a ^ I! 

« g « t.S 
3-* 



a 

o g <g a o g. 

— ji^cM a> a<£ 

co^* Cj m i- 03 _ 



C© 
- « _ 
w „ g « O CJ g 
"g r CO S *0 



78 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CO -TfOlO) 



O -IN CO •-< • 



co t~ © co 

"1" <£> ri t> -<f 



OlOONi 



•ococoto oiOTf^co 



■ Ol t- 

■Tf O 



C- tD Tf OS <c 

CO 



■MXOOw CO t- CO ^- 

H H N Lg CO -J 1 © 



= 2 a 

c 



c c 
c — 



~. © U0 0C CO tD^O^H KONLlt- © © co co © 

CO -"J"^ CO CO ^ © 00 t~ CO CO ttu-CCOC— lO ~ © t}< © coco 

© OOlCC- l-t »H *~H TT t-H 1-C 



CO CO CO Ci CO 



© CO'* occc 



CO t> L.0 C~ HL'J^t-t- 

CO-tfOOOO© COCO 1 "*'-'© 



co t- m t- oc co © uo co 

C0C0—it>rH CO CO t> 



occo 



c- 1 e 



© t> — i © © 
co 40 oc ^ 



© oc co >- i 

© »-c © uO i 



III 

z r-3 



C C B 

sccssaa « o .c o u « * o © « I3j5« 
«E r JO OUOPfe CESLsJg a. Cm k 



o o a 



* c 5 



•382 

£££ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



TABLE 22 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: 
Maryland County Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 


White Schools 




Colored 


Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


1,016 


517 


5.9 


3.3 


306 


182 


12.5 


7.7 


Allegany 


79 


35 


9.1 


4.2 


2 


2 


18.2 


12.5 




141 


75 


9.5 


5.6 


53 


25 


15.5 


8.1 


Baltimore 


202 


107 


5.8 


3.4 


12 


4 


4.8 


1.7 


Calvert 


10 


2 


10.2 


2.5 


8 


8 


8.7 


6.6 


Caroline 


20 


9 


11.4 


5.8 


6 


11 


13.0 


19.0 


Carroll 


22 


7 


4.4 


1.6 


1 




5.3 




Cecil 


59 


32 


12.8 


7.1 


5 


' 4 


17.9 


12.1 


Charles 


11 


6 


5.5 


3.4 


34 


17 


19.1 


11.0 




14 


8 


6.5 


3.9 


7 


3 


6.5 


2.8 




20 


3 


3.0 


0.5 


2 


1 


2.9 


1.6 


Garrett 


13 


12 


5.5 


4.7 












54 


32 


7.3 


4.2 




' i 




i'.3 




15 


5 


5.3 


2.1 


' "l 


4 


13.2 


6.5 


Kent 


17 


12 


13.9 


9.4 


7 


1 


14.3 


1.9 


Montgomery 


120 


70 


4.5 


2.8 


37 


19 


21.6 


10.4 


Prince George's 


105 


58 


3.8 


2.3 


62 


42 


15.1 


10.6 


Queen Anne's 


7 


1 


5.1 


0.7 










St. Mary's 


16 


10 


8.0 


5.3 


*ii 


' "l 


12.9 


10.6 


Somerset 


23 


10 


14.6 


6.3 


9 


8 


8.9 


9.7 


Talbot 


10 


8 


6.4 


5.8 


17 


14 


26.1 


23.7 


Washington 


16 


5 


1.7 


0.6 












36 


9 


9.6 


2.8 


23 


* 9 


19.8 


7*7 




6 


1 


3.3 


0.6 


8 


2 


2.7 


2.0 



* Excludes pupils !n first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



80 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 23 — Graduates of Maryland County High Schools— 1945-54 : by County 
and Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Year and 
County 


Grand 
Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 



BY YEAR, 1945-54 



1944-45 


7,286 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


755 


279 


476 


1945-46 


7,549 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 


1946-47 


8,380 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


937 


357 


580 


1947-48 


8,548 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


1948-49 


6,971 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


1949-50 


4,800 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


415 


187 


228 


1950-51 


8,288 


7,382 


3,391 


3,991 


906 


400 


506 


1951-52 


8,878 


7,968 


3,725 


4,243 


910 


409 


501 


1952-53 


9,695 


8,609 


4,084 


4,525 


1,086 


491 


595 


1953-54 


10,303 


9,258 


4,404 


4,854 


1,045 


487 


558 


BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1958-54 


Total State 


14,070 


12,110 


5,842 


6,268 


1,960 


828 


1,132 


Baltimore City 


3,767 


2,852 


1,438 


1,414 


915 


341 


574 


Total Counties 


10,303 


9,258 


4,404 


4,854 


1,045 


487 


558 


Allegany 


882 


866 


455 


411 


16 


8 


8 


Anne Arundel .... 


718 


578 


257 


321 


140 


59 


81 


Baltimore 


1,636 


1,542 


673 


869 


94 


44 


50 


Calvert 


92 


64 


37 


27 


28 


14 


14 




156 


130 


76 


54 


26 


12 


14 


Carroll 


377 


361 


165 


196 


16 


9 


7 


Cecil 


260 


249 


124 


125 


11 


5 


6 


Charles 


196 


123 


57 


66 


73 


28 


45 


Dorchester 


242 


181 


89 


92 


61 


36 


25 


Frederick 


466 


424 


198 


226 


42 


19 


23 


Garrett 


170 


170 


76 


94 








Harford 


427 


374 


174 


200 


53 


31 


22 


Howard 


202 


167 


85 


82 


35 


12 


23 


Kent 


111 


88 


50 


38 


23 


13 


10 


Montgomery* .... 


1,237 


1,165 


566 


599 


72 


33 


39 


Prince George'sf . . 


1,506 


1,383 


658 


725 


123 


56 


67 


Queen Anne's 


128 


106 


47 


59 


22 


5 


17 


St. Mary's 


106 


88 


38 


50 


18 


8 


10 


Somerset 


154 


93 


58 


35 


61 


31 


30 


Talbot 


168 


140 


59 


81 


28 


19 


9 


Washington 


624 


612 


300 


312 


12 


3 


9 


Wicomico 


276 


219 


103 


116 


57 


27 


30 


Worcester 


169 


135 


59 


76 


34 


15 


19 



* Includes 16 boys, 3 girls, graduates of 1954 summer school, 
t Includes 14 boys, 8 girls, graduates of 1954 summer school. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



TABLE 24— Number and Per Cent of High School Graduates Who Entered State 
Teachers Colleges Fall After Graduation: Counties of Maryland— 1945-1950: 
State of Maryland— 1951-1954 





High School Graduates 


Entrants to State Teachers 


Colleges 


Year 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girla 



TOTAL GRADUATES 



1944-45 


7,286 


2,824 


4,462 


28 


155 


1.0 


3.5 


1945-46 


7,549 


2,909 


4,640 


61 


179 


2.1 


3.9 


1946-47 


8,380 


3,601 


4,779 


132 


187 


3.7 


3.9 


1947-48 


8,548 


3,808 


4,740 


113 


277 


3.0 


5.8 


1948-49 


6,971 


3,142 


3,829 


160 


315 


5.1 


8.2 


1949-50 


4,800 


2,335 


2,465 


56 


136 


2.4 


5.5 


1950-51* 


12,101 


5,596 


6,505 


110 


315 


2.0 


4.8 


1951-52 


12,352 


5,741 


6,611 


166 


361 


2.9 


5.5 


1952-53 


13,356 


6,266 


7,100 


140 


455 


4.5 


6.4 


1953-54 


14,070 


6,670 


7,400 


163 


446 


2.4 


6.0 



WHITE GRADUATES 



1944-45 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


23 


118 


0.9 


3.0 


1945-46 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


53 


151 


2.0 


3.6 


1946-47 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


121 


148 


3.7 


3.5 


1947-48 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


105 


245 


3.1 


5.8 


1948-49 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


141 


249 


5.0 


7.3 


1949-50 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


51 


113 


2.4 


5.1 


1950-51* 


10.378 


4,905 


5,473 


92 


198 


1.9 


3.6 


1951-52 


10 678 


5,059 


5,619 


141 


219 


2.8 


3.9 


1952-53 


11,444 


5,452 


5,992 


120 


293 


2.2 


4.9 


1963-54 


12,110 


5,842 


6,268 


152 


320 


2.6 


5.1 



COLORED GRADUATES 



1944-45 


755 


279 


476 


5 


37 


1.8 


7.8 


1945-46 


740 


268 


472 


8 


28 


3.0 


5.9 


1946-47 


937 


357 


580 


11 


39 


3.1 


6.7 


1947-48 


889 


391 


498 


8 


32 


2.0 


6.4 


1948-49 


780 


342 


438 


19 


66 


5.5 


15.1 


1949-50 


415 


187 


228 


5 


23 


2.7 


10.1 


1950-51* 


1,723 


691 


1,032 


18 


117 


2.6 


11.3 


1951-52 


1,674 


682 


992 


25 


142 


3.7 


14.3 


1952-53 


1,912 


804 


1,108 


20 


162 


2.5 


14.6 


1953-54 


1,960 


828 


1,132 


11 


126 


1.3 


11.1 



Increase due to inclusion of Baltimore City graduates and entrants to Coppin State Teachers College. 



82 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 25 — Comparison of Number and Per Cent of Maryland County High School 
Graduates Continuing Education or Staying or Working at Home Year Following 

Graduation: 1944-1953 









Number 


Per Cent 


Year of 
Graduation 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or Work- 
ing at Home, 
Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or Work- 
ing at Home, 
Married 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 



TOTAL GRADUATES 



1944 


2,764 


4,504 


391 


1,322 


13 


500 


14.1 


29.3 





5 


11.1 


1945 


2,824 


4,462 


518 


1,415 


21 


646 


18.3 


31.7 





7 


14.5 


1946 


2,909 


4,640 


661 


1,377 


45 


511 


22.7 


29.7 


1 


5 


11.0 


1947 


3,612 


4,785 


968 


1,434 


91 


893 


26.8 


30.0 


2 


5 


18.7 


1948 


3,810 


4,740 


947 


1,444 


81 


362 


24.9 


30.5 


2 


1 


7.6 


1949 


3,142 


3,829 


861 


1,282 


90 


706 


27.4 


33.5 


2 


9 


18.4 


1950 


2,335 


2,465 


706 


833 


42 


388 


30.2 


33.8 


1 


8 


15.7 


1951 


3,791 


4,497 


1,034 


1,389 


96 


719 


27.3 


30.9 


2 


6 


16.0 


1952 


4,134 


4,744 


1,235 


1,419 


57 


740 


29.9 


29.9 


1 


4 


15.6 


1953 


4,575 


5,120 


1,353 


1,641 


135 


911 


29.6 


32.1 


2 


9 


17.8 



WHITE GRADUATES 



1944 


2,493 


4,057 


338 


1,177 


12 


448 


13 


5 


29.0 





5 


11 





1945 


2,545 


3,986 


434 


1,232 


19 


587 


17 


1 


30.9 





7 


14 


7 


1946 


2,641 


4,168 


601 


1,218 


36 


420 


22 


7 


29.2 


1 


4 


10 


1 


1947 


3,255 


4,205 


901 


1,268 


77 


769 


27 


7 


30.1 


2 


4 


18 


3 


1948 


3,419 


4,242 


865 


1,282 


68 


277 


25 


3 


30.2 


2 





6 


5 


1949 


2,800 


3,391 


787 


1,143 


78 


654 


28 


1 


33.7 


2 


8 


19 


3 


1950 


2,148 


2,237 


655 


761 


42 


328 


30 


5 


34.0 


1 


9 


14 


7 


1951 


3,391 


3,991 


935 


1,186 


69 


587 


27 


6 


29.7 


2 





14 


7 


1952 


3,725 


4,243 


1,110 


1,223 


37 


655 


29 


8 


28.8 


1 





15 


4 


1953 


4,084 


4,525 


1,221 


1,423 


100 


759 


29 


9 


31.4 


2 


4 


16 


8 



COLORED GRADUATES 



1944 


271 


447 


53 


145 


1 


52 


19.5 


32 


4 


0.4 


11.6 


1945 


279 


476 


84 


183 


2 


59 


30.1 


38 


4 


0.7 


12.4 


1946 


268 


472 


60 


159 


9 


91 


22.4 


33 


7 


3.3 


19.3 


1947 


357 


580 


67 


166 


14 


124 


18.8 


28 


6 


3.9 


21.4 


1948 


391 


498 


82 


162 


13 


85 


21.0 


32 


5 


3.3 


17.1 


1949 


342 


438 


74 


139 


12 


52 


21.6 


31 


7 


3.5 


11.9 


1950 


187 


228 


51 


72 




60 


27.3 


31 


6 




26.3 


1951 


400 


506 


99 


203 


27 


132 


24.7 


40 


1 


6.7 


26.1 


1952 


409 


501 


125 


196 


20 


85 


30.6 


39 


1 


4.9 


17.0 


1953 


491 


595 


132 


218 


35 


152 


26.9 


36 


6 


7.1 


25.5 



Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



UMOU>{Ufl 

puB snoauEjiaosij^ 



BJ3>{JOA\. 
90IAJ3S JoqiQ 



sjojoqBq 

PUB B3Al4BJ8dO 

-SuurqoBjnuBiuuofvi 
puB SuurrpBjnuBj^ 



S9AlJBJ3dO 



uaius^jBj^ 



mco 



Ci OC HOM •< 
CM ■ COIN ■ 

—i CM 



cocm 
10 ct> 



OtJ< cjmonh -CM.-HCMCM Nt> • -CT> CO -»H^ ®<Oi 



CO lO CO CO 



•iN.-i.-iCT> t-'CHf M 



lOCM CM COlO CCCOCTS.-ICM >-i •< 



LO t> OC CM CM < 



HHI- CM CM I 



CM t- CO CM CM 



t-ii-i oc lo oo 
m ■ « f 

CM CO 



LO f- rj< CM 1" CO ' 



COCTjlOCOCTJ t>LOCMCOCT> OC i-H 



CO CO CM ( 



rHlO O C- 



8J9jjjo^\ pajpurjj 
puB 'sajBS '\voud\o 



iH O 

coco 



O CO CCiOHNSS 

oo • ccwohh 

CTiCO .-".-it* 



C00CCMOCM Nl-HXO CM CD CD CO O t~ t - — ' 
t-COCMT*CC CO CTl •<* t» TfMfJHCC COCMCM 

i-> co 



Suuaquinq jo 
'Suiqsij 'ajrmnouSy 



CM CM ■ CM .-H 



co lo co .-ioo 



pus IBUOISS8JOJJ 



- 



i>3 CM CM LO 



BJ8>JJO^\ 



aoiAjag 
JBAB]^ J0 ^ JB: W!I^ 



—i-* CO 



(N CM • —I 



00 LO 
CO ■ 
CD LO 



8UIOH W 

Suijjjo^. jo SuiA"b;s 



CDtJ< 

o • 

CM CO 



CM OC 
t> • 
r-tCO 



CT5COO0 -LO CMCOCM^CO N^^rn> CO CO CM CO CO rH CO . 



t> LOC0>-iCM>-i 00 Tj* CM 



paujBjv 



3uisjn^j 



CTi UO 
CM LO 



COCMC000CO t-t- -i-HLO OC 



siooqos qSiH 

0}BnpBJ£) 

-•jsoj puB "dajj a3aij03 



Hi 



siooqos SuiuaAg pus 

IBIOJOUIUIOQ 'jBUOpBDO^ 



i-noco -cm 



in 

oo ■ 

(NTT 



OCMCMC0t> IOCMlOlOlO t> CO • OC CO t-CM 



CO CM CM CO C- 



0Ct> O CM CO -co coco • -CD .-tCOCMCMOO LO 



sjooqos 
'oisnj^ jo 'buibjq ':}jy 



Suiuibjj, jaqoBaj, jo 
aSa'lloo sjoqoBaj, 8}B?g 



CM CO CO t> 00 . 
f • M lO 
CM LO 



oicocoxco 



■ LO T»H 



OCM CMCO-tfcOLO 



A^isjaAiuj} jo 92ono3 



CM CM 

co • 

COCTJ 



CO lO CTi CO t> t-^iOLOCT> 



BeiBnpBjQ 
jo jaquin^ ib^oj, 



OCTJOCT5- 
CO 00 t- CM < 
■<J< CM t> 



CT> t> —i 00 CD 
OC CO CD occo 
i-Hi-t CM 



ocoot-mcM 

00 CM LO CM t> 
CO CM CD 



OOC-tfCM"* 
CT5 t> CD CO CO 
rH lO 



9 



= £ 7. 
3 3 q5 



c _ 



5 g 



eaa>j=o2 cartoajo 'cs^nfl ^ 
UUOQfc OEBWS a*0>£wH £££ 



84 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



as o 2 

sis 



Xjo^BAjasuoj 
Xpoqsaj 



K) N B 



3!I n f »TOA 



AJBUlUiag 

s,aj'bjv ">S 



Xjauioa^uoj^ 



aJouirjjBg 



S3 m 



uosmox 



AmqBn«S 



aojaui 11103 



Ol CO —< CM O 



ec n • «-« 



CM Cft CO 



CO CD 



C- .-< -N W 



CO to t- CM >-l CM 



— 'CMr-<CM< 



PUB|XJBI^ JO A^ISJaAlUft 



ajorapiBg ;o X;isjaAiufi 



CO CD U5t-CO CM CO lO t> • 

CO to <-• CM UO 

U5 »-c "T 



t- OS CO 



ICMOCOCM HPJIOH* T}<t-< 



tO H f 



satJidOH suqof 



r-ti-tNi-ICO 



poo H 



jaqonof) 



aoiBQ aj;o^ jo a3aijo3 



sa3ajio3 
puB]XjBpv 3uua}ug 
sa^BnpBJO jbjoj, 



CO CM tO 



t~- O t- Tf CT) CM CO O «£> 00 Ci CO CM to lO lO CM .-HOCCtOO O ^ ' 
CO CM CD CO T i-l v-t CM CM "H 00 CO <-i CO CM ' 

CM IC t- .-I r-t iH 



5 

■ I 

5 2 



M o 

a; c _ 

C 



o c to 



<<CQUO UUUQfc OKEWS CUCcowH 



£8* 

III 

£££ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



J.I JS,I.U( i \\ 


O 1 N 


















































• rH 






















« 1 










































































OOllUOOlM 
» ww 






























■ CO 
























*r 








•eo 














PQ j °° 


















































• OJ 


























uoj,3uju,sb^ 


O 1 10 






















































• co 1-1 










• CM CM 












CQ 1 "5 
^ 1 CM 




















CM 
























CM iH 






■ t- 












t~ co 












loqjBj, 


O 1 


























































• CM 


























PQ 1 n 
























































































O 1 N 


























































































CQ | « 








CM 


















































































s^jbj^ 


O | -< 




























































































PQ | « 
























































































6 ( auuv aaeriQ 
























































































CQ | 
























































































8,33J090 bouijj 


O 1 £ 










N 






r-l CM 








CM »H 
















CM 








01 CM 


—1 CO 














» 1 co 1 






















CM -iH 












CM CO 














eo 














Xjeuio3}uoj^ 


_ 1 °o 

O CM 




Tf eo eo 


CM 






CO eo m 










co o> 


CO iH rt OC CM rH CM 




CM 






CQ 




■«* 


t> 


■00 


CM 


rHCM— 1 








CO —1 


eo i-i 






eot--iCft 






hNWKHKh 














C | -* 


















































































CQ | h 


























































































pJBMOJJ^ 


O 1 N 
























































































CQ | n 


























































































DJOIJRU 


O 1 










CM 


















CO 




























CO 
























CQ | * 










CO 






CO 


















































CM 
















O | 




















































































CQ | « 










































































• IO 














O 1 w 










OJ 








































CO 










rr 






1-H 






CQ 


















































i-H CM 


rH 




It 


























J9^B9tJ0JOQ 


O 


























































































CQ 


co 






































































C0 
















O 


























































































n 


eo 



























































































CM 










eo 


















































eo 




N 






TJ" 














CQ 


t- 










eo 


















































CM 
























JJ0JJB3 


O 


CO 


























































CM 












CI 














CQ 


■«* 


















































































9UIJ0JB3 


O 






















































































CQ 












CM • 


















































CM 




























5J8AIBQ 


O 




























































































CQ 


OJ 






























































CM 






























O 


t- 
lO 
















































CM • 


in 


CO 




eo 

OJ 






iH 












CQ 


iO 

co 








eo • 








coco-h 


CM 




CM ■ 










m ■ • 




CO 




CO 


CO-HrH 




IO CM 














O 













































•CM • 












CM 




CM • 












CQ 


cm 1-1 • 

CM 
























CI 




















in 


eo 


1—1 • 




CO ■ 












Xub38]|v 


O 


CO • • 
















CM • 




























eo 




















CQ 


lO • • 

eo ■ • 










0) ■ 
























• • • CM 






CO 






1-1 CO OS 












sapunoo I*3<\L 





t- i-i<-tr- 1 -<r cm as 01 • 

n< eo 

co 


eot-eOTHi-i • 


rj" in co H 1-1 —1 —i ■ 


CO • Ol CM • 

• CM ■ 


t>CMrHineOCMOCCCOrH-H<C5 
CM t> <— ' CO 




B 


oc 1-1 • 

ITi 

eo 




eo — 1 • 


CMco^eoeo ■ 


BHHN0CHO1H • 

CM CM — ' 


t> 
t- 


1-1 10 co eo cm t- • 

i-H CO CO • 












ajouipiBg 




Tj< ■ • 

<Ji ■ ■ 






•CM-hco • • 














•tH 'CMOS ■ 


IO • 




eo 


CO rH . 




eo »-i 










» 


in *-h • 

CM 






i-i -CM 1 * IO • 








ccco~«th • 




co m 00 ■ 


10 • 


rHco • 


CM • • 




o> CO ■ 














,_( ,_i_, H „* C v|_,cOt>-'1< ■ 

-* r-ieo 


■■I'oceo-HCM • 


CM t- i-H ^ iH -Tf -^--h ■ 

CM - CM CO • 


NNTHtCnia-(Dt-HrfNH rH CM rH rH 

eo i-i OrH 





eo in • 
00 


10 £^ ^ 2 ^ ^ ^* nw * ' 


occcoj-'i'eo • 


o>tOHO«r-iTiirtHO • eo m co cm co eo • 
eo eo cm cm • 1- re co • 










g 




cs 




.3 = 


ticut . . 
re 


)lumbia 














>> ca '. 


05 

1 : 

is 


rt'H. • 




ipshire 

rsey . . . 
exico. . 

>rk 

"arolina 
Dakota 


p : 


vania . 

/arolina 
tee. . . . 










'c ; 
"S c 


untry: 


>l 




es 

5 



C^J o 

C <D 

uoc 



■CMC 

III 



O eS 

=: c 



— D . S «J «i C O p v ? 



)4J c ~ 



O 



86 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



UM.ouy\u[\ 
pus ssnoatn?[iODSip\[ 



aoiAjag jaq^Q 



co o> ■ co c-i 

CO 



00C- ■ ■«* CO • • rHCM • 

co 



100 lO-vrcn 01 ■ t» 



sjaaoqBq 
pan sjo^Baado — 3in 

-JtVpBjnUBUlUOf^ 

pus 3uun;oBjnuBjv 



CO -J)" m O) iO 



eaApBaado 



oos oo 



CJ co 
o 



00 (N «£> 
CO 



uacusijBJO 



ICO <N- 



sjajjjo^ P9JP"!H 
puB 'sajBg 'jBJua'u 



CM N t- 



co o> 

W 



3uuaqtun i jo 



lO LC m CM kO -CMf 



sjojatjdojj 
pus p3uojs'sajojj 



oo t~ 
o 



O 



aoiAjag 
jbabjs[ jo Xjb;iiij>i 



■«*eo cn co oc co • oj cr> o < 

CO r- 1 »— < 

CM 



•CM-** V>t~Oi 



atuojj ^B 
3atJ{jOA\. JO Suiabis 



oc o 
oo • 

1"H t> 



-CM CMC0 CM 



paujBj^ 



•tTCMCMCM MHrirtIN <M 



3uisjnjs[ 



0C <£> 00 



"S H 

a^BnpBjQ-^soj 
pnB 'dajj aSajjc^ 



o 



t- CI SO 

o 



spoqos 

JBUOl^BOO^ JO 
IBlOJatUUIOQ 'OpBJJL 



0C«D HH -H 



3UIUIBJJ, 

jaqoBaj, jo a3aj[03 
BjaqDBaj, a^B^s 



' -h -en m cm »h 



• cocoiCr-i t>»-icot~co 



'CO • IN i 
CO 



-CO • (M ' 



A'llSjaAJUfl 

jo a3aiio3 



0C t- 

i-i • eg 



iflONN .-h CM iO CO CO 



sa^BnpBJQ 
jo jaqtun^ ibjoj, 



«ceo ct> 

CO • CM 

cm o> »h 



•<OC0C0t> NHHt-<0 Nt-N 



U0 • OrHCMSOO ■«* CM CO i 
O ■ lOt-HH ,_( , 



rt 3 0) 



::> ti cO 



M 0> — 



0) 

> 8 

rt rt 

CO 



03 C 



»- o * i; S 
rt nix o £ 



oj o rt 
rt rt o a>o 



£so 

M ? U 

£££ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 





















































°!HO | cq j ~ *" 


















































ajjUSdUIBfJ M9f^ I CQ 1 *"* 


















































unSiqoij^ 1 O 1 ^ • 
































































































mreipa] 1 co 1 


















































tspuojj | o | ~ M 


















































1 o 1 "* 


















































1 09 1 ~ "* ^ 














































1 O ~ ~ 
KuijOjUQ qinog 1 1 


















































CQ | ~" 






































































































CM 




CN 












































CM 














































BuiBq^iv 1 ml ^ ~ ~ 




























































































| CQ | N ~ *" 




























































































1 CQ j ^ -" M 












































j ^ 1 ir> co cm 










































BtnjoaFf) ijjjo^ | i o to 
CQ | 








































| o\ a - - 
























i-H CO 












tJiqninioQ jo ;ou}siq ■ , m w o 
CQ | cm — — 




























to 




CM i— 








| o | 2 10 2 
























CM 




— CO 




Eini3.il A i i <m o> co 


Tti CO • 


















CO 









SaSSaflOQ 



:i c f hn* 



— CM OS 



s.uuof ">S | O | ^ ^ 


















































pusjXjBp^ jo XjisaaAiufi 1 CQ 1 ""• 


















































I ^ I K (M <M 

sui5jdojj sui\o[ CQ 












































1 °| °° 


OO 




























00 
















aSajIOQ joinnf jsajeq , . ^ 
CQ •-" 








































CN 




1 0| 2 


CO 
















— CO CO 








CM — 


auuy KSdJuuj , i us »o o 
CQ co co 


N 














CM « • tO • 




lO —CO — 


1 „ I O CO Tj» 

O to «© 


CO 










































mddoQ | „, 

125 1 : 














































I „ 1 CO (M 








CO CO >c 


to —i co r— co 


O 




1 « 


00 oo 


CM • • • 










CO • 




N 






O 


U5 TT — « 

•o o »o 


CO CO rH ' — « CM CM CM 


CO CM 


CM CM — « 


CM -h vH 


CO 




- 


OO o OO 
OO CO 


tOUSCNcM • — COCM — 


CO -CM— CO • »— CM — 


CM 



'COCOtO to -h ri CM tO CM 00 CO 



aSanoQ Smjajoa 


o 


CM K OO 

co oo ^- 

CO — — 


fu0«9>CO HMOW* 
— CM — 


tOt^tCCO NOWCS ■ CO 




- 


to CO CO 
lO CO CM 
CM — — 


tO — CM t— 


— to co — 


eccocot-- lo — — os cn os co 



g £ 



™ 1 2 

E- CQ H 



5jd 

05 O 

as "g 



a c i« gj 4 «« a>js o £ 
<<JCQOO OOOQfc. 



eg o a ■ 
ttS eg 
<« e« O o o 

oxtsws 



C C oj 

11=11 



lis 
Hi 

S.H o 



88 



8 



1! 



If 



35 



ii 



li 



4 



* 8 

2 



Eighty- 



Eighth Annual 

SSSgg gE_2S| 



Report 



2 



=3s Si _ ip|§ pp| ps 



I B sjiSsi pSis sssll ISlls lil 



| s ||pi pill ipsjj pill pi 
i * ipi |g§§| g§g§i isisi pi 



i 



g.ipg isiss siais sssu lis 



I * iipl 



nsss aai«c gasaa em 



§ S gSgSS S^SS gSSSS g 55 



g - § : « : 8 : : :3 8 : :8g §S 



I ■ Sal 



mm 



mm 



mm 



mrnrnm 

-r Oi 



5 Sfepl 



1 - sir= 



slslf 



sgsss |£3 



8 « 



t 



liiif 



ifsii" 



E.3EIG SJI 

mm in 



iMiFipirmit 



k sipi mm mm% 



mm m 
mm m 



|sias pi 

ism isi 



£=88* 1-1 




* §8.1*1 

FTP 



ipif 



••lis 




i - ia?» a 



1 1 1 



J ! 



if 



ill 

I 



»-8S= s | 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



XCOOSCM-'J'rHCOiOeOt^ 
t- CC — I — rH WHrt 



■asoomrHost^cMcoxt^t-co 

(NHHNt-HNMH i-( C\l 



mtOrHcoasojcgo: co 
ioincoxt-asc~cot-as 

lO H H CM rH rH 



oiMOicoM^nmiocofirH 
NH HHt-H«MH cm cm 



8-1 



inrHrHt>COrHt>COinTl« 

HonanoooiHtca 

00 t~ rH rH rH -"J 1 CM rH 



iflWNioaiNHOtcn 

HO<CHt-010«i0 51 

t~[-CMrH HMNH 



NHHWOHHNN CC CM 



01HO)Mt~HHX1'Mt-10 
NWHCOCJHHMW COIN 



Busii 
Educa 


pq 


i co irt -"f ocooioi runeo -ootc eo-<* -co •© co rH 

[s. . — - - ] ~ j ( *_< . jrj £13 rrj . . . « 

CO 


Home 
Economics 


Voc. 


c 


<y> o rH ■ <-i CM CO X **< OS CO • • -KNTfCOt- •© ■ 

CM rH CJ ■ CM lO t>" CM CC C*- lO T^ 1 - LO £q £Q . £q . . ^( 


o 
C 

q> 
O 


o 


1 O CO ©OJX-^COmcOrHOSC- • T* CM t- CO CO tJ" CM in CM C- CM t- 

co co r\j rH t~— co m co co co os • cm ^ct* o oo oo o os co co c— © rH 

lO t-rfrH HH NHHN(Ort NH CCN 


Industrial 


Edu. 


PQ 


CM CM JO CM — ^ | 


Arts 


m 


CO C- (ONNt-HCgmTft-f ■ 00 -«3< ■O" mrH t- CC CO CO OS CO 
CO CM t— Cv] Tf OS 00 O CM i n lO - t^i rH rH jvj oc O CO ^ CO o 
Cft CM m HNHH CM rH rH CM "J" rH CM rH (N CM 

CO 


Agri- 
cul- 
ture 


« 


h ■ ■ *—t cm ■ ot» • • • tt co co co m co -co cmcm 

© rH -lO ^ 


Latin, 
French, 


•O.S 


o 


t- t- ■o>ho • • • as m • • -co -lomeo • x co m 

OS • CM ^i* CM • m CM • rH • CM ^ *- **H • rH CM lO rH 
■«* rH 


c c 

d 03 

a 

CO 


PQ 


CJ5 tJ« ■ rH t> OS • • ■ Tf CM • • LO • CO OS in • lO t~ rH C\l CO 
CO • CO CM * CO d • *"H — "< * rH rH CO 
CM 


Mathe- 


;ics 





lO [- OS CM O CO © t> CS OS 00 • CO © m in CC t- CM X CC rH rH 
rH X CO CM rH rH rH CM rH rH -tm ©_rH 0J CM rH CM CM 
CO «H 


roal 


PQ 


r}< tJ< HOl-NWCOrtffiOO • i-l O O CM t- rH CO OC CJ. CO OS OS 
OS 0C t) 4 CM O OS lO O CO Oi tJ" • CO CO C^J C^- t^- O CO OC t— O CO 

l> c- r- —i hcchh cMrHi-ieboorH(NCM— i incn 


Science 




O 


0C rH T}< CO 0C CO lO rH O CO 0C CM • CO CO rH Ol O rH CO X t~ IO t- CM 

•«*< t> co co -rf o oi cc o 10 -as m co o »o co coth o co rH o 

rH CO CM rH rH TfNH rH rH rH CO lO rH rH CM CM CM CM 
lO 




PQ 


CM rH CO t> rH rH CM lO CM OS rH • C75 CO rH t~ X Tj" CM CO CO IC OS 

CM t> COXCOC0COa>O5XXt> ■0«lO(NNNmON^rfW 
CT>_ CO t> CM rH CO rH rH CMrHrHCM^CfrHrHCMCM CM rH 


Social 


03 

.22 





CO lO CO CO CO lO rH CO t*- rH rH • CO X X in CO M rH 05 CO O rH 

m in m co -<r co as o t> co co cm -oxioioxoioawn^H 

X^ BNH H HHrl H TtrHrHrH CM rH 

CO 


Stu< 


PQ 


as as cccoxxt-CMt-CMOt- •Hnx^xioocgwiocox 
m rr co co as m x as co o rH -rHomcocviasrHccinojt-x 

« l>HH rHrHrHrHrHCOrHrHrH CM 

CO 


Coref 




O 


O CO ■ (MOO rHt-CMCO COCOt> OrHOt-CMrHCMO 

m ■** • xcot- • cm co as t- -ioho ■ co c- o x co -ex m as 

CO ^ CO i-^ ^ ^ r-t i-^ ^ rH 
CO rH 




PQ 


X O • -COrHCO -lOOSt-t^ -XrHrH ■ X CO CO O CO X OJ O 

co in • -cot-as eoxxt> -co-^o •cot-asom-^incM 

lO CM rHrHrHOSCMrHCM 

CO 


Total 


ment 


O 


os co oo x o in rH c-- o as • as as m t- co tj< t- 1~ rn 
incocM-^cooasooinas iffx<OHai»OHHi>HO 

CM OSC^CMrHrH lO CM rH CM rH rH LO HH CM CO CM CO CO 
t> rH 


Enroll 


PQ 


OS COiOTf •"j'ONHNif ^ OHOSHHiHMKfjmXX 
rH - (CNM^KClCHNCl ^HiOOt»NCMMt--NC 
Cft X CM rH HTfNH CMCMrHTH O^rH CM CO CM CO CO 

CO rH 



in -O 

| s 



^ Ph 



03 ^VV 



CD O C 03 



<<pQUUUUUQfcOrCffiWSpHawc?E-'r5^^ 



&8J 



o: 



Is" 

=: c 

o _a> 



C 73 
C 
O ee 



m 

-e.2 § 

-13 

Ms 

■S « © 



W X rH kOrH.i: 

be 



© <M CC < 



_ tT3 



HO i 



aioc 
- o c ' 



(S^gcg c£ S 8 fe' 

CQrCSC-0 , CCHr5rir5| 



2-e.S'g S' 



c 

<PQ 



90 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



3 
w 

S 



L- C 



51 

6| 



!7 *- 



-Q 

0) 



O o 
C£ 3 



3 



£2 



2^ S 
©•§ « 
ja 3!= 
o — 

£_ r. c 

JO 

— ^ > 
Z 



Tf^-u^ot^coc-w ccirt— i sr. ^ t~ t> « x 



Ar4 00lOC0^e9lfl AMO --rc-)Cri« 

:)c?xi-t-xs [- x » c c l* c . o 
to c- 1- rtr»M njim^ci'- 



C3>— 'Oocr^»— ito 



«L:NOCKOt- CI 00 « 

to m r-: e ~ r: — < hoo 



rj Ti Ti r? — — 



< 

T3 O 

-CT3 
3 3 

T « 
.3 o 

el 
H 

— - o 

— p -o 



£ o « 

3— w 

g 5 = 

«. W 0i 

3 o.a 

■si s 

•r x ~ 



-7. E 



3 



! c 2 



3 O ' 

so: 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 34 

Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses: Maryland County High Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 


English 


7t 


8t 


9t 


lot 


lit 


12t 


Other* 


Grand Total 


23,076 


21,638 


19,404 


17,217 


13,381 


10,776 


3,171 





WHITE 



Total Counties 


19,745 


18,531 


16,738 


15,085 


11,885 


9,618 


3,008 




i ino 


1 Q1 1 
l,oi 1 


l,06o 


1 91 A 
1,611 






179 


Anne Arundel .... 


1 ,■>.'•> 


1 A r.r\ 




l,Vol 


BOO 




ftn 

yu 


Baltimore 


4,106 


3,878 


3,242 


2,836 


2,119 


1,597 


950 


Calvert 


147 


124 


108 


90 


78 


67 


7 


Caroline 


276 


232 


199 


215 


180 


138 




Carroll 


710 


704 


611 


528 


422 


379 


117 


Cecil 


524 


497 


417 


398 


284 


255 




Charles 


270 


256 


213 


199 


162 


127 




Dorchester 


304 


287 


236 


238 


200 


184 


i5 


Frederick 


829 


862 


831 


725 


570 


443 


61 


Garrett 


426 


295 


346 


280 


230 


172 


78 


Harford 


804 


761 


672 


550 


454 


391 


60 




398 


335 


283 


237 


185 


170 


68 


Kent 


182 


157 


136 


136 


103 


88 




Montgomery 


2,676 


2,328 


2,073 


1,950 


1,458 


1,182 


5i5 


Prince George's. . . 


2,737 


2,449 


2,321 


2,169 


1,682 


1,442 


551 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


185 


187 


151 


140 


126 


111 


25 


St. Mary's 


189 


145 


192 


152 


132 


101 




Somerset 


216 


197 


150 


137 


119 


97 




Talbot 


252 


197 


161 


172 


155 


148 




Washington 


1,307 


1,196 


1,207 


1,087 


871 


638 


146 


Wicomico 


75 


453 


361 


336 


255 


225 


146 


Worcester 


237 


230 


209 


215 


166 


138 





COLORED 



Total Counties 


3,331 


3,107 


2,666 


2,132 


1,496 


1,158 


163 


Allegany 


28 


27 


18 


18 


12 


16 




Anne Arundel .... 


426 


386 


321 


280 


200 


152 




Baltimore 


390 


337 


274 


218 


119 


99 


40 


Calvert 


130 


122 


96 


71 


30 


32 




Caroline 


80 


81 


66 


52 


32 


32 




Carroll 


38 


44 


42 


29 


19 


16 




Cecil 


54 


41 


33 


34 


20 


13 




Charles 


249 


192 


172 


136 


94 


77 


ii 


Dorchester 


42 


135 


126 


84 


78 


62 




Frederick 


51 


99 


92 


59 


35 


46 


50 


Garrett 
















Harford 


li9 


106 


87 


86 


69 


57 




Howard 


91 


89 


67 


63 


44 


36 




Kent 


88 


65 


52 


52 


38 


26 




Montgomery 


250 


193 


155 


126 


92 


86 




Prince George's . . . 


560 


511 


434 


314 


228 


143 


31 


Queen Anne's 


65 


79 


74 


58 


36 


22 




St. Mary's 


115 


87 


84 


58 


36 


23 




Somerset 


157 


121 


98 


98 


85 


72 




Talbot 


114 


92 


78 


68 


59 


28 




Washington 


34 


32 


18 


25 


20 


16 




Wicomico 


102 


136 


132 


114 


85 


60 


25 


Worcester 


148 


132 


147 


89 


65 


44 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXVII. 

t Includes 1,145 taking Journalism; 1,068 taking Public Speaking; and 958 taking Dramatics. 



92 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



>> o 



8.S 
11 



2 8-S 
ti„t. 



£t3 § 
c « o 

8 8'g 



U c o o 
»■> <D"0 -r .s 



3 f>> 



T3b 
T o 



> c 



"§■2 



la 



iHOj^oiNocf ion 

Hf»t>iOION(Ct>t» 



CMt~CMtOOLO.-lO.-iLO 
-H <-l — I HWNNN 



.-i<otoo5 0)CM05CM'«f<o 



toiointstotcoixtot< 



tOO5000C0C.-iCM0C1 , O5 



oeMt^eo^t^oto.-'to 



05 •f* -<r •«*<" oo* of -"t to" to" o» 



o>tooc«-it~-*i'to^tooo 

-<f iO iH OJ «C CO •<* iO CO 
oc oc aT f-" tO* of O* O rH CM* 



CMCMCM HHHCCN 



OCNMO^XHiflOH 



oco-fa>oc<o©t>tooj 
eo oc io cm i-i oa hn 



HTft»f H(CXO)tfilO 

HWa>NO>00)00)« 
lO rH »0 OOCvJ O »H <DC0 00 

to* (0 ec oo i-T ©* ©* <-* of 



toeot^^i'eO'-toeoeocM 

OWOMHHHHOlTf 

oj i-j oo oc eo o -<r >o cn_ 
oo*to*LO*a*©*«-*o5*o5*'*i*LO* 



•oo^nooTt^oJt^-w-^' 
•aio;rj<eoio<-iooa5C^ 
• eo w eo <5i>ou5i>c^ 



■Hio'fcatOHON 

■NOXOJWNtf t> LO 

' © cm* cm* oo V to to* t> a* 



0>0>0>0>J>OOiff>0>0) 



f noxh ocococt^m 
OOt-O^-^ 1 t>«tcit-o 

a«» rH CO Ol >— I >— ' ^ 



t'OI'MO Cft «-> 00 

■»r o<7i<of i-iojeo 

OJ1-" 05CM^ 



ifMOMO 
NOlt-XO) 



OtONHfl) 
05 50 C> © t> 



i>®iHHin oooc. 

l~ CM Tj< 05 oc to < 
t>^^H<-i0J 00 OJ ' 



losflono oococxco 
o t> o ai o ©asaseoto 
o o oo n iocohhu 



O tO t- C5 

oo ^ © oo © 

CM 05 »-i t-i CM 



ojtcoojif hh(o 

tOOCLOOtO O^fH 
00 HHH OJCMCM 



©O50J-fO5 HOIOJ-O'-h 

OHTf oo> HHOicn 

CM >~i CM >~l »H tO M 00 



tO OJ CM tO TJ" 0C OC OJ OJ —I 

"tt-oceooo .-< -<r ©> to to 

CO 50 OJ •— i 0J 05^^i<-ii-i 



t> tO OJ CM U5~HU0t>00 

o ai lo oc to © to co lo cm 

t- ■>* CM CM CO 0JC-05.-HO5 



a> to lo t> t- to co o 
■f oc -<r © © © lo eo 



cm to to o^oaoi 

O(00^t- i-i CM t- O CM 
CO CO —( — i CM t-LOCMO0CC 



tO 0C CM © 
CM © © 00 t> 

fX«H« 



t~- LO Oi tO CM t- LO t> 

nxxHio oc-eo 

t--HHMN 05 CM 



iilii 

S C ej id ei 



U'lfj 



® _ 

i o c 
E 
c 



^82 

c 



Ul~9 ill 

t ^ ^ c g c g£ 1 g g 



Maryland State Department of Education 



9:{ 



TABLE 36 



Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies: Maryland County 
High Schools: by Year, 1948-54, and by County: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Year and 
County 


Social 

•+- 
o> 

T3 

a 

u 
O 

JS 

+J 
t> 


Studies 

a> 

2 
o 

JS 

00 


Civics and Social 
Studies 


World History 


European History 


United States 
History 


Problems of 
Democracy 


Geography 


Economic 
Geography 


Sociology 


Consumer 
Education 


Negro History 


Personal Problems 
and Psychology 


1 
1 

pq 


1947-48 


1,638 


2,044 


1,384 


645 


81 


928 


678 


252 


356 


83 


180 


79 


25 




1948-49 


1.827 


2,312 


1,606 


1,092 


15 


858 


383 


186 


214 






141 


45 


77 


1949-50 


1,995 


2,446 


1,704 


1,191 


18 


1,072 


499 


294 


128 






87 


130 


104 


1950-51 


2,452 


2,461 


1,765 


1,406 


16 


1,156 


729 


320 


123 


129 


34 


112 


379 


59 


1951-52 


2,882 


2,818 


1,944 


1,205 


20 


1,407 


831 


170 


189 


139 


8 


70 


361 


36 


1952-53 


3,064 


2,959 


2,144 


1,352 


58 


1,410 


907 


206 


282 


158 


24 


39 


294 


112 


1953-54 


3,205 


2,998 


2,197 


1,757 


17 


1,503 


964 


207 


150 


85 


12 


89 


223 


64 



BY COUNTY, 1953-54 



Allegany 


28 


27 


18 




17 




28 
















Anne Arundel . . . 


426 


386 


321 


187 




212 


144 
















Baltimore 


390 


337 


274 


218 




119 


99 
















Calvert 


130 


122 


95 


57 




32 


18 
















Caroline 


80 


81 


67 


52 




33 


32 


















38 


44 


42 


29 




35 




















54 


41 


34 


34 




20 


i3 












i3 




Charles 


249 


192 


172 


80 




95 


55 


i3 










21 






42 


135 




39 




78 






126 












Frederick 


51 


99 




59 




35 


46 


92 














Garrett 






























Harford 


U9 


106 


87 


86 




69 


57 




24 














91 


89 


67 


62 




50 


32 












43 




Kent 


88 


65 


52 


52 




38 


26 
















Montgomery. . . . 


250 


193 


155 


36 




91 


20 












60 




Prince George's . 


434 


402 


314 


286 




228 


143 










89 






Queen Anne's . . . 


65 


79 


74 


58 




36 


22 
















St. Mary '8 


115 


87 


84 


58 




42 


17 


















157 


121 


98 


98 




84 


72 












52 


34 


Talbot 


114 


92 


78 


67 




56 


















Washington 


34 


32 


18 


25 






36 
















Wicomico 


102 


136 




85 




85 


60 


102 






12 




34 


30 


Worcester 


148 


132 


147 


89 




65 


44 

















* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXVII. 

I Includes classes taught by teachers certified in social studies; the remaining classes in this subject appear in 
TABLE 40. 



94 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



< a 
o 



CM CM CO to 

oo m eo in 



CO O CM 

oo oo co 

CM 



t-CTS^OOOCMOiOiOO"* 
i-lCftCM-^mCM-fCOOUO 



•»*,-i-^<^,-i©cocoeMa> 

COOOO^COiCrJ'CO'^'iO 

w * -* eo w tea hci o 

NNfiNHHHNHIN 



eo coco coco 
th eo 



CM-HOiCMeOOOOCOOiOOO 

o> . H . c i. H . H . T, l. 00 . o> . a l c i 

co^^cocococococo'* 



tC CO CM 
CM 00 



05 '5 

CO 



ioooco«05NOocoo 

CM'-i-'*CM<-ICMu0kO''*iO 



05 5 



cocoa>c~©eooocMCJ>t> 

COCMCMCOCM H 



COCOCMOi>-<iOCO©CiCM 

oceotoeo-#a5i-<o>eo<o 



•ce o> to 

•th eo i-h 



5 c 
c.2 



•<3<ioeocoa5CMOcocMas 

tl^ O "3 "* CO_ -tf CO^ CO_ 

co of c> cm oc aTo i-H CM CO 



oi>eoeo»-ieO'-nrtcftCM 
t^ooooc-ocot^coasm 
cm^ « t> t> o t> t> eo_ cc o 
oWooo'o'h co't^io 



• eo©eo<-iooio-<j<eo'<j« 
•»-iCM'-it>ajcM005eo 

' (Oo"h ^-rCM*-* tfT W 



■ lOTfcoeocoeoascMO 
• t>r-icMcoo-*ooosco 

•iCCOt^-CfOOOWCMOS 



eocM'-Heot> co i—< 

■<t lOHOlO) CM Oi t- »-i 
tHOSCM <-« LO C0 i-i CM t> 



I CM **< lO CO CM 



•tjiiocot^ooosOi-iCMeo 

OSCTiOiOOiOiCJiCTiCJiOi 



cm ij* oo i— i eo 



eo co oo "«1< eo 

Ctft^CMCO 

eo oo .-h cm 



a cm co t> co 

HOOTft- 



W(OOt>H 
0> r-1 i-H i-I t> 
iO->* CM CM CO 



co eo co co 

©0> CO 00 CM 
t- »-H CM i-I 



HTf o-^ 1 eo 
t-icm t> oeo 

t^iOCMCO^ 



cm © eo oc © ct> © eo cm io oicoeo 

OOCOTfCO© 00r-tlOCMC- lO©r-l 

CMCOCM<-i© Or-irHi-n-l CT) CM CM 



oct^eoco'* cocMCMCMco eoocM 
©eooceox eoco©co-<j« ooxio 

CM CO CM <-l ■* C0 rH iH »-( rH © CO >— • 



ic i-i io co 
cj> co eo io cm 

CM t— CO »— I CO 



co-* oo eo 
cm ©cn oo 

•* OOCOtH 



>©©CMCM ©OlO 

> oc oo oo io oo 10 cm 



Is 

a c 
<3< 



"o_; 



to "3 



E-8 

CS CS CV.C O g 



b 

s 

£ 

c3 1 £j 



t Ctf • 

8 a." 
I!*!] 

OhO'OIKiE-' 



2 o 

sis 
£££ 



i* 

is! 

8« 5 

u< ° 

ch e 

,J= c 

1- i O "T 

Cy CO i 
— * OTf 

rt.c i 
>-wCM 
O rnS 
E *2 

u o - - 
ou 2 

111 

2- cC 

S at 

3 3 2 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



TABLE 38 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science : Maryland County High 
Schools: by Year, 1948-54, and by County, Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Year and 
County 



Science 



2 


0> 


c 


o 


.8 


J 


Sc 


to 


TJ 


TJ 




.2 


Relat 


a 
a 


< 



1947- 48 

1948- 49 

1949- 50 

1950- 51 

1951- 52 

1952- 53 

1953- 54 



1,353 


1,864 


1,409 


664 


26 


243 


639 


298 


241 


181 


1,543 


1,911 


1,544 


1,265 


78 


89 


549 


156 


279 


33 


1,741 


2,167 


1,528 


1,190 


57 


157 


581 


307 


92 


61 


1,557 


1,733 


1,919 


1,673 


130 


201 


771 


403 


172 


92 


2,241 


2,230 


2,128 


1,553 


225 


250 


697 


356 


123 


19 


1,965 


2,166 


2,398 


1,612 


310 


103 


679 


379 


57 


50 


1,915 


2,203 


2,664 


1,881 


367 


186 


613 


261 


170 


22 



BY COUNTY, 1953-54 





28 


27 


18 


17 


17 












Anne Arundel 






318 


271 


164 




27 


33 






Baltimore 


390 


337 


274 


207 


23 


103 




42 






Calvert 


130 


122 


101 


73 






2i 




24 




Caroline 


80 


81 


66 


52 






31 








Carroll 


38 


44 


42 


29 






35 








Cecil 


54 


41 


33 


35 






20 








Charles 


248 


194 


172 


134 


53 




21 








Dorchester 




135 


126 


84 






39 




9 




Frederick 


5i 


99 


92 


43 






17 




12 




Garrett 


























44 


87 


86 






67 




37 


22 




90 


92 


69 


65 








20 






Kent 


88 


65 


52 


52 






38 


14 






Montgomery 




193 


154 


50 


88 






24 


is 




Prince George's 


81 


55 


434 


222 




37 


98 


18 








64 


74 


66 


24 






18 








St. Mary's 


115 


87 


84 


44 








8 






Somerset 


157 


121 


98 


98 


22 


26 


50 


27 






Talbot 


119 


92 


81 


67 






55 


28 






Washington 


34 


32 


18 


25 








24 






Wicomico 




136 


132 


114 






45 


23 






Worcester 


148 


132 


147 


89 




20 


31 




70 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXVII. 
t If given in other than 7th and/or 8th grades. 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



Commer- 
cial and 
Business 
Arith- 
meticj 


NWNWaiOIOfflHO 
ON 00 O <-l.<ON«)U5N 
f?*H rH r-Tr-T tHfHCM* 


Vocational 
and 
Applied 
Mathe- 
matics 


OOOOrHTf tOOPJiHiHH 
LO LO "tf tO iO t>- t- rICC 


Mathe- 
matics 
Review 




Solid 
Geometry 


■*jiccr-iosc^©t-cocot> 


Trigono- 
metry 


cot— cocccot^^i't^osco 

<C(0(0(0 01000>HW 
t-t-OSOSiOiOCSCCOirH 
1—1 


Plane 
Geometry 


t>to-<j<Treo-<fcco>eo<<f 
t-cscO'-iccLOtoc-eoas 

00 irt O IN <N OS_ CO 

co co co co cm co co co co ^ 


Algebra II 


co-<*t>oot-~t-co-«i , mio 
t-ecfocceocMaseoco 
as co cc ic w "<* as_ eo_ o» 

CM* CM* CM* *-* CnT CM* CM* CnT CO" CO* 


Algebra I 


©CM-tftO-tfaiCMtOCOCC 
CM t- CM « CO <N t^t-^Cft CM_ 

to •*!* tfrn-ifLO iqio to t> 


j 

General 
Mathe- 
matics II 


COO-tfCOCOCCCMOS^LO 
IONP5MOHP3 0)U3H 
(O CM CO ■«*« t> tO CM lO 


General 
Mathe- 
matics I 


ioast>T)«t>io-^<cMCM«o 

COLOtO-«*CMLOCM-«*t>t- 

wocjtp <o.co_t>^i-<cn t-_cn 
t> LO* CO* t— * oo* oo" o as* o* o 


Mathematics 


8th Gradet 


•CMO>r-icccsLOt-oscM 

•CMOOasCMCOCOCOO© 
• C-."'* °C CO «o «o 
' to* i-T CM* CM* LO* to* to* CO* 


7th Gradet 


• CMt-ecoLOecooos 

■TjtOtOi005COt>005 

• C> rH OJ CO^CO O tO 00 
' O* CM* CM* co* -<r* to* t-* t-* o» 



2 
3 ° 

p 



Tjnotot-ooosoi-icMeo 
ososcsososasososcscs 



• «-H • tC tC O 'HMO 

• —1 'HH fH -CM CO 
•CM • *-< CO 



ifH-t • O 



Hioeotoo '•f os r- oo lo -<f as lo -*j> 

CMC-.-11-ieO OS OS CO tO OS CO CM ^ »— I to 
CO CO t- »-< i-H 00 



"5 co to co as 

© © CS CM 00 
CO CM CO 



■f to -too •'f as cm 

CMrH -COt- eOCMOO 

LO .-H —t 



cm i—* co oo to cMi-icotot- as co -<f o t- o co t~ to m locot- 
ihtjiiocco oo lo as <-h as c oo cm o -foot-osio o co co 
to lo as r~i cmt-i 1-icm »-i cm «-i co >-iih co cm «— < 



OO00HC0 OtOtCt— LO 
CM ■«* CM t> »-l rtOOrHLON 

tOt>H T-H Tf CM i-H LO 



as to co co 
loos to as 
CM CO iH cc 



■f (CHOOS OSCMt- 
OCM-O"-^© 00 CO LO 
T i-H-d-l 00 f-H 



•<f©o0"tfeo -"ttotot-CM 
coLot-cMco o as lo oo to 

CM 00 i-< CM t^-«l<CMCMCO 



LO CM LO to CO 

as to Colo cm 

CM t~ CO "H CO 



loeotooto o-focooo 

LOt>©Tft> ^NNOtC 
rj< CM r1 ^ CM C-LOCMCOt> 



tO^COCMCM COLOOSCMCM 

cm o as cc t-h eococcooLO 
Tj>ooeoi-ito t-HtHHfq 



be as 
a> c 
=3 C 



|| 8 



5) O (J j,. 

" t: c* c g 



hc*3*35 rtoljaog rtrtoojO 

<<jmocj uouQfc offiffiWS 



§1- 

•C 3 ^ § es 



sis 



5 2 

CS i 

»! 
Sal 

8(02 
as o t: 

■a >J 
S c ^ 

O as <r 

s « i 

££§ 
°* 

ll| 
III 
|U 

^ 3C 



Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



TABLE 40 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and Business 
Education: Maryland County High Schools: by Year, 1948-54, and by 
County, Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Yeab and 

County 



Mathematics 



E 

■3 .a 



O 



a 



6 



TJ as 



ce a 
> 



1947- 48 

1948- 49 

1949- 50 

1950- 51 

1951- 52 

1952- 53 

1953- 54 



1,612 
1,819 
1,995 
2,471 
2,877 
3,069 
3,306 



1,962 
2,229 
2,331 
2,500 
2,823 
2,928 
3,124 



1,222 
1,396 
1,467 
1,459 
1,742 
2,186 
2,450 



195 921 

123 1,001 

187 1 1,028 

382 i 1,153 

116 959 

172 1,010 

151 1.223 



319 


58 


344 


356 


422 


229 


311 


35 


329 


176 


380 


386 


330 


14 


394 


145 


556 


474 


449 


19 


325 


513 


584 


656 


287 


79 


353 


551 


632 


897 


311 


96 


451 


324 


354 


1,016 


439 


131 


438 


216 


387 


1,416 



BY COUNTY, 1953-54 



Allegany 


28 


28 






18 


11 










Anne Arundel 


426 


386 


321 




290 




120 








Baltimore 


390 


337 


274 




118 


44 




54 


55 


24 




130 


122 


87 




48 


9 










Caroline 


81 


81 


40 




45 


20 




si 






Carroll 


38 


44 


42 




35 












Cecil 


53 


41 


33 












is 


55 


Charles 


248 


207 


166 




58 


83 




49 




21 


Dorchester 


42 


135 


126 




26 


27 




62 






Frederick 


51 


99 


92 




13 


12 




34 






Garrett 






















Harford 


li9 


106 


87 










43 


30 


62 




90 


90 


67 




i3 


i9 










Kent 


88 


65 


52 




35 


10 




12 






Montgomery 


228 


193 


135 




89 




ii 


11 


64 




Prince George's 


560 


511 


413 




83 


68 






28 


146 


Queen Anne's 


64 


79 


74 




40 










24 


St. Mary's 


115 


87 


84 




58 


42 




ii 






Somerset 


157 


121 


98 




92 


27 




23 


26 


30 


Talbot 


114 


92 


78 






63 










Washington 


34 


32 






18 


23 








25 


Wicomico 


102 


136 


34 




155 


23 




60 






Worcester 


148 


132 


147 




39 


18 




42 







* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. Also see TABLE 36. 



9h 



PLIGHT Y-ElGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE 41 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1945 to 1954 



Year Ending 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1945 


1,825 


2,986 


877 


1,645 


452 


762 


1946f 


1,721 


2,629 


915 


1,738 


446 


743 


1947f 


1,412 


2,227 


903 


1,652 


526 


712 


1948f 


1,282 


2,042 


832 


1,541 


455 


623 


1949f 


1,364 


2,086 


786 


1,295 


559 


745 


1950t 


1,684 


2,436 


937 


1,356 


720 


854 


1951f 


1,575 


2,369 


968 


1,492 


792 


949 


1952f 


1,563 


2,437 


1,008 


1,468 


927 


1,001 


1953f 


1,727 


2,476 


1,117 


1,521 


1,071 


999 


1954f 


1,919 


2,694 


1,411 


1,991 


1,238 


1,216 



TABLE 42 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: by Year, 1948-54, and by County, Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Year and 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


County 


















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 




Girls 


1947^18t 


23 


29 


22 


59 






20 


1948-49t 


16 


18 


45 


103 


4 




36 


1949- 50f 


22 


28 


90 


106 


13 




32 


1950-51t 


28 


49 


63 


136 


25 




68 


1951-52f 


30 


43 


78 


137 


31 




90 


1952-53f 


33 


40 


130 


186 


25 




88 


1953-54f 


46 


81 


196 


292 


21 




111 



BY COUNTY, 1953-54 



Anne Arundel . . 


10 


16 


37 


26 


13 


85 


Baltimore 






26 


40 






Calvert 






9 


20 












33 


58 






Dorchester .... 






22 


25 






Howard 






15 


12 






Montgomery . . . 






6 


25 




26 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 






11 


27 








5 


13 






Somerset 






14 


13 






Talbot 






17 


27 






Washington .... 






1 


6 








30 


50 










Worcester 


6 


15 











* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Figures include duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1954 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXVII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



99 



TABLE 43— White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1945 to 1954 



Year Endin<; 


Industrial 


AGRICULTURE 


Home Economics 


June 30 












Arts 


Education 




General 


Vocational 


1945 


8,813 


1,072 


1,511 


9,689 


2,841 


1946f 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947f 


14,090 


1,227 


2,110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948f 


15,414 


1,119 


2,629 


16,165 


1,596 


1949f 


17,744 


982 


2,822 


16,707 


2,300 


1950f 


21,619 


1,488 


3,199 


18,989 


2,532 


1951t 


24,739 


1,538 


4,174 


20,667 


2,566 


1952f 


25,988 


1,499 


3,480 


23,399 


2,032 


1953f 


28,479 


1,332 


2,965 


24,963 


1,829 


1954| 


30,736 


1,503 


2,988 


27,472 


1,254 



TABLE 44 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: by Year, 1948-54, and by County, 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Year and 
County 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 












Arts 


Education 




General 


Vocational 


1948t 


1,533 


221 


1,084 


2,277 


1,068 


1949f 


1,599 


282 


1,247 


2,533 


1,275 


1950f 


2,099 


204 


1,083 


2,929 


1,023 


1951f 


2,815 


341 


1,265 


3,333 


1,168 


1952t 


3,567 


269 


1,023 


3,538 


1,130 


1953} 


3,635 


390 


990 


3,927 


999 


1954f 


3,871 


512 


981 


4,463 


725 



BY COUNTY, 1953-54 



Allegany 


25 


25 




20 


21 


Anne Arundel .... 


269 


153 


54 


707 




Baltimore 


505 


21 




455 


20 


Calvert 


47 




50 


174 


52 


Caroline 


90 




42 


33 


73 


Carroll 


81 






53 


27 




98 






63 


34 


Charles 


223 


39 


59 


151 


74 




152 




67 


142 


57 


Frederick 


152 






96 


46 


Garrett 












Harford 


239 






219 




Howard 


110 




92 


139 




Kent 


112 




43 


106 


68 




263 


157 


16 


273 


22 


Prince George's . . . 


456 


117 


209 


670 


84 


Queen Anne's 


96 




54 


100 


36 


St. Mary's 


44 




85 


93 


57 




262 






259 




Talbot 


142 




63 


131 


20 


Washington 


71 






73 






235 




62 


294 






199 




85 


212 


44 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any. 

For 1954 enrollment in individual schools see TABLE XXVII. 



100 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 45— White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1945 to 1954 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1945 


7,654 


11,217 


1,782 


2,199 


12,507 


14,457 


lyioj 


15,304 


18,981 


7,104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 


1947f 


16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22,517 


22,585 


1948f 


19,624 


22,866 


10,058 


10,058 


24,631 


24,414 


1949f 


21,929 


24,141 


10,471 


10,435 


27,211 


26,769 


1950f 


23,800 


26,374 


11,940 


11,513 


30,049 


29,236 


1951f 


26,806 


29,276 


12,889 


12,853 


34,094 


32,955 


1952f 


28,275 


30,650 


15,339 


15,253 


35,768 


34,101 


1953f 


29,325 


31,470 


16,769 


16,327 


38,375 


35,954 


1954f 


30,811 


32,788 


18,548 


17,674 


40,727 


37,927 



TABLE 46— Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: by Year, 1948-54, and by County, Year 
Ending June 30, 1954 



Year and 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


County 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1948f 


3,017 


3,584 


823 


777 


3,154 


3,503 


1949f 


3,322 


3,844 


1,217 


1,054 


3,717 


4,354 


1950f 


3,552 


4,051 


1,301 


1,166 


4,147 


4,504 


1951f 


4,624 


5,133 


1,601 


1,712 


5,046 


5,656 


1952f 


4,951 


5,421 


1,656 


1,732 


5,409 


6,004 


1953f 


5,063 


5,310 


1,742 


1,716 


5,710 


6,271 


1954f 


5,313 


5,470 


2,094 


1,842 


6,095 


6,270 



BY COUNTY, 1953-54 



Allegany 


54 


47 






14 


14 


Anne Arundel . . 


550 


691 


390 


24i 


698 


788 


Baltimore 


706 


664 


491 


399 


734 


702 


Calvert 


182 


171 


136 




213 


196 


Caroline 


178 


163 


41 


35 


178 


143 


Carroll 


91 


97 


10 


17 


91 


97 


Cecil 


70 


75 






98 


97 


Charles 


287 


340 


125 


179 


870 


403 


Dorchester .... 


173 


152 






253 


232 


Frederick 


242 


233 


24 


28 


186 


192 
















Harford 


272 


252 


33 


34 


272 


252 


Howard 


176 


168 






205 


183 


Kent 


157 


164 






157 


164 


Montgomery . . . 


161 


263 


97 


126 


299 


383 


Prince George's 


728 


748 


675 


729 


874 


1,005 


Queen Anne's . . 


171 


167 






171 


167 


St. Mary's 


199 


204 


25 


ii 


130 


152 


Somerset 


198 


211 






262 


259 


Talbot 


185 


148 






224 


206 


Washington. . . . 


72 


73 


47 


37 


72 


73 




199 


172 






318 


308 




262 


267 






276 


254 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any, and enrollment from junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition to 
last four years as previously reported. 

For 1954 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXVII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



Distrib- 
utive Ed- 


O 




cq 


o n m io m t- io q <fl 


I 


o 




« 




■ 


o 






!« 


° SSiSSSSSSS 


H 




• 


O 




CQ 




H 







CQ 




Personal 
and 

Typing 


O 






Commer- 
cial or 
Economic 
Geography 


« SS23*§S5S§ 


CQ 




II 


C5 


SISIII! 


n 




ml 


o 






Bookkeep- 
ing and Ac- 
counting 


° 


2,306 
2,299 
2,465 
2,049 
1,954 
1,878 
2,811 
2,948 
3,323 
3,602 


CQ 


714 
610 
801 
712 
634 
632 
899 
946 
1,068 
1,092 






iilli 




1,370 
1,263 
1,505 
1,432 
1,859 
1,996 
2,437 
2,737 
2,762 
2,862 


it 


° 


mill!! 






Y'eak and 

County 


1944- 45. 

1945- 46. 
1946 47 

1947- 48 

1948- 49 

1949 50 

1950-51 

1951 62 

1952-53 

1953 54 





i-i oo t- • • 

•H N 




: : : : : : : : : : : : g : : 


: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2 : : : : : 


::g:: : :• * 


: : :2 g : : : :* 


: :g : : : !~ £ 


: :2 2 : : : :S 


$ £3 : :§ S : : :S : 


5 :§S& :*r59 * 


5 : :S 3 : : 3 : 


SSS : : ::::: fc 


: 5 : : : 


£S£ : : 


: 




:s : * 




3 :J- : : 


: :SS 2 : : 22^ 


N : SSSS : 


: ® : : - :• 


: SS : 


:2 : : S : : : : S : : 


: : : : : 5 : 


: S : : SS : : : : s : : 


SS|SS 22^2 : * : - 


g£§8S| SjJS 00 ;? : S :g 


§ :| :5j SS :S3 SSSSg g : :S : S 






gSggS sssss sgs^| gssss SSS 


g8S<»« gojc^g gSSSS 


Is|as iisii ssssg |§|s§ m 


gSSSS §8852 SSSSg 


§gj£8§ "S^S g2§3^f3 §£55 


s«2-s grs-s § s s-a 


Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Garrett 


1 1 1 



102 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



11 



"O h "S 

s « s 



I ° 

8. 



; C-l as co • co i< 



CC -00 -iH< 



B< 




II < 



t*?>OCJ ■ ^* co 

i-H Tj« « <0 ■ i-HT 



III 



■ X • «* 



B< 
as 

a 



,1111 



.2 S 3 



5 J 



3J§ 



■SB?* 

O W J2 O 

cl FT 



iiife 



3 *j Jx: 

j2 C U 

ill 

III: 



11 

« E 



•goo 



:1 8 



o a a 



11 



till 
Hi 



125 

c£y 



f Oi H L- <D X 

CO <N 



t-"*05 OhC •cgC0irt?C!C^HiC<Nevl'*X tc to 
— • CO C^l »H — i 



23 
II 



r- ■ 15 X 0C N N i 



:«3 



a 




Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



TABLE 49 — Enrollment in Driver Education and Training: Maryland County High 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



Total 


4,683 


1,980 


2,703 


Allegany 


283 


116 


167 




446 


218 


228 


Baltimore 


854 


365 


489 


Caroline 


98 


38 


60 


Carroll 


105 


42 


63 


Cecil 


79 


29 


50 


Dorchester 


78 


47 


31 


Garrett 


120 


51 


69 



Harford 

Howard 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



437 


224 


213 


211 


92 


119 


493 


167 


326 


653 


253 


400 


15 


10 


5 


124 


52 


72 


290 


88 


202 


213 


95 


118 


184 


93 


91 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



537 


243 


294 


75 


45 


30 


48 


16 


32 


75 


34 


41 



Total 

Anne Arundel 

Caroline 

Howard 



Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 

Talbot 

Wicomico 



25 


9 


16 


150 


62 


88 


48 


20 


28 


116 


57 


59 



104 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



o 
6 

Is 

O 3 



3 ns M 
o r «.B 



'2 3 
o «3 



" 3 

6*73 
C 



O « C 



2 = M 
O e» c 



o 

6 

be 

1 2 

I -ft 



o « c 



CM CM i-t CM lO i-i OC i£ to X 
O OOOO 

xinxio^toos-i— ixos<o 
oooooo ^ - 1 ^ 

CO CM ^ <0 t- <c 

»h cm -t i-i x <c 

t-mt^xenxcMi-HeMeoeoeo 

CMU3C-00i-<iOi-li/3CMCMXt- 

lfi<DHOO><fl 

Olt-OOONONHnffif 

OIOt'MO»'*P5H»U5Tf 

cm cm eo eo 

^HOOO-HO 

co-<i'CMeo©i-'eot-<ocoifc- 
niOLiioao 

__(,M,_(CM<N _ 

^•CO^eOUSlOrHi-HHi-teMeM 

»OSlXt-H 

i-i©i-iCM , '3'eOCM''1"*J , m<Ot- 

t^Tfo«oeooeO'^ , <-icccMW5 
CO i-« com ^ 

tH fH rH fH N W 

• ■ -XOSinXOCO 

ot^^-nc«»-ieMCMa5CM"*<c 

ft^HiCMO 

CM CM CM CM CM CO HrtH^N 

ONOt-nt» 

Tj«-«jieO'«J'iOiCiCMCMCMCMeneO 

oa>t't»X'« i ^xOHMa 

T CM tO CM »H CM 

CMi-H^rHCOCMlCtetOt^XX 

^rt^'f»-ikOO^OiioooiocM 

cm x eo eo x •«? 

ooxomnooocjccui 

CM CM i—c CM CM CM riyJtvfrfrj 

ec^HTfict^mcftCMineccc'O' 
a? eo ■* os o cc 

CMCMCOCMCMX^i-iCM^CMCM 

©tCi-«i-i©co<eeoiei.oce<e 

i-i «C CM OC « <C 

CMCMeOeOeOeO«-«-ieMCMeMCM 

cnt~LcocM«a>cr»tcoo<ocM 

CMCM-WOCMOC 

eoxx-tfit^cMCMCMXWX 
o>t>ososi-irftox-*j<t-os© 

CM 1 ** «Ct-Otfi 

XXt-XWOiiOWiOWNt' 

HHOimOOONOXO>N 

h t» x o cc 

t~ t> X OS O OCM"* 

cs©i-ieMeo'<} , os©i-ieMeO"* 
^tmiOknmiflTfioi/jicnoio 

^OC^C1C^C^O)C^OC^A0>C^ 

o j* 
■*->r3 3 

§1 



■ CM -H CM CM CM ( 



•O CO CM CM — < CM 



•-I CM H(i) 



• • CM IC 



•XinnO) t» CM CO 



00 <£> CO "J- 
iT5 U5 CM i-l 


cm t- io os os 


rH <C CO CO 

cm i-i en 


CM «T> CM ^ 


if i-> 


ccooo i-i 


c~ m x <c 

•H CM — ^H'f 


CM tO Cft O i— < 
m CM i-i 1" 


CMXXi-HO 
i-l CM CM 

CM 


O CO 
O CM i-i 


CM O CO CM CO 
i-l CM 


^< t- i-l lO t> 


■lOKHf 


os.-i.-i cm 

CM 


^ •«> 


CM U> 


©00 5OCM1' 


CM X Tf if 


CM ■ CO CM W 
CO • 


OS 00 


•H CM t> 


CO CM 00 to CO 
HH CM 


■ «o t- 


era ic x to 

iO 


OS i-l «5 


**Xi-it-CM 
rtTfiO i-i 


f CM O O 0C 

cm eo 


CM »H if 


•fn seioos 

CM i-> 


(O CM 


t- CM CO CO 
t~©X«-*CM 
•H CM 


•-" ^ iC CO t- 

mioeocMOs 


m CM i-> CM 

CM 


if OS X t— CM 

■V CM CM 
CM 


como 

OS 00 CM 


wee© cm 
co> m 


•"I" t> CO -< 

1-1 fH 


CM O -t t- 

CM 


«# cceoio 

00 • 


«CM^ 


icxxeoeo 

—c (O 


X OS 00 t> 


OOMf if 
i-i i-l CM 


_ !0 CM if 


OS ■ 


eM-*ft-iom 

CMCMt- 


t— •— I C- t— CM 
— < CM i-i 


CO -*t- CM CO 


<oif ©eoeo 
eo »i i-i 


io cm eo 

CM *-> 


X-* OS OS CM 
00 (C CO ^ 


CM X OS OS X 
CO CM 00 


i-i CM t- 


t-'^'OXOO 
O iH iH 


x «o X 

CM CM 


©CO ■* t- CM 
CO 00 CO iH CM 


HiflfNX 
t- X CM CM © 


eoxt>cocM 
CM"«f eo^x 


XXOiHiO 
« CM CO 

CM 





S ct 



2c 

6* ^ 



- S||g| -1151=3 ||| 

UU UOOPfc OKKWS fcCwMH 



( . L «« CJ o ct J 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



d 

^ 3 



ass &e 

O rt C 



= 2 

II 



5— M 
O rt C 



.5 3 

If 



S=2 M 
O « C 



6,4 

.S3 

II 

O 3 



3:5 M 

5 * c 



... • 
io ^ cm cm cm^ho — h • 

©CMH O 

IflON <D<OCMCM<-l coco 
OHO o o 

■!0 0)H<»0 ■lOffflhO 
NONHN 

Ot>MHTf (Srf HOO>NM 

t-<fO<DtH(flWH<ff]f 
NNNOOH 

MOHHHH 

lONHNTfO>ONWOC»l» 
■»!" CO *t <0 CO N 

HIC00Nt'-lO>U500t-O)«O 

CMCO ^5 Tj-TT 

e*>o>iou5o>CMeoa>i-icccca> 

« io x o t- 1- 

o rj< t- cc cm «-l 

fH CM <-< 1-1 «-l 

WNNHHH 

HNNM CM 

HjlWf nee 

r-enoouC'CMCMi-iooot'-eosfi 

HNccceci 1 

rH ec eo w tc uj 

ooaawNNHOono 
co c~ t- mo> a> 

COOOWHO 



t- Tf tf 00 

r-t Cft 00 t" 00 O >— < I •— I ' 

CMCMCOCMCOTf 

CM CM CO CM CO Tf 

t-OOCMiftOtOiOt^m^DOOi-l 

— i cm eo co cm rr 

ih cm eo eo cm eo 

Tf-^t-OClrtCOCMCMCMCMOai 

i-i eo «£> «o tj< 

i-i eo 10 uo <o r}> 

C0i-HCM'HC0'tC£>«3i-it-CMC^ 
OOCiXOX H i-l 

t-i-Heot^c?>coco^Heoi-Hooco 
cji t~ co h ^i eo 

© OC i-i CT> CM O <-H CM CM CM CM 
_ _ CM -H CM CM 



— en 

a- 



31 



OHCMCOI'CftOHCMeO-^' 

usioiomiOitwvnu'jioin 

00)0)C7^C7)C7)C7)C7)C^CAC7) 



' CM ■ CM CM eo 



U)*f -iH CM -CM • ■ CM CO • rj" O CM CM CM • 05 



CM «£> -lH CM CM < 



to t- cm cm eo eo 



• eo • eoi 



i-H ■ CM CM 



•cm -co cr> -eo- 



CM CO t- ONClif H HrtN 



Tj» lO CMCOOOOJi 



t-eOCM^J 1 HHMI 



I us o • UO 



2| 

HIM 

= C s s rt 



O C 00 



ea « o £° 



2 86 



8j 



"ail 

X ■- z 



106 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



u 

03 

© 

00 
U 

ct 

0) 

«- 
3 

© 



3 



S Si 



m 



1-4 O 

© 

a S3 

fa 
© 

OO 

3 

© 



o 
6 

.£-5 

II 

O 3 
faW 

c 

1 



3di m 
o « c 
^fa~ 



H 

O 3 
fa «} 

be 
.£ 

'3 
fa 



o « c 



II 

O 3 



g rt c 
Hfa~ 



|.| 



5 — to 

h fe- 



ci CM .-lit ■ CM <T. ■ 

© O 

OO* ooo 

ifftoxxifft~-t^xi—iff , *fo 
o o o o o c 

iffr~coxi-ii~xt^xxo 

X CO CM iff it 'it 

NNCCKMW -h-h r-n~i 

HietCCHC-.XMOlOO^N 

o oc eo t- oc o 

CCCCCC^^CC^ a— i r- ihh 

xcMiffXiff-tOi-iiffiffx-t 
oooooo 

ON«(00«<eK5:«HW 

CMXXXiff -«t 

— i O O O -i o 

oxxi-ixoo— ixoo^ 

NrtNNNM _ ,h _ _ 

x iff it t~ iff o 

f~ifftcc-xxi-iCMXXift 

0)NiflCO0>0i00t»001"<f 

HXCowNWMinioat- 

t~x«oxOi-nt<ot>-xr"-t~ 

«Tf Mfint" 

oooooo 

xc^xooeMi-ioxoiffx 

OOOOHH 

ocoiffoiffitxot^iffxo 

HHHNNN i-li-ll-l 

05X00500 

iffiffiffifft~t>CMCMXX-tiff 

(OWXOifCJ 

axxjiHH^^Tf iot»x 

oc~oc-Oi-ii-ic~iffx«oiff 
in^<cint»x 

OOCOHH 

XOC~iti-li-ilffO^Hlffiff^H 
if (OlOOXCi 

OOOlHl-l-H 1-1 

iaiOH»Nino!cct-H(co) 
xait'WCTiri 

-*t <T. X -*1< X 

•tititTtiftcMCMCMXXX 
xoc-cmoc~ 

t~t~«OXl>Xititit<OOCO 
OO-tCMXtOO-HCMXit 

rf m m ic ic iff if ui u 1 : iff l» ui 

.^OOOOOOOOOOOO 

T' 

II 2 



NOWh • 




•cm - eo 






t- i-i iff it CM 


eo • ^t eo o 


. .to . <o 

■ CM 


O • IH • X 
CM • 


CM i-< CM 


O Iff X iff CM 

x cm 




• CM tO • O 
• CM 


x i-( t • co 

CO 


CJ i-i CO 


■ ^t eo • • 




■ • • •« 


O* • • -iH 


CO ■ ■ 


; i -r — ■ • 


i-l • • -CM 


• 1-1 • • X 


X • i-l ■ CM 




X X 00 -i-l 

1-HCM • 


i-l Iff ' CI CO 


•XflHO) 


O i-l it i-i it 

X 


t~- x co 


x t> © cm x 

i? iff o 


iixt>o«o 


CM O O i— 1 1— 
i-l iff 


CM CM iff X O 

o 


t» X i-< 


iff xeo 


«Xt-H« 


CM O i-l CM t- 

1-1 X 


X X O ^> X 
O i-l rH 


t~- t> iff 
CM i-i 


■ X — ' ■ • 


CM • O CM O 


• i-l X i-l CM 


iff i-i • • CO 

CM • • 


CO • • 


eo t— iff • • 

CM • ■ 


cm cm • eo cm 


•NHHCO 


to ... . 




iff o eo • eo 

1-1 it • 


eo t »-i cm i-t 


• CM t> 'iff 


iff • O X X 

CM • 


t- o • 


eo iff o 


>(OXt»* 
iH CM 


CMOCO -H^| 


O • O X X 
X ■ i-< 


CM it • 
CM 


X t- O i-l iff 

eo x x 


it CM iff ^t tO 
•~i CM i~i i-l CO 


cm it ^t eo ^t 

i-i X CM O 


(Oi^NHW 


O 6" • 

Tt 1-1 • 


• oxeo ■ 


• CM O • X 


X CM • CM ">t 


O i-l CM CM i-l 


CM • • 


cm x ^ eo 
eo 


• CO ^ CO CO 








iff x^eo i-i 
eo 


iff ^ iff CO to 


iff X -CM 
•CM 


i-l ■ CM -CM 


CM CM n 


iff ooeo • 

CMCMX 


O CM X t— i? 
CM i-l 


•OXOCM 
iff 


CMrHt-XO 
O rl 


iH X CM 


CM iff CM CM iH 

eo iff o —i 


f Xt»«H 


X»ff ox-* 

i-l i—l o 


i—i CM CM iff O 

O 1-H 1-1 


iff 



— 

c 

3 0) 

S c *2 
a c S 



11 

"3 d 



3 a;^ 



x S3 

B 

Qfa 



CJ O C9 ^ u 
CJ O OJ o 



h 

SB," 



IP II 



•§£ i 

■£ o V 
Z P h 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



.5-3 

ii 

O 3 



3S3 M 
O « C 



o 

.S-S 
Ii 

O 3 
be 



o r cs c 



o 
Z 

.S-S 

I! 

O 3 



o r ca c 



= 3 

i4 



O M C 



CM • lO • • CM CO 

o © o 



TfCMCO • • • • 

©i-lr-l 

• -tesTf -co ■ cocm • im 
o © © 

© -i ©CM 

©CMCMC-CO©eOCOXOSCMlrt 
©.-ICO — ©CM 

©cowcoc-''i<tco>©CMmco 

CM — — ©©© 

eocMX©t--<j<T}'— mkflinco 

—©©©©© 

t-cM^c^CMxmxsocoxcM 

— — CM — — — 

©UOt-COXtf3©t-i1«TrcM- 
— CM CO CO CO 

cm cm eo ■<* -^i" 

C M 1" ^ ^ O 5> 

<o© — ©xuoirtcMi- i x t- © 

CMCM — 

© CM CM © © — 

t>Xt-©©CM©t-C~XTj<CM 
©© — CM — — 

eo©-f©x©eoeo-'S<T)<io- 

OHNNNN 

NOOOlNMHHSOiOiHTl" 

eo useo eo © © 

co©co^ ©© 

cox- t-oxirt©- ©t-^eo 

T*C5©X©- 

U2 — ©©CM© — i-ii-l 

xcMiat~©t>x-<i<xx©cM 

— CM so CM 

OHNoeoH 
— — eo — cm 

© — — CM — — 

■*3<CMia- C0C-t1<©©©©u0 

i-i co co eg co 

— CM CO CO Cxi CM 
CO UO iff O © LT5 

eo ia ti< Tf 



©© — cmco-^©© — cmco-** 
u0 uo lo l.0 uo ** lo l.0 l.0 lo uo 

, ~. .T. 31 31 33 * 3 _ . 



3 c 
U o 



CO ■ — — 



' — CM— CM 



CM OS • CM CO 



•l© eO — CM 1 



•»hh • -CM 



I CO -CM ^J" i-l l« — • 



•CM — -CM( 



l"* CO -X' 



IS CM i© ■ CO i-l CM CM 



"ffO •COCMC0CO 



\ia © -xi 



4)3; 
j> O 

13 a 



2* 



X 

3 as" 5 



S3&.£o£ SaoSo tSjga 
OUUQfc CEffiWS tCMKh 



| £ 8 

sis 



1 



1 



I 



I 



1 



1 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



31! 



lilililfls 
ilPliiiif 



ilaslssssl" 



sssassssss 



IMSHlUs 



siiMilttt" 



liiiiiiiii 



lllllslgii 

Ulilliflt 



iijiiiiiii 



iliiiilll 



liiiiiiiii 







liiiiiiiii 



------- 

g— o. S = = = = o. 



S = — 2222' 



------222- 



rt N cr> m n ci 



C4 ^ _ - e:, ~, 



liiiiiiiii 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



5 


K 

OS 

5 


N.P. 


— iec*J'-<i'eo«ocMeoino , >eoxt-cn 


AG 


CULl 




00(CiOt-OOC-N-iO(?JOOU5<COO 

cn x 10 x x t> <o 




CD 


N.P. 


m-*Hf-*Hf»«eo©xt-ox-rj'cn 

CM rH rH CM CM CM CM 


MATICt 


3 




totoiotcLfiLo^ot^o^'fajtocM 

CM CM CM CO CM CM CO 


Mathe 


1 

>y8 


N.P. 


OCt-t-OOOOlWt-t-Ot-HH 
rH rn rH iCWOlt-OOifliO 
CM CM CM lO UO 


CD 


W. 


t~tomtotOHfuoeo-<ft>t~teeMeo 

CM O CC rH X CM t> 
CM CM -1 CO CM CM CM 




■ 


N.P. 


^eo^eoeo^nt-Mt-ioooN 
co f f t- a> to 


INCE 


3 




t-toi.ot-to<otot-a>t-t>t~t--<r 

CC »h O »^Oi o w 
CM CM CM CO CM CO CO 


w 


00 




cj> w w o a t- » 

rH CM CM CO CM CO CO 




pq 


w. 1 


e-tecoxt^wiaoiCMCimmeoeM 

H rH rH CO CO CM CM 


S 


— 


N.P. 


tCCNCC-Tfi^CO-TfKCONn 
CM CC m CC CM CM rH 


Studii 


5 


W. 


t-xc5C»cc©st~ec''i'-HTj«©-«a<eo 

0C0)O(0t0»O 
rH rH CM CM CM CM CO 


Social 1 


00 

c? 


N.P. 


Xt-^XXtOt-CMCMOirHOTfCn 

t- eo t- oc rH m m 

rH rH rH CM rH CM 


CQ 


£ 


tcmt^o>xxLQtoo>t>tommi}' 
co as eo o cm oc cn 

rH rH CM CM rH rH 






N.P. 


eOCOCO^COCOCOCOOCOinOCTiCO 
t- X t> O O CC CM 


LISH 


3 




C-t^XCJiXXXC^C^-COCOC^-COX 

Kacitciomo 

rH rH rH CM CM CM CO 


o 
z 
w 


00 

>» 


N.P. 


t~ Irt CO rH CM X t> 
rH rH rH CM CM rH CM 




Bo 




<* rH CM CM -rj< C7> rH 
rH rH rH CM CM rH CM 




rls 


N.P. 


THeoTfrj-eoeoeooeoaixmrHto 

0C«)OHONM 


a 


5 




OU?H}"ri"HSiTjtia0SOOCMi0e0«0 

o cm o eo rH to t> 


Co 


00 

>> 


N.P.t 


t-wtocnxxxrHtoiOrH-«*toto 

CM © CO t> CO CM W 
rH rH rH CM CM eo eo 




O 
CQ 


w.t 


t-tO-^flOiOTjiTftoCMt-eO^CMrH 
rH CO O lO lO Tf to 


Year and County 


XaiOrHCMCO-rJ'XajOrHCMCO'rJ' 
CncnO)C7>G)C7)CftCncncnG)CnC7>Cn 

"3 

Eh 1 

53 | 

fcl 1 

V o 
Cm H 



rH Ci cn 



eo to cm t- m 



CMCft meo io 



cm »f m a> 



m m to eo 



1 t-CMOieo 



oot-t-too 



■eorHcoo f- ocneo eo cm 



©iOOCMCM 



CM ■ W Ifl't 



x cm m cm co eo io e 



• t- rH Hf tO C~ t~ C5 



cm eo eo cm cm •"»• eo n-<<c 



XX«f CM- 



CM C- ^ i .O 



rHX-ft-W «t-lflXt- 



x <e to t- ai'-f i 



CO CT> ^ 



eo ■■* t-rHCMmm 



eo to x eo 



CM tO rH O t- LO tO -r» rf( 



co to x io eotoc-xt- 



XrH-r»CM 



t~ cm en x 



8slll 

<<CQUO 





: :& 




• . . ■ ® 


- :»8-s 




Carrol 
Cecil . 
Charlt 
Dorch 
Fredei 


eu O cu ■ ^? 

99 S3 O 0J O 





o c 

0J C 



5.2 o 



110 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 56— Number of Students in Maryland Colleges Who Prepared to Qualify for Standard 
Teaching Certificates in Maryland: 1951-1954 



i yve of Certificate 


1951* 


1952* 


1953* 


1954* 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


Grand Iotal 


777 


211 


679 


171 


681 


150 


607 


169 


iNUKoLni oOrtCMJL* AND 




















76 




38 




44 




35 




Elementary 


















120 Semester hours 


156 


109 


224 


73 


253 


86 


236 


88 


Junior High (Core) 


98 




73 




78 




78 


10 


High School 


















Total High School 


448 


102 


344 


98 


306 


64 


258 


71 


Agriculture 


30 


5 


10 


5 


12 


1 


7 


5 


Art 


20 


3 


21 




21 




19 


2 




7 


2 


9 


3 


9 


3 


7 


7 


English 


51 


18 


57 


15 


42 


6 


37 


9 


Foreign Language (any) 


16 


7 


16 


2 


13 


1 


13 


5 


Home Economics 


33 


7 


19 


9 


23 


8 


17 


4 


Industrial Arts 


32 


3 


27 


2 


28 


4 


19 




Library Science 




















23 


'4 


ii 


9 


13 


5 


ii 


3 


Music 


28 


3 


30 


9 


34 


7 


37 


5 


Physical Education: 


















Men 


66 


11 


40 


13 


31 


6 


24 


15 


Women 


24 


10 


14 


5 


11 


3 


11 


2 


Science: 


















All Sciences 


15 




21 












General Science 


5 


7 


2 


i 


ii 


2 


io 


2 


Biology 


7 


1 


5 


1 


4 






1 




2 




2 




1 








Physics 


1 




1 




3 






ii 


Social Sciences 


85 


2i 


56 


24 


50 


is 


46 


Speech 


3 

















* Calendar year. 

Note: Each student is counted only once (in his first, major). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



111 



TABLE 57— County Teachers in Service October, 1953, Who Attended Summer Schools 
and Evening Classes: Spring and Summer 1953 



County 


Teachers in Service Oct. 1953 Who 
Attended School in 1953 


School Attknded 


Number of Teachers 


Total 
Num- 
ber 


Number 


Per Cent 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 


Total 


Elem. 


High 



WHITE COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total White 


1,620 


824 


796 


16 


2 


19 


5 


Allegany 


Q1 




in 


10 


o 

□ 


lb 


f) 




100 


58 


42 


13 


8 


14 


2 


Baltimore 


311 


162 


149 


16 


2 


20 


5 


Ca\ vort 


12 


g 


g 


19 


3 


20 


7 




42 


26 


16 


43 


3 


24 


2 


Carroll 


62 


23 


39 


15 





23 


5 


Cecil 


37 


14 


23 


10 


9 


19 


2 




23 


9 


14 


13 





22 


6 


Dorchester 


19 


8 


11 


11 


1 


14 


7 


Frederick 


42 


16 


26 


9 


5 


13 


6 


Garrett 


48 


22 


26 


22 


2 


33 


s 


Harford 


37 


19 


18 


9 


3 


11 


8 


Howard 


34 


12 


22 


14 


3 


25 


9 


Kent 


14 


8 


6 


18 


6 


14 


3 




412 


241 


171 


29 





30 


9 


Prince George's .... 


152 


76 


76 


10 





13 


9 


Queen Anne's 


20 


8 


12 


17 


4 


25 





St. Mary's 


5 




4 


1 


7 


10 


5 


Somerset 


12 


8 


4 


15 




8 


5 


Talbot 


26 


7 


19 


13 





37 


3 


Washington 


83 


43 


40 


14 


9 


14 


3 


Wicomico 


23 


16 


7 


13 


5 


10 


3 


Worcester 


25 


9 


16 


15 


.8 


25 






Total 

University of Maryland 

George Washington University 
Johns Hopkins University . . . . 

Towson S. T. College 

West Virginia University 

Columbia University 

University of Delaware 

Western Maryland College. . . 
Pennsylvania State College. . . 

Shepherd S. T. College 

Catholic University 

New York University 

American University 

Bucknell University 

Fairmont Teachers College. . . 

Duke University 

Loyola College 

University of Pittsburgh 

Temple University 

University of Colorado 

Syracuse University 

Boston University 

California, Pa. S. T. College. . 

Peabody College 

University of Virginia 

Wilson Teachers College 

One Hundred Sixteen Others . 



1,620 


824 


666 


Q CO 


108 


55 


96 


65 


DO 


DU 


64 


17 


57 


25 


50 


34 


50 


17 


44 


13 


35 


31 


27 


6 


19 


3 


16 


6 


12 


7 


11 


11 


10 


4 


10 


1 


9 


4 


8 


4 


8 


4 


7 


1 


6 


5 


6 


1 


6 


5 


6 


4 


5 


4 


219 


84 



COLORED COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total Colored 


391 


199 


192 


25 


9 


29 


7 


Allegany 


1 


1 




16 


7 






Anne Arundel 


47 


27 


20 


28 


7 


30 


3 


Baltimore 


32 


15 


17 


19 


2 


23 





Calvert 


15 


8 


7 


22 


9 


30 


4 


Caroline 


14 


5 


9 


29 


4 


47 


4 


Carroll 


9 


4 


5 


44 


4 


50 





Cecil 


8 


5 


3 


55 


5 


30 





Charles 


23 


12 


11 


21 


8 


25 





Dorchester 


16 


10 


6 


30 


3 


26 


1 


Frederick 


5 


4 


1 


20 





6 


3 


Garrett 
















Harford 


i5 


i 


14 


5 





56 


6 


Howard 


4 


l 


3 


5 


3 


15 


8 


Kent 


5 


i 


4 


5 


9 


23 


5 


Montgomery 


45 


25 


20 


46 


3 


43 


5 


Prince George's. . . . 
Queen Anne's 


41 


20 


21 


16 





21 


6 


10 


6 


4 


35 


3 


23 


.5 


St. Mary's 


14 


8 


6 


33 


3 


31 


.6 


Somerset 


21 


9 


12 


30 





38 


.7 


Talbot 


20 


9 


11 


34 


6 


52 


.4 


Washington 


4 


3 


1 


50 





11 


.1 


Wicomico 


19 


12 


7 


29 


3 


25 


.9 


Worcester 


23 


13 


10 


39 


4 


35 


.7 



Total 

New York University 

Morgan State College 

Columbia University 

Temple University 

Catholic University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Howard University 

Pennsylvania State College 

Virginia State College 

American University 

Boston University 

Loyola College 

Hampton Institute 

Tuskegee Institute 

University of Pittsburgh . . . 
Johns Hopkins University . 
North Carolina College. . . . 

Storer College 

Syracuse University 

University of Michigan 
West Virginia S. T. College 
Thirty-one Others 



391 


199 


192 


104 


53 


51 


62 


52 


10 


34 


11 


23 


31 


15 


16 


15 


8 


7 


14 


5 


9 


12 


5 


7 


12 


3 


9 


11 


5 


6 


7 


3 


4 


7 


4 


3 


7 


1 


6 


5 




4 


5 


1 


4 


4 


3 


1 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


2 


2 




2 


1 


i 


2 


1 


l 


2 




2 


47 


22 


25 



112 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 58 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1951-52, 1952-53, 1953-54 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1951-52 



1952-53 



Total Number of Certificates Issued 

Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II 

Supervisor of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 

Visiting Teacher 

County Librarian 

High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Permits — Foreign Exchange Teachers 

Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 

Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Nondegree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Nondegree 



2,549 



11 

371 
306 
85 
78 
42 
3 



31 
494 

32 
28 
22 
19 



239 
426 



220 
51 



12 



2,882 



12 
370 
252 

54 
101 

49 



24 

577 
43 
28 
5 
25 



322 
592 



14 

276 



Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



c t* 



c « 



O ~T \ft o o 

c — o o o 



O CMOOO 

o — o o d 



o o ~o o 
ooood 



*s d d cm . 



oo«roo OOOOM 
do— od oodob 



OrtMOStD o o o o «o 
o cm T cm d ooooo 



ooooo oooo — 
ooood ddood 



MtOtDMOl 



cc ifl x o> « oioteoiw 

<M — — <M 



Oi d O CD lO OOMO00 



-f ioc cm ~ t-axro 
' t~- o a* ooo-f 



— (M — — — I 



OOOOO C-5 o o 

ctoiooo o o d 



— o eo o o r- o ( 
oomoo d c i 



ooooo ooo 
ooood ooo 



d^Moa o ce oo 

-r — 00 00 »0 U5t»iO 
cm cm cx — • c-i — — 



O u"5 O OlOiO 



ONONf » — 00 



- N CI N CO 
-T 00 CO OC OC 



lO C-3 -T CM CO 03 . 



its 
'3 8 



O 6C 



cc re cm — 



• P5 — fC 



cm — — c~r cocoes a> — — • — 



CO C. O - O "5 MN- lC CCJ — — CM »0 MN' 

to — « co ro «- »- — co — »o io — — 

C; — — CM CM 



ft* 

>» 
s 

3 

o 

w 

-o 
c 



CM T — tO 



' f~ CO CM CM CCNi«0>» 



re CO — CM . ~o — -TO co < 



oitoo^f cr. ac r~- 

"cr CO «<5 »C OO — U0 



3 £ 

Kill 



s*2 -2 



P 11 c V ^ 



5) O (J J -u 



'M III 
:g| 1.11 



o e 



oil 



• - o 
a> J £ 
-a » a 
£ £PC 

§ a 

- o-; 

1 11 

* Jl 

« .5<5 

■s I-s.s 

"13 « 2 
o.o § g 

• O lo 

-2 !* 3 3 

' 6 S S 



« o 



E S « 



— tZ t_ 



5 s-o 



g o 4> 

5ȣ 



S s * E 

-fiJi.fi g 

s 2 



s s g 



=1^ 



c CO 
» « ° e b a 

35111 r 

a O « CJ t> 
= ^c| = =J 



114 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 





CC . 






MS — OO 


o o o o o 


O © © © — > 


(0 © CO © © 


I^C © 




s x s 
^ ?? 




© 


o o o o o 


o © o o o 


© © © © © 


— © «c © © 


© © © 


o 




















< 






£| 


CO 


t~ co — o o 


© © to © © 


O lO N O N 


© — CO -« © 


© © — 


a 

1 




3 


© 


o o o o o 


©©*-©© 


© © — © © 


© T CM CM © 


© © CO 






1 


1' 




scnoo 


CO © © © © 




CI © © © © 


t^O© 


3 Tea 


"H 

-a 

« 






o — © o o 


© © © © — 


© © — cm © 


© © © © © 


© © © 


PAL8 ANI 


Sub-stai 


>, 

& 


O bt 




r» — o o 


- - M M 


CO © CM 00 CM 
— © — f© 


— © co © © 
IM © CM © CM 


"J" © CO 

-<o — 


o 






bo 


- 




© CO CO co 


no © © or co 


CI 1- O M O) 


t»© — 


1 
h 




e 
w 


s 

Q 




CO CM 


© CO © © CO 


c-t — 




T CM 


O 
g 




O W) 




stereo 


© cm © — 


co r- uo © © 


—"-©CO© 


s © ao 


H 

o 

H 


3 




cm — d co d 


© ~ CO © — 


d co © © 


— CM © "»> CM 


OON 


W 






bB 


CO 




CM CO CO "f CM 




OO — U0 CO — 


oo <— -r 






Q 


"5 

00 


ao © co t~- 


ac ao ac o5oc 


© oo <>> oo © 

© 00 t>- 00 00 


CM 

t~ CD t>. OJ 


— co 



O -*-» CO 

O 3 



CO CM CO (M 



55 Q 



(00 • • CM CM CM ' 



i »- CO ■ — 



s 



— — 110 © — 



' CO — CT> CM CM CM © 



•*r ao ■*> co — 



- CM CM CM — CO 



CM — ' CM >C 



CO its OS t~- CO •— ' "T © © CO CM CO rj" © © — CCN t- ( 

S NOV-M 00 CO CM CO CO S f CM O0 — (M — CM CO 00( 

OS — — < CO CM CM « 



l« UJt^N - »0 © © CO 00 CM T CO CM »-< CO — CM CM 00 «T • 



cm cocoae©c© co©cmuo — i^cmiocmco °2°22°.t2'T! ceoj 
cm © © t^uoo5"rjo -<r co »o °° © © 



bC CD 
« C 

S3 C 



5 <u~ o_; 

■C > © f ^ 

moo o 



CD O cd 



2 g « 



g'S^sg sJisgo ■SS^f 

OEXttS C^Q^cS! 



.5 o 
to c 

•5 1 



ct.X O 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



'8 
c 

£ 



O 

U 
-a 
c 



SS 2 
11 

a" 



— ooooo oooco© 
o ooooo oo^oo 



oooo ooooo ooo 
oooo ooooo ooo 



Cg O^egOO ooooo 
—i OHHOO OOOOU2 



•OOOO OfflNOM t-OO 
'OOO-* OWfOM COOCC 



eg oieiCHo OHt-oo 

CO OOJN^O O^NOO 



o»ooo toont» eo ^* ■ 



ICOOSCft WMONO 



OWOOO (N Ol t- iO OWN 



C~Cg<CO<-i ^tOWWO 'OMmfi f NWOO OHt> 



►2r ^ 



T3 C 



-H-eo oo ■ • eg -hm 



■CC-H.-tCO Cg CCi-1 ■ NWM 



i«NHH -eci 



_ -r c~ i-i <o »-i eo sceo 



<ji eomosc^eo lc -rt o -coirteooo t m oo eocoeg 
eg ic eg th eoeg—i • hhm cc-n~icg^ 



i«-iu5 egeg • eg <ceg 



= c ca 



"a a a a; .c o 2 
OO OOOQC* 



<U O a 



III 

'CS • ~a rt •- ° 



116 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



omcuoo 

© — -<©© 



ooecoo 

OOMOO 



ooo© ooooo 
oooo —oooo 



is 



© ©•»* © © 
© © — © © 



OOOOO 

ooooo 



oooo 
oooo 



ooooo 
-■oooo 



ooo 
ooo 



10 o m o o o 
o ©•-«©©© 



ooecoo 

OOMOO 



OOON 
OOOM 



ooooo 
ooooo 



ooo 
ooo 



OC U3 m t£) 



CM tO lO U5 lO 
<Ot^O«CC7> 



o o — 
oot- 



eo omooo ooooo 
O OrHOOO ooooo 



oooo ooecoo ooo 
oooo oomoo ooo 



o era ct> ec a> oooomo 



I -"J- fr4 iO IG O O < 



~* z. z. c 



it 

GQ'-S 



CC -"J" LO — «> »-< CM . o]t-i*H CC » CC M N 



5? 



1 — • .-I N 



— 00 COCM 



hnnic ejieccM ec — 



x ec — <o ec t- rncn«(D a o»t- — c- o ec cm lo lo ec 

CT> NWH CM — I — — •— ' CM «-> — rH 

CM 



•s hil 

a — c « « 



III 



Sc iu fi £ •*-> 



Is* 



=3 1=111 Hl^f Ipp l§g 

6 SSiii hi 



Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



Less than 
2 Years College 


Per 

Cent 


•H OOt-OO ooooo oooo ooooo ooo 
o ooooo ooooo oooo ooooo ooo 


Num- 
ber 


- : : ; : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 


Sa- 
ls 

CM 


Per 

Cent 


CO CM CT3 t~ IT CO OO-^MCC ■ — CO C» O — 05 CO CO CO OOOOO 

O OOOOBN lO — CO OO — tOtOO XK5IOMO O — 05 
— — ~- _ es» •— —• CO CM — CM ~ 


Num- 
ber 


CD CM C~ — • CM — • CO -T CO CO CO >*ClNO 00 CM — CM lO CO CO CO 
T CM ■ — > — i — 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 

Cent 


71.7 

36. 4 
63.7 
75.6 
86.2 
80.5 

84.2 
57.9 
75.8 
67.8 
72.2 

76.3 
67 6 

63.0 

67.1 
85.3 
65.1 
95.1 
80 9 

53.3 
70 6 
75.4 


Num- 
ber 


T ■WCMiOOOl CO — WOO* CROSCOCO Oi 05 00 CO CO CO CO CO 
O O lO CM — — t - CO CM • CM CM CM CO -f M CI lO M f 


Master's 
Degreet 


Per 

Cent 


o •«*< tt O •*> c- oo — osus ■ujTfico aocococeto r>-cooo 
t» woinoio o — »-c~c» vcecooo v«o>r-M <CNf 

— rj« — CM — — CM — — — t-HCMCM CM CM — • — • 


Num- 
ber 


co «s — tococo • ^ — on cm r- o> cc ioco*r — f no 
to COCO — — CM to — « 
CM ■*- 



CO OS CO CO 



OS CO CO CO CO r-fOOCMtO 
O CM CO —i CM — — — — — 



i i-i — O O CM O lO 
— O CM 



P- 1 rr3 



5 U 

13 



CO ^_ 

V cp 

| £ 

a. 



• CM CO t- lO CM O COlOCO- 



lO CM T -W — t~ CO 



CM CO O O CO 



MN*00 



•«J> C~ CO CM 
tO — O to -« 



•>* a> o to d 



• CM CM CM CM CM — CM CM — 



CM — CO O 
QO to CO t-~ CO 



•f CO CO 

CO CM O 
CM — CM —CMCO 



CO CO CM — CM 



>o — O03 



(N X (N N N iflMQCifl 



CM — CM — 



— to iO 

CM — CO 
CO — i 



i CO CM 



O — CdtOC 
— < CO CM r^. ! 



00 CO I CO •«»< c~ 



CM GO CM O CO 
OS CO 00 ^ CO 



O CO CM 
CO to CO 



lO — CM CM O 



r~- — — co 



C J 



CO 00 00 CM 
OM-O-H 



OS CO CM O lO 
O CM CM — • CM 



t>. CM 'J" 00 'S" 



OCSOOlflN 
— — CM CM O 



— d — 



C5NU5NO 



co to co — — to cm T — • f ^ 



t to o o h- fr-f ciio f ffoc: r- co c- cc to t— co 



co cm co •«»< 
-r ac co cm -r 

— CM 



TCOCOlOO CM CO CO — NffitOVOO 

CO OS CO CO OS lO O CM — — — CO OS CO C~ 
t>- »o CO CO lO CO f - CO CO CO CO »o to t>- CO 



CCOSC-lOCO lOCMOSCOOO 

-rtotococo — co cm c~ o 

CM — — — CM — CM — OS 



l CO — 



SO 



O 00 CM CO CO 
CM CO CO CO 



NPSO 

d co — o oc 



lOCSOlNlO 
X00 0CNK 



O lO tO CO CO 



■ a m . ■ 
c J o J g 

S3 C cs oS c3 

<<CQOO 



: £ 



c, 



■ 1« jg'S'2 ' 

f-3 F ^ 3 c 

UQOQi: CBB«S 



ssN ill 



.S o 



26 
8 



< 

4)- £ 



< a c ^. 



ooooo 
ooooo' 



g o 



c'co'ci 



O rlD co — ' 



Si 



>> ■ 

•i-Sf s| 

«3 rfa iS fi +i 



118 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



is- 



— OOCOOO ooooo 
d do-iod odood 



i to ic co t co — >o 



— CO CM 



■oooo ooooo ooo 
oooo ooooo ooo 



• o «rt oo co i-oon t-f o «o cm 
O O — T T — — cc »c oooo 



•CI (MOO IMONf 



r» cn r» C4 i-f t>i-o oocot ci cm co co co ONt- 
c© t »o «n oo <CTriN<oio mocio coooocco'-r occm 

— COOOOCOO (OTI^fDOfi CII»XI- COOd/SCOO iO (- t - 



cm oeiotoa cnn>-o 
o oo-ioouj o — co cm d 



0*00100 -rOOOO OPS' 
USOifif CMOOOO G t- ' 



OO CO O I 



r~ lO — ' CM CO OfOOt^OO O O T CO T o o o c© oo ooo< 

o irtcococd cm i« id cm *r co cm cm cm cm ncujio- — o . 



J* « 



r- o cm cc s a o « ■ 



>o — CM 



oi oaf tc< 



t~ ro co r~ *o lOO^iOte cc » t « a t ; 



OOlPStf cc 
O O CO — CO 
CM CM CO 



CO T 00 r~ — (CCCOC »ON 

ci -r — co co — cm co oi cc cm 

— I<5 T — 



)f~ O CT. O CO CM IO 

i ad pst^Ni-d 



ICO •J'lOMMO) t^.O>U3 
'CO d CO CO CO — CO iO CO 



CO OS KJ CO > 



OOOOO 

© o e © d 



T CO ift © Ifl CO 00 — CM CJ: CM OXONN NOCC' 
CM ©TOO— CM — »« CO — T CO — CM — CM -©COCO' 



S3 ji; 



£2 



CM CM CO CM — < < 
T CM CO 



CO T CM OO CO TCI— C 



— oc co t- oo «o < 



i © © U5 KOOiOO IO 0C CM 



CO CO — CM O T CO 



O CO — l~- CO O --NlOOl l/i Oi CO CO OJ t cm to if5 us CO OS CM 

' b-i CO CM CM CM 



: t> © T T OICNIOO! TTCJIOTON — CM T CO i 



CO CO OS — CO 1^. CM O — CM t— O CO CM 00 T T CO "5 CO IO 

© 00 Ci OS — WNlOOKS 00 CO 00 IQ CO — T CM CM — O CO T 



cm t r- co ■ 



: O t~ — 



>COT ©COCMCM< 



s ll-lll 1MI1I MM ^I^p 111 

1 5&3<3 jj&l hi 



2^1 



f 8$ 



Hi 



•3W i— 

> u 



o 5 g 

t. H OJ 



'-©CO I 

;d-ed ^ 



CM CSOO — ©T 

d d d © o cm 



; — — 00 CM O 



JOB 



«1 O S - 



Maryland State Department of Education 



■So 
8 E 



J J' 
To 



CD 



^6 



^o 



2 E 



e ooooc ooooo 
© ooooo ooooo 



CM ©— OOO ©COCO© 
l-J OtCOO© ooo'-ro 



r~ © — os © t^. oo**M 

O N f t» M O © OS OS 



to CC T 00 I ^ 



■oooo ooooo ooo 
'©©'©©' ooooo ooo 



• © © © cm oomooo ooo 
eeeN oo«oo»r ooo 



cnom cm *r i - oo cm tot^o 
cm eg eo ce to ioc^ 

O r- i~ 



— -r o «c O 1 



i O CO O O U5 — I 



■0«)-<iO X«CNO 



1C M - ® ?5 IC 

1~ <N <M 



•coosor- '-ioooo 



J 8 



-f l>«nOO OOOOO OCfJON ©coto — © t^© — 
O OOOOO ©©'—© — © ©' — © O OfMMO O O CO 



t— 00-<il!i0 lONNOO NOUSOO 00 — © CO © —WOO 
— CO CO — CO — O — > CO © — «M»00 >i N N t CI CM — t-» 



OS OS Cs 00 — 



N"COM<t — CM r- O © O) lO lO tC ifl 1ONO100CJ "5 (C (- 



O ®<CNNI 



1 1-» t^- oo r~ x«»ni 



r~ — — uo 



cm ifl oo to — co tc co cc i 



HO)«f OO-h OS CO CO lO lO oocoo 

NOinujio — cm — 

CO CM — • CM CM fCCN 



i — « 00 CO r»00«5O- 
I — lO -4— — CM — > 



o to CM CO r» CM T 



^3 



*r NW-OO ooooo o to O O CM © — oocoo non 
o ooooo oooo— ©'©' — © O O CO — — • © O O CM 



to O to O OS CM COiOaOO COr-OOCM tc«5iOU3CO © — -r 
— COCO'-'-'-" O —> — • •— — — — (MOO — — CO CM CM CM — "5 



11 



1 CM CM — CM — CO CO • — O — CM CM CM 



33 



CM OO CM OS — 

oo o is o co -r 
to to to to t» 



oscocor^o coocoioto cm i> cm o to -r co to 

CI Ol » t O) OS t~~ <3: iti <C 1C N O >COO 
CCt^NKtO GO CO to to >0 CNNNt- «0 to tC 



o eo OS — CO to -r co co co os f O — CO i^Cf D( 
oc co «o -r © »r cs cc cc »r oiCntm cm t -r © i 



OO lO OS <M CM t-» IO CM OS CO O 

' tO 00 -r OS 



r^oouo— ■ — "^lot-to ostoao 



II 



a s s s ;j ta 
<<S0O'O OS 



3S S 



-Co o O e« 



3 £ 

11 



120 



Eighty- 



-Eighth Annual Report 



jaqiouy jajsuBJj, 



^umou^uq puB Jaq^o 



jooqas Jauiuins 



a*bmv paAOj^ 



PO8B303Q 



saoiiisoj paqeijoqv 



UuiqoBaj, 
UBqi Jaq'^O >IJ<>AA 



Xauapiyauj 



a2»noo sjaqoBaj, a^s 
ui auiqaBaj, jo 'a\io61a 
-jad'ns 'aApBJisiuitupv 



ssauni 



X , )J3 ajoiuti|Bg jo 
jooqas a^BAUj jo ews 
jaq^ouy u; SuiqoBaj, 



ajmpsqns 
SB Xjuq paXojduig 



^uacuajpa^j 



XiuB'janjo^ pau2;Ba^j 



X-jtuja^Bj^ 



a38UJBj^ 



*aouasqy jo aABaq 



aaiAjas ^uamiuaAO*) 



sau^enpuj asuajaQ 



aoiAjag A\iB^qij^ 



iWHtcisicxeO' 



oneanooooNNN 



oio^wonooceocjio 



7 1 ' - > -74 



eocst-tet-eoiereoiec 



k©«o>os«o<ooow© 



Tftf3<OC~OC0J©<-i<>je<3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



121 



X}un<>3 
jeq^ouy Jajsusjj, 



4.UAvou^ufi pus JaqiO 



pua^ny °1 jo 
a^Boypj33 apKJQ A\oq 



P3SB903Q 



suopiBoj paqsqoqy 



■fouaptyauj 



a3ailo3 sjaqasaj, 9}*IS 
in SuiqaBaj, jo 'Ajosia 
-jad'ns 'aAi^Bj^stuiiiipv 



ssauju 



XiiQ ajouipisg jo 
jooqas aiBAUj jo aws 

jaqiouy ui SutqDBaj, 



o^nipsqns 
8B X]uq paXojduia 



^uauiajpajj 



XiUB^unpA pau3isa^j 



33bjjjbj^ 



^aauaeqy jo aAeaq 



aotAjas ^uauiujaAOQ 



sau^snpuj asuajaQ 



aotAjas a\ib}ii!p^ 



pjioj, 



••rcoco.-' «(Nf 



ifliONiO CM CM • CO 



CM CM CM —I -^HCOCOCO 



OtOHNx ■ co •* x 



ll-.-HlOCOKiCMWt^J' 



CM -»J"C CO "f"}' «C CM CO 



eoxd-«J't>CM'-"i0s< 



CO »h .-I CO »H • CM • 



TfiUO«Dt>OOCnO»-<CMCO 



OCMCOeO^U3«C<-it-t- 



~h CO CM —i t- 



— *r y-> lO Tf CM CM <£> 



CM CM —> CM ' 



ICJCO^-ICMCOCMOCM 



•CM^HCM "3 



t-c»^HCOi-i<oo>'«j , cM i f 



CM CO 'HH. 



rrt^t-lrHCO'-ICMiftf-iCM 



T^^>^-'J'eO^»H -CM 



cot»-icoeococoio-«»© 



<-o «c <£> c» <-> r- m 



TfW<£>t-OCC»©.-iCMCO 



SI 



II 



|J\5 

~ 3 C 

a 



122 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 68 

Number and Per Cent of New Teachers: Maryland County Schools: 1945-1954 





New to Counties 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 


Number New to County Who Were 












Experienced 


Year 


Number 


Per Cent 


Teaching 
Positions 
October 
to 

October 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 

and 
Unknown 
* 


But 
New 

to 
State 


In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
An- 
other 
Countyt 



WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1944-45 


553 


20.1 


+ 67 


176 


88 


190 


99 


46 


1945-46 


621 


22.7 


—52 


159 


85 


219 


157 


a50 


1946-47 


712 


25.3 


+ 79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


a50 


1947-48 


586 


19.6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


d59 


1948-49 


646 


20.5 


+ 148 


151 


26 


309 


157 


c59 


1949-50 


692 


20.3 


+ 264 


264 


21 


267 


136 


d43 


1950-51 


831 


22.7 


+ 250 


350 


15 


303 


157 


f58 


1951-52 


1,068 


25.8 


+ 478 


447 


10 


399 


206 


f95 


1952-53 


1,148 


25.1 


+ 437 


509 


2 


463 


163 


gioo 


1953-54 


1,491 


29.3 


+ 522 


614 


32 


549 


283 


h95 



WHITE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1944-45 


525 


29.0 


+ 16 


178 


71 


210 


66 


46 


1945-46 


779 


37.0 


+ 286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


1946-47 


763 


33.4 


+ 193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


c57 


1947-48 


675 


26.7 


+239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


b38 


1948-49 


605 


22.4 


+ 168 


281 


25 


239 


58 


b57 


1949-50 


722 


24.6 


+242 


431 


7 


207 


76 


a52 


1950-51 


912 


27.4 


+ 394 


603 


17 


223 


68 


a53 


1951-52 


943 


26.0 


+289 


545 


1 


312 


79 


fl04 


1952-53 


907 


23.7 


+200 


513 


3 


295 


91 


el04 


1953-54 


980 


24.0 


+260 


508 


10 


322 


137 


c98 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1944-45 


132 


22 


3 


+ 14 


84 


17 


16 


15 


21 


1945-46 


108 


18 


2 


—10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


1946-47 


104 


17 





+ 18 


45 


8 


19 


32 


6 


1947-48 


71 


11 


7 


—5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


1948-49 


97 


15 


1 


+35 


63 


4 


12 


27 


a9 


1949-50 


71 


10 


9 


+ 11 


38 




11 


22 


4 


1950-51 


76 


11 


5 


+ 8 


39 


5 


14 


18 


6 


1951-52 


94 


13 


.6 


+32 


52 


3 


18 


21 


11 


1952-53 


84 


11 


5 


+27 


53 




20 


10 


all 


1953-54 


103 


13 


.4 


+46 


56 




18 


29 


9 



COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1944-45 


90 


43.1 


+ 7 


49 


9 


28 


4 


11 


1945-46 


96 


37.0 


+43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


al2 


1946-47 


104 


35.3 


+35 


64 


1 


23 


16 


3 


1947-48 


110 


32.3 


+ 46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


1948-49 


98 


26.0 


+36 


56 


2 


26 


14 


5 


1949-50 


102 


24.2 


+ 44 


68 


1 


24 


9 


6 


1950-51 


153 


29.8 


+ 93 


93 




42 


18 


10 


1951-52 


139 


24.5 


+ 53 


91 




37 


11 


11 


1952-53 


111 


18.5 


+33 


72 


i 


30 


7 


all 


1953-54 


138 


21.4 


+46 


69 


2 


46 


20 


alO 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established 
t Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

Transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent as follows: a-1; b-2 
©-3;d-4;e-5;f-6;g-ll;h-13. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



TABLE 69 

Number and Per Cent of Teachers New to Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland 

During the School Year 1953-54 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 










o 1 








Experienced 












iber 
ions- 
aber 






But New 


to State 


o c 




■M- 
>» 


County 


Num- 


Per 


Bfi 


Un- 


Inex- 


Public Schoolsf 




r? 


c 




ber 


Cent 




known* 


peri- 








u 


1 










ige in 
hing I 
ber to 




enced 


From 


From 


ier Co 
hers E 
hing ii 
n 195 


t 


ner Kj> 
















Mary- 


Other 




82 












uhC 






land 


States 


5 S S S 






Total State 


3 264 


21 


4 


+ 1039 


44 


1 579 


370 


698 


573 


17 


231 


Baltimore City .... 


605 


12 


9 


+ 165 




332 


19 


114 


104 




36 


Total Counties .... 


2 712 


25 


6 


+874 


44 


1,247 


351 


584 


469 


17 


196 




93 


15 


4 


+ 14 




52 


6 


6 


24 




6 


Anne Arundel . . . 


294 


33 


6 


+ 103 


2 


120 


13 


91 


48 


8 


17 




623 


27 


8 


+238 


3 


254 


49 


87 


76 


18 


42 


Calvert 


35 


29 


7 


+7 




17 




9 


4 




4 




38 


23 


5 


+10 




8 


8 


8 


11 




3 


Carroll 


85 


25 


1 


+19 




54 


1 


8 


15 




7 


Cecil 


76 


28 


3 


+18 




24 


4 


25 


16 




8 


Charles 


38 


16 


5 


+8 




13 


4 


10 


6 




5 


Dorchester 


27 


13 


3 


+5 


i 


13 




1 


9 




3 


Frederick 


68 


17 


2 


+ 11 


1 


35 


5 


5 


17 




5 


Garrett 


35 


19 


9 


—4 




12 


4 


9 


7 




3 




123 


30 


6 


+29 




68 


10 


31 


9 




6 




53 


25 


6 


+8 


i 


18 


4 


12 


15 




3 


Kent 


26 


21 


8 


+6 




11 


2 


8 


6 






Montgomery .... 


511 


34 


4 


+ 156 


16 


184 


102 


106 


76 


i 


27 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne s . . . 


509 


33 


3 


+ 159 


15 


222 


100 


94 


48 




30 


43 


33 


6 


+7 


1 


25 


2 


6 


7 




2 


St. Mary's 


51 


36 


2 


+12 


3 


20 


7 


13 


4 




4 


Somerset 


42 


26 


1 


+8 


1 


18 


5 


6 


4 




8 


Talbot 


32 


21 


1 


+7 




7 


5 


7 


10 




3 


Washington 


97 


16 


6 


+14 




35 


12 


24 


21 




5 


Wicomico 


58 


22 


8 


+24 




21 


4 


7 


24 




2 


Worcester 


60 


27 


5 


+15 




16 


4 


11 


16 




3 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from the total and percentage for counties as a group, but 
transfers from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from 
total and percentage for total State. 



124 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 70 

Number and Per Cent of White Elementary School Teachers New to Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1953-54 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 










"o 1 








Experienced 




County 


Num 
bor " 


Per 
Cent 


u * 4* 

ill 
5 "So 


Un- 


Inex- 


But New to State 
Public Schoolst 


nty 
it Not 
Coun- 
-53 




>> 

c 

3 












known* 


peri- 










O 














enced 










fj 
















From 


From 


i_ a C 




u 

O 
C JS 










§ £2 






Mary- 


Other 


poo"" 




£ « 










— i 
OHO 






land 


States 


o oj a> $ 


2« 
Ct.CS 


u a 
j- < 


Total State 


1 778 


26 


o 


+ 554 


32 


804 


242 


380 


320 


13 


97 


Baltimore City: 


315 


18 


1 


+32 




190 


13 


60 


37 




15 


Total Counties ... 


1,491 


29 


3 


+ 522 


32 


614 


229 


320 


283 


13 


82 


Allegany 


50 


16 


8 


+ 17 




30 


1 


3 


12 




4 


Anne Arundel . . . 


166 


39 


6 


_L CO 

T 


1 


70 


11 


48 


29 


i 


6 


Baltimore 


314 


31 


5 


+ 147 


1 


139 


34 


59 


51 


11 


19 


Calvert 


9 


29 










4 


1 


2 


1 




1 


Caroline 


9 


15 





+ 3 




1 


3 




5 






Carroll 


37 


24 


2 


+ 8 




21 




1 


12 




3 


Cecil 


43 


33 


3 


+ 13 




9 


4 


14 


12 




4 


Charles 


10 


14 


5 


+4 




3 


1 


2 


2 




2 


Dorchester 


5 


6 


9 


—1 




3 






1 




1 


Frederick 


25 


14 


9 


—3 


i 


8 


2 


3 


9 




2 


Garrett 


15 


15 


1 


—1 




2 


4 


3 


5 




1 


Harford 


70 


34 


1 


+20 




36 


9 


17 


6 




2 


Howard 


23 


27 


4 


+ 5 




6 


3 


5 


9 






Kent 


4 


9 


.3 


+3 




2 






2 






Montgomery .... 


351 


42 


2 


+ 106 


12 


123 


74 


75 


53 


i 


i3 


Prince George's. . 


303 


39 


9 


+ 101 


15 


112 


67 


65 


30 




14 


Queen Anne's . . . 


7 


15 


2 


+3 




4 


1 


1 


1 






St. Mary's 


26 


43 


3 


+ 13 


2 


9 


4 


4 


3 




4 


Somerset 


10 


18 


9 


+3 




4 


1 


2 


1 




2 


Talbot 


8 


14 


8 


+4 








1 


4 




2 


Washington 


41 


14 


2 


+ 6 




14 


5 


10 


12 






Wicomico 


35 


29 


7 


+ 12 




12 


3 


2 


17 






Worcester 


12 


21 


1 


—3 




1 




3 


6 







* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers 
from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total and 
percentage for total State. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



TABLE 71 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers 
New to Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During School Year 1953-54 



County 



New to County 



Num- 
ber 



Per 
Cent 



11*. 
* * s 

ill 

|1o 

C y © 



Number New to County Who Were 



Un- 
known* 



Inex- 
peri- 
enced 



Experienced 



But New to State 
Public Schoolsf 



From 
Mary- 
land 



Total State 


1,102 


20.2 


+296 


10 


568 


103 


252 


169 


3 


105 


Baltimore City: 






















Junior High 


72 


11.3 


+ 8 




42 


2 


10 


14 




4 


Senior High 


40 


6.9 


+ 12 




8 


1 


14 


13 




4 


Vocational 


23 


16.2 


+ 16 




10 


1 


5 


5 




2 


Total Counties 


980 


24.0 


+260 


10 


508 


99 


223 


137 


3 


95 


Allegany 


43 


14.5 


—3 




22 


4 


3 


12 




2 


Anne Arundel . . . 


104 


35.1 


+30 


i 


42 


2 


87 


12 


2 


8 


Baltimore 


191 


26.2 


+ 82 


2 


106 


14 


27 


20 


1 


21 


Calvert 


12 


41 .4 


+ 1 




7 




3 


1 




1 


Caroline 


22 


33.3 


+4 




6 


2 


8 


3 




3 


Carroll 


45 


27.1 


+9 




31 


1 


7 


2 




4 


Cecil 


32 


26.7 


+ 5 




15 




10 


3 




4 


Charles 


14 


22.6 






3 




7 


2 




2 


Dorchester 


14 


18.7 


+4 




4 




1 


7 




2 


Frederick 


34 


17.8 


+9 




20 


3 


2 


7 




2 


Garrett 


20 


26.0 


—3 




10 




6 


2 




2 


Harford 


48 


31.6 


+8 




31 




12 


3 




2 


Howard 


26 


30.6 


+3 


i 


9 




7 


5 




3 


Kent 


10 


23.8 


+ 1 




3 


1 


4 


2 






Montgomery 


141 


25.5 


+ 48 


3 


54 


25 


30 


17 




12 


Prince George's. . 


159 


29.0 


+38 




83 


29 


23 


11 




13 


Queen Anne's . . . 


27 


56.3 


+2 


1 


16 


1 


3 


4 




2 


St. Mary's 


21 


55.3 


—2 


1 


9 


3 


7 


1 






Somerset 


11 


23.4 





1 


2 


2 


1 


1 




4 


Talbot 


13 


25.5 


+2 




3 


3 


2 


4 




1 


Washington 


53 


18.9 


+ 7 




20 


6 


14 


8 




5 


Wicomico 


15 


22.1 


+ 7 




6 




4 


5 






Worcester 


20 


31.3 


+ 9 




6 


2 


6 


5 




2 



From 
Other 
States 



° « *2 

C f o 
u rt rt 93 
z ~ ~ 



a! 

8*3 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Includes transfers from private schools. 

% Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers 
from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total and 
percentage for total State. 



126 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 72 



Number and Per Cent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of 
Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1953-54 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 










o | 








Experienced 




County 


Num- 


Per 


1=1 
|.2 c 


Un- 


Inex- 


But New to State 
Public Schoolsf 


o c 

*7 3 

c -Of 


>> 


•♦- 
>> 

ft 

c 




ber 


Cent 


OO 


known* 


peri- 










9 










ige in 
hing I 
ber to 




enced 


From 


From 




o 
_ E 


her Ci 
















Mary- 


Other 


tut 
C efl rt n 




I! 










OHO 








States 




2-5 
Cm 




Total State 


183 


10 


2 


+ 84 




104 


7 


23 


49 




13 


Baltimore City ... 


84 


8 




+ 38 




48 




11 


20 




4 


Total Counties .... 


103 


13 


4 


+ 46 




56 


6 


12 


29 




9 


Allegany 


o 

























Anne Arundel . . . 


12 


12 


8 


+ 7 




3 




2 


5 




2 


Baltimore 


5 


6 


4 


+ 3 




3 






1 






Calvert 


9 


25 


7 


+ 5 




4 




2 


2 




i 




2 


11 


8 


+2 




I 






1 






Carroll 


1 


11 


1 













1 






Cecil 




























Charles 


4 


7 


3 







2 






2 








5 


15 


1 


4-1 




4 






1 






Frederick 


6 


30 





+3 




5 






1 






Garrett 


























i 


5 










i 














2 


10 


5 







2 












Kent 


4 


23 


5 


+ 1 




1 




2 


i 






Montgomery .... 


10 


18 


5 







3 


2 




3 




2 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


24 


19 


2 


+ 12 




12 


3 


2 


4 




3 


1 


5 


9 


+2 










1 






St. Mary's 











+ 1 
















Somerset 


7 


23 


3 


+2 




6 












Talbot 


4 


15 


4 







1 




2 


"i 






Washington 


2 


33 


3 







1 






l 






Wicomico 


5 


12 


2 


+ 1 




1 


i 


i 


2 






Worcester 


8 


24 


2 


+ 6 




6 






2 







* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group and from total 

and percentage for total State. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



TABLE 73 



Number and Per Cent of Colored High School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1953-54 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 










o 1 








Experienced 




County 


Num- 
ber 


Per 

Cent 


[umber 
>sitions- 


Un- 


Inex- 


But New to State 
Public Schoolst 


nty 


it Not 
Coun- 
-53 


>> 


«_> 
>> 
c 

3 












known* 


peri- 






■2 




U 


O 














enced 






O 

o 


m tt<* 


E 


O 
















From 


From 




-= J= c 


O 
e S 


a 
p3 










ill 






Mary- 


Other 


E 


o y — 

CS « m 




§1 
















land 


States 


O « « « 


8* 
^ - 


u C 


Total State 


201 


16 


7 


+ 105 


2 


103 


18 


43 




35 


l 


16 


Rnlrimnr** fifv* 


























Junior High 


46 


15 





+21 




27 


1 


8 




5 




6 


Senior High 


4 


2 


7 


+ 12 








3 




1 








21 


20 


4 


+26 




7 




3 




9 




2 


Total Counties 


138 


21 


4 


+46 


2 


69 


17 


29 




20 


1 


9 


Allegany 






























Anne Arundel . . . 


12 


18 


2 


+4 




5 




4 




2 




1 




13 


17 


6 


+6 




6 


i 






3 




2 


Calvert 


5 


21 


7 


+ 1 




2 




2 








1 


Caroline 


5 


26 


3 


+ 1 






3 






2 






Carroll 


2 


20 





+2 




2 














Cecil 


1 


10 














i 










Charles 


10 


22 


7 


+ 5 




5 


3 


1 








i 




3 


13 





+ 1 




2 














Frederick 


3 


18 


7 


+2 




2 












i 


Garrett 


























Harford 


4 


i6 


6 


+i 






i 


2 








i 




2 


10 


5 







i 








i 






Kent 


8 


47 


1 


+1 




5 


i 


*2 










Montgomery .... 


9 


19 


6 


+2 




4 


i 


1 




2 






Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


23 


23 


7 


+ 8 




15 


l 


4 




3 






8 


47 


1 







5 




2 




1 






St. Mary's 


4 


21 


1 







2 




2 










Somerset 


14 


45 


2 


+3 




6 


2 


3 




2 








7 


33 


3 


+ 1 




2 


2 


2 










Washington 


1 


11 


1 


+ 1 






1 












Wicomico 


3 


11 


1 


+4 




2 












l 


Worcester 


10 


35 


7 


+ 3 




3 


i 


3 




3 







* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Includes transfers from private schools. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but 
transfers from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from 
total and percentage for total State. 



128 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 74 



Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* Elementary Schools : 
Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 


Schools for 


White Pupils 


Schools for Colored Pupils 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 




25 


0.5 


562 


0.3 


25 


3.3 


733 


3.1 


Allegany 










1 


19.2 


36 


21.7 


Anne Arundel 


















Baltimore 


















Calvert 










i 


2.8 


30 


2.7 


Caroline 


















Carroll 


















Cecil 


2 


1.5 


57 


1.3 










Charles 


















Dorchester 


5 


6.9 


79 


3.7 


5 


15. i 


142 


12.7 


Frederick 


1 


0.6 


17 


0.3 


3 


15.0 


78 


11.2 


Garrett 


11 


11.1 


257 


9.4 










Harford 


1 


0.5 


25 


0.3 










Howard 


















Kent 










2 


12.6 


53 


10.7 


Montgomery 


















Prince George's 


















Queen Anne's 


i 


2.i 


34 


2.5 


6 


85.3 


207 


39.5 


St. Mary's 










2 


8.3 


78 


9.9 


Somerset 


2 


8.8 


44 


3.1 










Talbot 


1 


1.9 


26 


1.7 


3 


11.8 


66 


8.8 


Washington 


1 


0.3 


23 


0.2 










Wicomico 










2 


5.6 


43 


3.5 


Worcester 



















* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, sir, seven, or eight. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLE 75 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in Maryland County One-Teacher Schools* : 

1923-1954 



County Elementary School Teachers 



Year Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


In One- Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One- Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


3,063 


1,093 


35.7 


712 


403 


56.6 


1928 


3,071 


827 


26.9 


734 


379 


51.7 


1933 


2,948 


406 


13.8 


718 


334 


46.5 


1938 


2,951 


287 


9.7 


• 677 


271 


40.0 


1943 


2,677 


143 


5.3 


593 


132 


22.3 


1945 


3,050 


106 


3.5 


611 


112 


18.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3.2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 


91 


15.0 


1948 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 


1949 


3,170 


73 


2.3 


647 


82 


12.7 


1950 


3,432 


64 


1.9 


655 


63 


9.6 


1951 


3,696 


54 


1.5 


663 


49 


7.4 


1952 


4,164 


40 


1.0 


696 


35 


5.0 


1953 


4,670 


33 


0.7 


731 


26 


3.5 


1954 


5,219 


25 


0.5 


765 


25 


3.3 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 



130 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 76 

Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties : 1923-1954 



Year Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


287 


9 


4 


253 


36 


9 


122 


17 




13 


49 


8 


1928 


204 


6 


6 


333 


34 


3 


68 


9 


3 


25 


47 


9 


1933 


219 


7 


4 


430 


36 


3 


76 


10 


5 


46 


49 


1 


1938 


261 


8 


9 


522 


38 


7 


79 


11 


7 


68 


50 


6 


1943 


139 


5 


2 


538 


29 


7 


58 


9 


7 


81 


42 


.0 


1945 


104 


3 


7 


465 


25 


8 


43 


7 




78 


36 


.8 


1946 


107 


. 3 


9 


629 


29 


4 


45 


7 


5 


88 


33 


.7 


1947 


125 


4 


5 


787 


33 


8 


52 


8 


6 


103 


34 


.4 


1948 


161 


5 


4 


931 


36 


7 


62 


10 


1 


126 


37 


2 


1949 


175 


5 


5 


1,025 


38 


3 


68 


10 


5 


140 


37 


.3 


1950 


243 


7 


1 


1,203 


41 


1 


70 


10 


6 


154 


36 


.6 


1951 


295 


8 





1,454 


44 





73 


11 





205 


40 


.0 


1952 


380 


9 


1 


1,654 


45 


9 


77 


11 


1 


212 


38 


.1 


1953 


460 


9 


9 


1,822 


47 


5 


83 


11 


4 


239 


39 


.7 


1954 


495 


9 


5 


1,956 


47 


8 


82 


10 


7 


268 


41 


.3 



Note: For basic data see TABLE X. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



TABLE 77- 



-Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City- 
Number of Teachers and Principals: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Number 
of 

Teachers 

and 
Principals 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . . 


*574 


76 


27 


35 


49 


6 


9 


16 


18 


6 


17 


27 


29 


19 


9 


8 


1.0- 1.9. .. 


34 












1 


2 


3 




5 


1 


11 


2 






2.0- 2.9. . . 


49 






1 






1 




4 




2 


4 


8 




2 


4 


3.0- 3.9. . . 


34 




2 


2 


i 




1 




1 




4 


2 


1 


*2 






4.0- 4.9. . . 


41 


i 




5 


8 


1 






1 




1 


8 


4 








5.0- 5.9. . . 


26 


i 


1 










i 


1 


i 


1 


2 


1 






1 


6.0- 6.9. . . 


31 




2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


i 




i 








8 


i 




7.0- 7.9. . . 


26 




1 




8 




1 


4 


2 


i 




2 




2 






8.0- 8.9. . . 


24 


i 


7 


2 








1 






1 


1 




1 


i 




9.0- 9.9. . . 


21 






3 








2 




i 




1 






l 




10.0-10.9. . . 


15 


l 


2 


1 






i 




i 
















11.0-11.9... 


22 


4 




1 


























12.0-12.9. . . 


22 


5 




2 




















2 






13.0-13.9. . . 


24 


5 


2 


2 








i 






i 












14.0-14.9. . . 


19 


2 


5 


2 








l 






i 


2 










15.0-15.9. . . 


14 


1 












l 












i 






16.0-16.9. . . 


17 






2 










2 






3 




l 






17.0-17.9. . . 


13 


*2 






























18.0-18.9. . . 


17 


1 




4 










2 
















19.0-19.9. . . 


16 


7 




1 




















i 






20.0-20.9. . . 


10 


4 






























21 .0-21.9. . . 


11 


6 






























22.0-22.9. . . 


11 


2 




1 


























23.0-23.9. . . 


6 
































24.0-24.9. . . 


9 




i 


1 


























25.0-25.9. . . 


4 








2 
























26 .0 and over 


68 


31 


l 


1 


17 










i 








2 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools . . 


221 


50 


1.0- 1.9... 


30 




2.0- 2.9. . . 
3.0- 3.9.. . 


s 


'4 
2 


4.0- 4.9. . . 


12 




5.0- 5.9. . . 


9 




6.0- 6.9. . . 


10 




7.0- 7.9. . . 


4 




8.0- 8.9. . . 


3 


1 


9.0- 9.9.. . 


7 


1 


10.0-10.9. . . 


5 




11.0-11.9. . . 


5 


2 


12.0-12.9. . . 


8 


5 


13.0-13.9. . . 


4 


4 


14.0-14.9. . . 


5 




15.0-15.9. . . 


3 


2 


16.0-16.9. . . 


2 


1 


19.0-19.9... 


1 


1 


20.0-20.9.. . 


6 


4 


22.0-22.9.. . 


2 


2 


23.0-23.9.. . 


2 


2 


24.0-24.9. . . 


1 


1 


25.0-25 .9. . . 


3 


3 


26 .0 and over 


16 


15 



2 8 



19 8 7 



* Includes a total of twelve seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high 
school curriculum: one each in Carroll and Frederick, two in Allegany, eight in Baltimore, 
t Includes two schools having a graded organization. 



132 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 78 



Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City: 
Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Average 
Number 
Belonging 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools. . 

30 or less . . . 

31- 60 

61- 90 

91-120 

121-150 

151-180 

181-210 

211-240 

241-270 

271-300 

301-330 

331-360 

361-390 

391-420 

421-450 

451-480 

481-510 

511-540 

541-570 

571-600 

601-660 

661-720 

721-780 

781-840 

841-900 

901-960 

961-1020 

1021-1080. . . 
1081-1140. . . 
1141-1200. . . 
1201 and over 



574 

27 
45 
31 
22 
41 
23 
29 
23 
26 
23 
22 
14 
13 
19 
22 
18 



76 27 35 49 



9 16 18 



6 17 27 



29 19 



8 62 59 11 



9 10 9 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools . . 221 



30 or less . . 

31- 60 

61- 90 

91-120 

121-150 

151-180 

181-210 

211-240 

241-270 

271-300 

301-330 

331-360 

361-390 

391-420 

421-450 

451-480 

481-510 

511-540 

541-570 

571-600 

601-660 

661-720 

721-780 

781-840 

841-900 

901-960 

961-1020. . . . 
1021-1080. . . 
1081-1140. . . 
1141-1200. . . 
1201 and over 



50 



2 20 12 



11 



8 6 8 19 



Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 79 — Number of Maryland Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior and Vocational High Schools 
by County and Baltimore City: Number of Teachers and Principals: 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Number 
of 

Teachers 

and 
Principals 





>. 

o 




"3 


























>» 


n 

*« 

S? 


"<K 








a 




11 Schools 


altimore i 


Allegany 


nne Arun 


altimore 


alvert 


aroline 


arroll 


ecil 


harles 


orchester 


rederick 


arrett 


arford 


oward 


ent 


[ontgome 


rince Geo 


ueen Ann 


:. Mary's 


jmerset 


albot 


Washingto 


Wicomico 


< 


CQ 


< 


pq 


O 


U 


U 


U 


O 


Q 


fa 


O 


P3 


pq 


US 




fa 


C 




W 


H 





WHITE JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . 


*168 


25 


9 


8 


13 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


8 


2 


4 


5 


3 


13 


13 


3 


3 


5 


2 


10 


4 


4 


1.0- 2.9. . . 


2 






































1 


1 










8.0- 4.9. . . 


3 
















2 






























1 




5 0- 6.9... 


9 












1 


1 




3 


2 




















1 




I 






7^0- 8.9. '. '. 


7 


1 


1 
















1 


1 


















1 






2 




9.0-10.9. .. 


11 




2 




1 




1 




2 






1 








2 






1 












i 


11.0-12.9. . . 


5 


i 












3 














1 






















13.0-14.9. .. 


6 


2 


















1 








1 




1 


















15.0-16.9. . . 


11 












1 


1 


1 












1 








1 


1 


1 


1 








17.0-18.9. . . 


8 












2 


2 














1 






















19.0-20.9. . . 


6 






1 








1 






























2 






21.0-22.9. . . 


9 




i 


1 
















1 








1 




1 


1 


1 












23.0-24.9. . . 


8 


i 




















1 




1 








2 










2 






25.0-29.9. . . 


12 


2 


i 






1 








2 


i 






1 


1 






1 










1 






80.0-34.9. . . 


9 






i 


"i 














i 


1 








1 












2 






85.0-39.9. . . 


14 




i 


i 


i 


















1 






4 


3 








1 


1 






40.0-44.9. . . 


8 


1 




2 


3 
















1 










1 
















45.0-49.9. . . 


6 


1 












1 


















2 


1 












1 




50.0-54.9. . . 


5 






2 
















l 










1 


1 
















55.0-59.9. . . 


4 


1 


i 




2 










































60.0-64.9. . . 


5 


1 






2 


























1 










1 






65.0-69.9. . . 


4 


1 






1 


























1 
















70.0-74.9. . . 


2 




l 






























1 
















75.0-79.9. . . 


































1 


















80.0-84.9. . . 




1 
















































85.0-89.9. . . 


5 


3 






1 










































90.0-94.9. . . 


5 


4 






1 








































95.9-99.9. . . 


















































100 and over 


1 


1 















































COLORED JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . 


43 


9 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 




2 


5 


1 


2 


2 


1 




1 




1.0- 2.9. . . 

3.0- 4.9. . . 

5.0- 6.9. . . 

7.0- 8.9. . . 

9.0-10.9. . . 
11.0-12.9. . . 
13.0-14.9. . . 
15.0-16.9. . . 
17.0-18.9. . . 
19.0-20.9. . . 
21.0-22.9. . . 
23.0-24.9. . . 
25.0-29.9. . . 
30.0-34.9. . . 
35.0-39.9. . . 
40.0-44.9. . . 
45.0-49.9. . . 
50.0-54.9. . . 
55.0-59.9. . . 


1 
1 

3 
1 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
5 
2 
4 
4 

j 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 






1 
1 


1 




1 
1 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 




1 
1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 


1 

i 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


65.0-69.9. . . 


1 






1 












































100 and over 


3 


3 

















































* Excludes a total of twelve seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high 
s-chool curriculum: one each in Carroll and Frederick, two in Allegany, eight in Baltimore. 



134 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 80 — Number of Maryland Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
by County and Baltimore City: Average Number Belonging : 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Average 




City 




1 




























00 


_03 

"a 








e 






Number 




« 




ne Arun 


0) 












U 

0) 












£ 
o 

u: 
C 




c 

r- 











i 

o 






Belonging 


Scho( 


Itimor 


>> 

J 


Itimor 


Ivert 


roline 


rroll 


ecil 


1 
e3 


rchest 


»dericl> 


rret I 


rford 


ward 


c 


nee G 


eon Ai 


Mary 


i 

E 


Ihot 


M 

B 

IE 

s 


1 










c 


90 






gd 




o 




« 




o 


4) 


O 




3 















< 


CQ 


< 


< 


PQ 


U 


u 


O 


U 


u 


Q 




C 












a 


03 


X 











WHITE JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . 


168 


25 


9 


8 


13 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


8 


2 


4 


5 


3 


13 


13 


3 


3 


5 


2 


10 


4 


4 


oO or less . . 


3 


















I 
































51- 100. . . 


12 












1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


















1 


1 




1 


1 




101- 150. . . 


7 












1 








1 




















1 






2 




151- 200. . . 


13 




1 












2 






2 






1 


2 




















201- 260. . . 


5 




2 










2 




































251- 300. . . 


9 
















1 




1 


1 














1 






1 






1 


301- 350. . . 


10 












3 


1 






1 








2 












1 








1 


351- 400. . . 


9 






1 








3 








1 


















1 




2 






401- 450. . . 


9 




1 












1 






1 








1 




2 


1 












1 


451- 500. . . 


7 
















1 


1 








1 








1 




1 






2 






501- 600 .. . 


10 










1 








1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 
















601- 700. . . 


5 
















1 




























2 






701- 800. . . 


14 




1 


2 


1 
















1 








4 


2 








1 


1 






801- 900. . . 


9 




1 




2 














1 




1 






1 


1 










1 






901-1000. . . 


7 






i 


2 
















i 








1 


1 
















1001-1100. . . 


4 






1 








1 


















1 


1 
















1101-1200. . . 


3 






2 


























1 


















1201-1300. . . 


4 






















1 












1 












1 




1301-1400. . . 


2 








1 










































1401-1500. . . 


5 




i 




1 




































1 






1501-1600. . . 


3 








1 
























1 


















1601-1700. . . 


4 








2 


















1 








1 
















1701-1800. . . 


2 


































1 
















1801-1900. . . 


2 
































1 


















1901-2000. . . 


4 


















































2001-2100. . . 


1 


















































2101-2200. . . 


3 








1 










































2401 and over 


2 








1 
















■• 



























COLORED JUNIOR, JUNIOR SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . 


43 


9 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 


i 


2 


5 


1 


2 


2 


1 




1 


1 


50 or less . . 


1 














1 




































101- 150. . . 
151- 200. . . 
201- 250. . . 
251- 300. . . 
301- 350. . 
351- 400. . . 
401- 450. . . 
451- 500. . . 
501- 600 . . . 
601- 700. . . 
701- 800. . . 
801- 900. . . 


5 
4 
3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 


1 


1 




1 
1 

1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 




1 
1 


i 


l 


1 
1 


2 
1 

1 


1 


1 
1 

•• 


1 
1 


1 


1 




l 


1001-1100. . . 
1101-1200. . . 


1 
1 


































1 
















1701-1800. . . 


2 






1 












































2501-2600. . . 


1 


















































3001 and over 


2 


2 

















































Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 81 



Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools : Number of Principals and Teachers : 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 













General Supervisors by Type of 




■- 
















School 










Number of 




















Principals 


Total 










Other 


Pupil 


County 


and 




Super- 


Elementary 




Super- 


Personnel 




Teachers 


visors 








High 


visorst 














White 


Colored 








Total State 


15,451.7 


250 


.5 


68 


.0 


18.9 


57.0 


106.6 


109.9 


Baltimore v^ity .... 


4,725.6 


89 


.0 


11 


.0 


6.0 


15.0 


57 .0 


53 .0 


Total Counties .... 


10,726.1 


161 


.5 


57 


.0 


12.9 


42.0 


49 .6 


56.9 


Allegany 


601 


2 


9 


.7 


3 


.0 


X 


2.0 


4.7 


4.0 


Anne Arundel . . . 


882 





11 


.8 


4 


.3 


1.0 


3.0 


3.5 


5.0 


Baltimore 


1,885 


8 


26 


.5 


7 


.3 


1.0 


8.1 


10.1 


10.8 


Calvert 


120 


1 


2 


.0 


1 


.0 


1.0 






1.0 


Caroline 


162 





2 


.4 


1 


.0 


0.4 


1.6 




1 .0 


Carroll 


336 





5 


4 


2 





0.1 


2.0 


1.3 


2.0 


Cecil 


268 


9 


5 





2 





t 


2.0 


1 .0 


1.0 


Charles 


229 





3 





1 





1.0 


1.0 




2.0 


Dorchester 


203 





3 










1.0 


1.0 




1.0 


Frederick 


394 


6 


5 







.7 


0.2 


1.6 


1.5 


0.8 


Garrett 


176 





3 





2 





. ... 


1.0 




1 .0 


Harford 


406 





5 


5 


3 







2.5 




1.0 


Howard 


204 





3 


5 


1 





0.6 


1.4 


0.5 


1.0 


Kent 


118 


4 


2 


5 


1 





0.5 


1.0 




1 .0 


Montgomery. . . . 


1,596 


3 


23 


2 


8 


7 


0.5 


4.0 


io 6 


6.3 


Prince George's . 


1,532 





22 





7 





1.0 


3.0 


11 .0 


8.0 


Queen Anne's. . . 


129 





2 


5 


1 





0.5 


1.0 




1.0 


St. Mary's 


142 


7 


3 


2 


1 





1.0 


1.0 


0.2 


1 .0 




161 





3 





1 





0.6 


1.4 




1 .0 


Talbot 


152 




2 


5 


1 





0.5 


1 .0 




1 .0 


Washington .... 


592 


3 


9 


8 


3 





: 


1 .0 


5.8 


3.0 


Wicomico 


251 


7 


4 





2 





1.0 


1.0 




2.0 


Worcester 


182 





3 










1.0 


1 .0 




... 















* Excludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio- Visual Education, Commercial, Curriculum, Distributive Educa- 
tion, English, Geography, Guidance, Handwriting, Health, History, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion, Instruction, Languages, Libraries, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, Radio and Television, 
Reading, Safety Education, School Lunch. Science, Special Education, Testing, and Vocational Education. 

t Less than 0.1 of supervisor's time. 



L36 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CHART 2 

Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid : Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City : 1928-1954 

75 — _ . . . . 




Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 82 

Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1954 



.School Year 



Current Expenses by Source of Funds 



Total 



State 



Federal 



Local 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



TOTAL STATE 



$12,764,250 
16,147,689 
18,293,874 
20,467,797 
23,546,628 
26,772,479 
28,121,601 
31,068,741 
36,621,996 
51,175,927 
57,567,186 
64,661,563 
71,448,847 
80,931,643 
91,844,287 

100,833,162 



$3,058,180 
3,207,088 
4,616,690 
6,196,636 
6,960,882 
9,350,554 
8,982,115 
10,803,700 
11,594,496 
21,534,379 
22,993,313 
24,640,596 
27,659,372 
30,241,963 
32,458,006 
35,859,919 



$46,966 
69,150 
80,139 
209,722 
245,787 
155,604 
520,720 
434,104 
1,234,736 
1,547,581 
1,235,487 
2,011,407 
2,080,125 
2.380,208 
2,457,252 
2,632,578 



$9,659, 
12,871, 
13,597, 
14,061, 
16,339, 
17,266, 
18,618, 
19,830, 
23,792, 
28 093, 
33,338, 
38,009, 
41,709, 
48,309, 
56,929, 
62,340, 



104 
451 
045 
439 
959 
321 
766 
937 
764 
967 
386 
560 
350 
472 
029 
665 



$789,311 
2,131,699 
3,142,211 
3,739,854 
3,776,207 
4,119,423 
4,063,754 
4,192,979 
3,878,466 
4,506,683 
4,893,175 
6,800,278 
6,133,501 
7,751,625 
9,850,293 
12,023,860 



BALTIMORE CITY 



$6,799,794 
8,360,391 
9,312,282 
10,103,224 
10,620,120 
11,925,742 
12,357,985 
13,048,637 
14,455,866 
20,500,455 
22,625,966 
25,684,535 
27,113,114 
28,683,507 
33,011,067 
34,297,839 



$1,052,845 
999,753 
1,568,928 
1,463,505 
1,495,480 
2,265,683 
1,981,734 
2,176,054 
2,243,349 
4,779,040 
5,016,904 
5,422,725 
6,016,080 
6,060,360 
6,404,596 
7,371,737 



$13,256 
17,240 
11,131 
61,200 
64,355 
45,953 
75,627 
77,328 
175,615 
656,839 
277,450 
717,106 
668,895 
506,334 
339,035 
220,604 



$5,733 
7,343 
7,732 
8,578! 
9,060, 
9,614, 
10,300, 
10,795, 
12,036, 
15,064, 
17,331, 
19,544, 
20,428, 
22,116 
26,267, 
26,705, 



693 
398 
223 
519 
285 
106 
624 
255 
902 
576 
612 
704 
139 
813 
436 



$685,620 
1,580,599 
1,983,157 
2,335,256 
2,105,427 
2,192,721 
2,210,496 
2,349,885 
1,958,255 
2,307,374 
1,628,980 
1,647,487 
1,622,453 
1,754,563 
1,810,740 
2,557,570 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



1923 


$5,964,456 


$2,005,335 


$33,710 


$3,925,411 


$103,691 


$1,475,269 


1928 


7,787,298 


2,207,335 


51,910 


5,528,053 


551,100 


1,532,718 


1933 


8,981,592 


3,047,762 


69,008 


5,864,822 


1,159,054 


688,497 


1938 


10,364,573 


4,733,131 


148,522 


5,482,920 


1,404,598 


1,576,434 


1943 


12,926,508 


5,465,402 


181,432 


7,279,674 


1,670,780 


816,813 


1944 


14,846,737 


7,084,871 


109,651 


7,652,215 


1,926,702 


423,538 


1945 


15,763,616 


7,000,381 


445,093 


8,318,142 


1,853,258 


703,839 


1946 


18,020,104 


8,627,646 


356,776 


9,035,682 


1,843,094 


1,592,508 


1947 


22,166,130 


9,351,147 


1,059,121 


11,755,862 


1,920,211 


3,174,964 


1948 


30,675,472 


16,755,339 


890,742 


13,029,391 


2,199,309 


10,250,500 


1949 


34,941,220 


17,976,409 


958,037 


16,006,774 


3,264,195 


19,514,775 


1950 


38,977,028 


19,217,871 


1,294,301 


18,464,856 


5,152,791 


22,824,717 


1951 


44,335,733 


21,643,292 


1,411,230 


21,281,211 


4,511,048 


24,597,668 


1952 


52,248,136 


24,181,603 


1,873,874 


26,192,659 


5,997,062 


29,909,754 


1953 


58,833,220 


26,053,410 


2,118,217 


30,661,593 


8,039,553 


36,697,256 


1954 


66,535,323 


28,488,182 


2,411,974 


35,635,167 


9,466,290 


38,201,643 



N. B. — This table has been revised to include all funds available in each year. 



138 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CHART 3 

Per Cent of Current Expenditures : Maryland Public Schools 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County- 



Received 
from 



□ 



State, Excluding 
Equalization Fund 

Equalization Fund 

25 



50 



Federal Aid 

County Levy and 
Other County Funds 

75 loo 



Total State 
Baltimore City 
Total Counties 

Charles 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 

Calvert 

Somerset 

Caroline 

Howard 

Kent 

Queen Anne 1 s 
Cecil 

Dorchester 
Talbot 

Anne Arundel 

Harford 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Frederick 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Prince George's 

Baltimore 

Montgomery 







Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 83 

Source of Current Expenses*: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



' OIJNTY 


Total 
Current 
Funds 


Stat*' 


Federal 


Local Levy 
and Other 
Local Sources 


Per 

Equal- 
ization 
Fund 


Cent i 
State 

Other 


ROM E 

Total 


ACH SO 

Fed- 
eral 


URCE 

Local 

and 
Other 
Local 
Sour- 
ces 


Total State 


«1AA QOO 1 RO OO 


*OC QCQ Q1 o no 


*o roo ziin no 


#/?0 QAPl CCK 7Q 

!j>bJ,<i40,boD. to 


JO 


A 
4 


OQ 
-O 


o 


oO 


O 


2 


.6 


61 .8 


Balto. City 


t34,297,839.25 


t7,371,736.98 


220,603.87 


t26,705,498.40 






21 


5 


21 


.5 





6 


77.9 


Total 




























Coun tit's 


+CC ro K QOO Q7 


•fOQ AQQ 1 Q1 7,4 


O A 1 1 Q7Q W ^ 

.£,41 l,y / o.OO 


QC CQC 1 Rn QQ 

oO,ooo,lo t .oo 


18 


8 


24 





42 


8 


3 


.6 


- «> c 

Oo . o 


Allegany . . 


3,535,462.62 


1,818,914.82 


94,048.41 


1,622,499.39 


31 


4 


20 





51 


4 


2 


.7 


45.9 


An. Arundel 


4,804,229.99 


2,419,594.41 


259,497.55 


2,125,138.03 


29 


3 


21 


1 


50 


4 


5 


4 


44.2 


Baltimore . 


ll,04o,Oo4.yo 


1 QQ 1 79C Af\ 

i,yy i, i zd.iu 


1 QO CfiC 77 


Q 97/1 1 OO 1R 
y,0 i 4,1--. ( O 






17 


2 


17 


2 




6 


Q1 O 
til .C 


Calvert .... 


R1 A KAR OA 

i 4,04o.oi 


A 8Q 4ic 71 

4oy,4io. 1 1 


OR AIR en 
£0,4 ( O.OU 


ICQ C /I £Q 

108,004.00 


si 


5 


21 


1 


72 


6 


3 


9 


£o . O 


Caroline. . . 


907,931.42 


602,808.63 


13,882.43 


291,240.36 


46 


4 


20 





66 


4 


1 


5 


32.1 


Carroll. . . . 


1,732,198.94 


913,398.44 


26,478.59 


792,321.91 


31 





21 


7 


52 


7 


1 


5 


45.8 


Cecil 


1,504,114.43 


755,282.78 


127,399.01 


621,432.64 


29 


5 


20 


7 


50 


2 


8 


.5 


41.3 


Charles. . . . 


1,259,756.46 


909,356.55 


148,706.50 


201,693.41 


50 


4 


21 


8 


72 


2 


11 


8 


16.0 


Dorchester. 


1,171,817.88 


656,993.02 


19,114.28 


495,710.58 


35 





21 


1 


56 


1 




fi 


42.3 


Frederick . . 


2,194,670.33 


1,042,515.21 


84,675.08 


1,067,480.04 


26 


3 


21 


2 


47 


5 


3.9 


48.6 


Garrett. . . . 


1,049,487.85 


826,328.99 


17,480.92 


205,677.94 


57 


3 


21 


4 


78 


7 




.7 


19.6 


Harford . . . 


2,365,866.19 


931,091.47 


360,691.41 


1,074,083.31 


19 


6 


19 


8 


39 


4 


15 


2 


45.4 


Howard . . . 


1,091,861.94 


702,690.10 


25,144.93 


364,026.91 


42 


3 


22 


1 


64 


4 


2 


.3 


33.3 


Kent 


699,648.84 


419,851.72 


6,692.50 


273,104.62 


40 


4 


19 


6 


60 





1 


.0 


39.0 


Montgom'y 


9,920,547.92 


1,530,705.09 


331,740.02 


8,058,102.81 






15 


4 


15 


4 


3 


.4 


81.2 


Pr. George's 


8,839,738.86 


3,567,613.19 


428,169.06 


4,843,956.61 


21 


.3 


19 


1 


40 


4 


4 


8 


54.8 


Qu. Anne's. 


758,491.48 


445,042.84 


13,946.03 


299,502.61 


38 


6 


20 


1 


58 


7 


1 


8 


39.5 


St. Mary's . 


836,710.60 


555,223.86 


141,040.95 


140,445.79 


43 


9 


22 


4 


66 


3 


16 


9 


16.8 


Somerset . . 


822,533.18 


614,771.32 


9,183.67 


198,578.19 


50 


.5 


24 


3 


74 


8 


1 




24.1 


Talbot 


831,801.99 


460,299.83 


10,979.07 


360,523.09 


33 


6 


21 


7 


55 


3 


1 


3 


43.4 


Washington 


3,437,268.65 


1,574,941.29 


50,490.83 


1,811,836.53 


26 


3 


19 


5 


45 


8 


1 


.5 


52.7 


Wicomico. . 


1,458,250.37 


669,417.39 


20,509.79 


768,323.19 


25 


3 


20 


6 


45 


9 


1 


4 


52.7 


Worcester . 


1,036,399.76 


536,748.18 


12,939.55 


486,712.03 


29 


8 


22 





51 


8 


1 


.2 


47.0 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1953 and excludes those for the current 
year received after June 30. 1954. 

t Includes funds for teachers in the Employees' Retirement System as follows: State, $2,517,833.72; local, 
$17,353.00;, total, $2,535,186.72. 

% Includes $4,006,814.95 for the Teachers' Retirement System and $46,636.55 for the related expense fund not 
distributed to the counties in these columns. 



140 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CHART 4 

Per Cent Distribution of Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses: 
Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




Maryland Statk Department of Education 141 
TABLE 84 

Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education: 

Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 



Current Expenses 



Adminis- 
tration 



Super- 
vision 



Salaries 
of 

Teachers 
and 
Princi- 
pals 



Books, Ma- 
terials, and 
Other Costs 
of 

Instruction 







Other 


Opera- 


Mainte- 


School 


tion 


nance 


Services 



Fixed 
Charges 
and Pay- 
ments to 
Adjoining 
Units 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


2 


2 


1 


.7 


63 


5 


5 


.4 


7 


7 


4 


1 


8 





t7 


.4 


32 


83 


Baltimore City 


2 


3 


1 


.8 


66 


6 


5 


.5 


8 


1 


3 


9 


4 


1 


t7 


.7 


24 


47 


Total Counties 


2 


1 


1 


.6 


62 





5 


3 


7 


5 


4 


2 


10 





t7 


3 


36 


45 


Allegany 


2 




1 


.6 


66 


4 


4 


4 


8 





4 


4 


11 


9 




2 


20 






o 
£• 


9 


I 


4 


66 


y 


c 
O 


2 










g 


g 


j 


g 


41 


Q5 


Baltimore 


2 


2 


1 


'.7 


66 


5 


8 


4 


6 


8 


5 


5 


7 


8 


1 


1 


45 


60 


Calvert 


2 


9 


1 


.7 


60 


2 


2 


7 


6 





2 


3 


22 


4 


1 


8 


2 


71 


Caroline 


2 





1 


.7 


65 


4 


4 


2 


5 


2 


4 


1 


16 


5 





9 


1 


34 


Carroll 


1 


6 


1 


.9 


69 


1 


4 


4 


6 


4 


2 


2 


12 


9 


1 


5 


14 


11 


Cecil 


2 


1 


2 





66 


1 


4 


6 


8 





3 


9 


11 


9 




4 


36 


1? 


Charles 


2 


4 




4 


64 


1 


3 


7 


9 


4 


2 


5 


15 


6 





9 


29 


32 


Dorchester 




9 


1 


5 


64 





2 


9 


7 


6 


2 


9 


16 


3 


2 


9 


46 


85 


Frederick 


1 


9 


1 


4 


67 





3 


7 


7 


1 


5 


3 


12 


4 


1 


2 


16 


66 


Garrett 


2 


3 


1 


6 


59 


5 


2 


8 


5 


6 


2 


2 


22 


8 


3 


2 


16 


44 


Harford 


2 


5 


1 


3 


63 


4 


4 


8 


8 


9 


3 


7 


14 


6 





8 


48 


67 


Howard 


2 


5 


1 


6 


67 


5 


3 


6 


6 


2 


2 


4 


15 


3 





9 


35 


49 


Kent 


3 





2 


2 


63 


8 


3 


8 


7 


3 


2 


7 


16 


3 





9 


14 


66 


Montgomery 


2 


2 


1 


6 


67 


3 


5 


9 


9 


4 


4 


6 


7 


9 


1 


1 


38 


47 


Prince George's . . 


1 


6 


1 


6 


65 


6 


7 


3 


10 


6 


5 


7 


6 


2 


1 


4 


38 


3,H 


Queen Anne's 


2 


7 


2 





61 


9 


4 


8 


6 


1 


3 


7 


17 


9 





9 


32 


66 


St. Mary's 


2 


4 


2 


3 


55 


5 


4 


4 


8 


6 


6 


3 


19 


8 





7 


37 


41 


Somerset 


2 




2 




67 





3 





6 





3 


9 


14 


4 




5 


25 


51 


Talbot 


2 





1 


8 


66 


1 


3 


4 


8 





3 


8 


13 


5 




4 


43 


27 


Washington 


3 


3 


1 


8 


69 


5 


3 


8 


6 


9 


2 


4 


11 


2 


1 


1 


25 


35 


Wicomico 


2 


4 


1 


6 


64 


3 


5 




5 


2 


4 


2 


15 


3 




9 


62 


48 


Worcester 


2 


5 


1 


6 


61 


2 


4 


1 


6 


8 


4 


6 


17 


5 




7 


45 


25 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


2 


3 




.7 


67 


.0 


5 


.7 


8 


.1 


4.3 


3 


.1 


t7 


.8 


34 


00 


Baltimore City 


2 


4 


1 


.8 


66 


.8 


5 


5 


8 


.1 


3.9 


3 


.8 


n 


.7 


24 


.52 


Total Counties 


2 


3 


1 


.7 


67 


1 


5 


8 


8 


1 


4.5 


2 


.6 


t7 


.9 


38 


31 


Allegany 


2 


2 


1 


.8 


72 


1 


4 


8 


8 


7 


4.8 


4 


3 


i 


.3 


21 


87 


Anne Arundel 


3 


1 




.6 


72 


3 


5 


6 


8 


.3 


4.8 


2 


3 


2 


.0 


42 


95 


Baltimore 


2 


4 




8 


70 


9 


8 


9 


7 


.3 


5.9 




.7 


1 


.1 


47 


11 


Calvert 


3 


6 


2 


1 


75 


1 


3 


4 


7 


4 


2.9 


3 


.3 


2 


.2 


3 


35 


Caroline 


o 


3 


2 





76 


4 


4 


9 


6 


1 


4.8 


2 


4 


1 


.1 


1 


57 


Carroll 


1 


8 


2 


1 


77 


1 


4 


9 




2 


2.4 


2 


8 


1 


.7 


15 


50 


Cecil 


2 


3 


2 


2 


73 


6 


5 


1 


8 


9 


4.4 




.9 


1 


.6 


38 


69 


Charles 


2 


7 


1 


7 


74 




4 


3 


10 


9 


2.8 


2 


4 




.1 


32 


43 


Dorchester 


2 


2 




8 


74 


7 


3 


4 


8 


8 


3.3 


2 


4 


3 


.4 


60 


69 


Frederick 


2 


1 




6 


74 


8 


4 


2 


7 


9 


5.9 


2 


2 


1 


3 


18 


24 


Garrett 


2 


9 


2 





75 


5 


3 


5 


7 




2.8 


2 


1 


4 


1 


19 


97 


Harford 


2 


8 


1 


4 


71 


3 


5 


4 


10 





4.1 


4 





1 





51 


59 


Howard 


2 


9 


1 


9 


77 


8 


4 


2 


7 


1 


2.7 


2 


4 


1 





38 


79 


Kent 


3 


4 


2 


5 


74 


6 


4 


5 


8 


5 


3.2 


2 


2 






16 


73 


Montgomery 


2 


3 


1 


7 


70 


1 


6 


2 


9 


8 


4.8 


4 







1 


39 


45 


Prince George's . . . 


1 


7 




7 


68 


4 


7 


6 


11 





6.0 


2 


2 




4 


39 


37 


Queen Anne's 


3 


2 


2 


4 


73 


2 


5 


7 


7 


3 


4.4 


2 


7 


1 




36 


48 


St. Mary's 


3 





2 


7 


67 


5 


5 


3 


10 


4 


7.7 


2 


5 





9 


42 


OH 


Somerset 


2 


4 


2 


4 


77 


1 


3 


4 


6 


9 


4.5 


1 


6 


1 


7 


28 


27 


Talbot 


2 


3 


2 


1 


74 


9 


3 


8 


9 


1 


4.4 




8 


1 


6 


46 


39 


Washington 


3 


6 


2 





75 


8 


4 




7 


5 


2.6 


3 


2 


1 


2 


27 


02 


Wicomico 


2 


7 


1 


8 


73 


4 


5 


9 


6 





4.7 


3 


3 


2 


2 


65 


53 


Worcester 


3 





1 


9 


72 


7 


4 


9 


8 


1 


5.5 


1 


9 


2 





49 


57 



* Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding debt 
service. 

t Appropriations of State and local funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Retirement for county 
teachers not distributed to the counties in this column. 



142 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 85 



Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Administration: State of Maryland: 
1945, 1950, 1953, and 1954 



County 


1945 


1950 


1953 


1954 


Total State 


$2 


67 


$5 


93 


$6 


48 


$5 


23 


Baltimore City 


3 


32 


7 


89 


8 


23 


6 


02 


Total Counties 


2 


27 


4 


94 


5 


63 


4 


86 


Allegany . 


1 


92 


5 


37 


6 


37 


4 


67 


Anne Arundel 


2 


53 


4 


32 


5 


83 


5 


73 


Baltimore 


1 


41 


3 


90 


5 


03 


4 


94 


Calvert 


3 


88 


7 


48 


8 


35 


6 


2 A 


Caroline 


3 


88 


5 


46 


6 


34 


4 


69 


Carroll 


2 


35 


5 


16 


4 


77 


3 


11 


Cecil 


2 


46 


4 


10 


4 


40 


4 


34 


Charles 


2 


45 


4 


05 


6 


37 


5 


23 


Dorchester 


2 


84 


5 


04 


5 


87 


4 


28 


Frederick 


1 


94 


3 


47 


4 


10 


3 


63 



County 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne s. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 



Washington 

Wicomico. . 
Worcester 



1945 



$3.68 
2.02 
2.87 
4.07 
2.80 

1.41 

4.38 
4.53 
3.03 
3.64 

1.85 
3.10 
2.31 



1950 



1953 



$5.26 
4.86 
5.70 
8.44 
5.39 

4.65 
5.71 
6.47 
5.29 
4.67 

6.44 
4.87 
5.23 



$7.69 
5.66 
6.61 
9.83 
5.58 

4.76 
5.81 
7.20 
6.05 
5.58 

7.17 
6.00 
6.76 



See TABLES VI and XIV for basic data. 
Note: 1954 costs are lower due to Pupil Personnel Services now being show under "Other School 
Services." 



TABLE 86 



Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses: Counties of Maryland: 

1923-1954 



Year 


All Schools 


Elementary Schools 


High Schools 


Totalf 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923 


$43 


00 


$46 


22 


$17 


07 


$34 


84 


$39 


84 


$17 


08 


$90 


79 


$91 


12 


$77 


38 


1928 


52 


62 


55 


85 


24 


25 


42 


91 


47 


81 


22 


97 


93 


51 


95 


82 


52 


13 


1933 


51 


89 


54 


37 


25 


95 


42 


51 


46 


82 


24 


12 


79 


32 


82 


35 


44 


34 


1938 


61 


12 


63 


20 


35 


15 


50 


70 


53 


41 


30 


10 


87 


59 


90 


87 


58 


54 


1943 


71 


16 


72 


48 


56 


54 


60 


39 


60 


70 


48 


34 


100 


46 


102 


57 


84 


23 


1945° 


86 


64 


86 


62 


68 


30 


72 


37 


74 


83 


60 


23 


120 


87 


123 


04 


105 


18 


1946J 


98 


28 


98 


27 


76 


97 


80 


29 


83 


15 


67 


46 


124 


73 


127 


02 


107 


44 


1947 


114 


54 


114 


15 


91 


43 


92 


83 


95 


84 


76 


69 


145 


20 


147 


66 


134 


92 


1948 


157 


30 


153 


19 


122 


59 


124 


19 


128 


27 


105 


62 


194 


71 


198 


28 


169 


78 


1949 


172 


47 


163 


29 


133 


69 


133 


08 


136 


89 


115 


20 


207 


84 


211 


59 


182 


48 


1950 


176 


92 


166 


09 


140 


53 


137 


60 


140 


91 


121 


18 


208 


07 


211 


11 


187 


57 


1951 


186 


34 


170 


05 


156 


26 


141 


80 


143 


51 


132 


52 


214 


60 


215 


81 


206 


56 


1952 


206 


80 


193 


05 


178 


44 


162 


26 


164 


27 


150 


97 


240 


20 


241 


32 


232 


73 


1953 


216 


17 


201 


34 


190 


57 


172 


94 


174 


35 


164 


34 


246 


25 


247 


36 


239 


07 


1954 


226 


44 


207 


43 


207 


17 


181 


55 


182 


06 


178 


20 


252 


69 


251 


80 


258 


64 



t Administration, fixed charges and kindergartens are included in the total for all schools but are ex- 
cluded elsewhere in this table. 

X Prior to 1946, pupils in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary 
and not high school pupils. 

Includes State and county bonus. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



istra- 


Fixed 
Chargest 


Rank 








cm co x cm 


CM >* CO »H CO 




i- i X X H O 
CM n in 




Admini 


4J 


Ifl 




to 


'tCOCOOOO 


x t> m m x 
o> x cm co -f 


cm en m m co 
co co m t- o 


x m x t- x 


O X CO 


Cos 


t- 

a* 


t» 


t~ 


t- cn t~ © co 


lO t> © lO 


C- CO CO OI X 


CO X CO I- t- 


OI t- OI 




1 


Rank 










00 Oi Oi CM 
n ii CM 


• cm m t- eo 


KOHOIO 

HHC1H 


m t- x 




o 


Cost 


CM 

to 


t~ 

lO 


-« 

(0 


CTi CO CO 0*5 Ol 
0C CO O CO ^fl* 


x co n o> 
m cji in « oo 


• cm m in cm 

■ X n CM if 


n t- CM X © 
OI X ii ii CO 


m oi t- 
oi cm oi 




3 


$276 


x 

CM 


oo 

CM 


co m e?> cm 

CO CM CO CM CM 


H1C0CHO) 

CO 01 CM 01 
CMCMCMCMH 


• m cm x 

CM CM CM X 


CM CM CM CM CM 


mow 

CM CM CM 


:hools 


s 


Rank 








toocj-io 


OC O 00 CM 


t-rtOiciia 


aHTCtcc 


m x x 

— CM 


u 
W 


Whii 


Cost 


<5 
»a 


(0 


O 

OC 


eo m o oc <j> 

f (ONNO 


m CO CC CM 


OI CO X CO CM 
OI CM OI ri t— 


x x x m m 


CO X X 
OI n t- 


High 


$264. 


M 


CM 


m co as «o 

CM CM CM CM CM 


ffiHOHOO 
CM CM CM CM CM 


f f f m t~ 

CM CM CM CM CM 


IONOOCh 
CM X CM CM CM 


m in co 

CM CM CM 




H 


Rank 








m ^ICfc CM ■*}« 
n CM n 


en in eo 

iH f-l CM 


O X CM X 
n CM 


Xm©X 


CD CM CO 
rHCM 




o 




t> 
oo 


OC 


0> 
(0 


n CM OS tJ< X 
HdOClQO 


eo eo t- o co 

Of HHM 


oi oi m x m 


OliOt^OO 
CM CM t> O O 


C-HX 
XTf Tjl 






Cos 


$266. 


o 
c 
eo 


CM 
m 
CM 


t-OClMN 

t»< eo m m t- 

CM CM CM CM CM 


oi eo c- <-< to 
eo t> tj< t- cm 

CM CM CM CM CM 


f toooo 

X CO OI X 
CM CM CM CM CM 


CMCOCMXX 

f oi m m 

CM CM CM CM CM 


CO X X 
Tt> CM t> 

CM CM CM 





ink 








X X CM 01 t> 


HtCOON 
1 1 CM CM 


•Oicof ih 


co m in cm 




T3 

eu 




















ilor 




° 


CO 
CO 


o 

CM 


CI f ii X OS 
OI XX X © 


m CM X CM o 


■ o t> m co 


x t> t CO 

f x w m t> 


f ox 
co co co 


U 


Cos 


$187 


X 
OJ 


X 

t~ 


x f m Tf m 
x m 1-" m x 




•xxxm 

X CO CI X 


XNXHOl 

xcicotcc 


XO^i 

co co co 




ink 










CMOCOOX 
CM CM — i CM 


x n m i cm 

CM 1 


co x —i cm m 


t-XOS 


m 


05 






















co 
o 


t> 

CO 


CO 

o 


lOt-WOO) 


rf CO CO X X 

IflHf f * 


XOMWH 

w x t> w 


m x o t> x 
f- ixocoo 


—1 CO X 
f O o 




Cos 


$188 


t- 
c 

CM 


CM 
X 


t>xnwt> 

XCOOCOOJ 


co x cm m 
w co oi ci w 


oi © t> n © 

CM rtH CM CM 


SNH51X 
t> 01 01 X CI 


in cox 
coos 




ink 








x o x m 

CM -i i 


cm « co w x 

CM 1 _i CM 


CM O f X n 
CM n 




(OXH 


"3 


05 






















X 


§ 


m 
m 


t-MlOt»0C 

t-xoi©w 


Hfrtoio 
COXOIX© 


XOi-iXX 


TJ< X O X X 
CCOICMXOI 


XTff 

CM f O 




1 
U 


$187 


CM 

o 

C) 


00 


O ii X X f 

X CO X t> 01 


m co x t> m 


oi x m co cm 

OC3SOH 
CM— 1-iCMCM 


MIOtOX 
NOXNX 


OCOX 



ii CM O CM 

m t- m x cm 

CM ii CM i-i CM 



Ot>COXCJ5 

oxen xm 

CM CM — I iH tH 



■ CM t> m rj< 
i— i C75 CM CO 
CM -H CM CM 



oot»mo hi 

CM CM CT. CO Ot CM c 
N M ii H H CM i 



CMomcom o>c~ot>cM os-cx. 



X CM t X i 



r}> X t> CO O) 
i-i X O CM CM 
CM CM CM CM 



ci en c-j f m 

X Oi CM CM X 
i-H CM CM — I 



X m -H CM 
CM X -H f X 
CM "H CM CM CM 



hOXO f f O 
- f i-i CM CM O X X 
ICMCMCMCM CM^HCM 



X CM f t~ C7J 



oomu cocTsxcMX ofmxx 

CMOI-h^-X 050-<CMX MO>Hf f 
CM'HCMCMCM i-i CM CM CM — I CM ii CM CM CM 



coxxenen fxm 

O'I'rtOH i-i Oi CM 

CM CM CM CM CM CM i— * CM 



5 ^ pt..E 

6 2 1 >■§ 
cu c^i: £ 
s c cs es cs 
<<CQUU 



x Sg-2 
I S C 



Sei^|£ 



_ i- u a, 

oj o ca j *j 
S ea o 8j o 



CiO'MicE- 



l8| 

•S O ° 

s.2 o 
£££ 



H 00 Ei 



o o 



3 C 

« O 
•»-> J3 
3 " 

fl 

u O 



I t 

° E « 



o g 

tnt- 1 

■g « 

3 bf 



"c X 



3 § CJ 

"tfc 
o 



c 
a 

d* 

II 

C 
fly m 
JS C 
<-> CS 



ll 

« rt 



II 



i EX 



XXCOXXO 
X Tf CM i-i CM ii 

CM CM CM CM CM CM 



mil 

^°eI s - s 

O ed O 
r-ttE- 



o CS * 
— 4J X 

.2 £K 

m 

cs ^Ei 

HI 



144 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 88 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Elementary Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1954 









Instructional Service 














Total 






















CyOUNTY 


Current 






Salaries of 












Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


• 

Mainte- 


School 








vision! 


and 










nance 


Services 












Teachers 
















$188 


06 


$3 


.51 


$133 


.56 


$10 


.58 


$17 


34 


ti n i r 


* 1 ■> Q1 


Baltimore City 


207 


67 


4 


89 


157 


30 


12 


10 


19 


59 


10.32 


3.47 




182 


06 


3 


08 


126 


30 


10 


12 


16 


65 


in ii 

IV . L l 


15 80 


Allegany 


187 


85 


3 


90 


133 


32 


6 


.50 


15 


90 


9.41 


18.82 


Anne Arundel .... 


163 


47 


2 


09 


115 


58 


8 


51 


14 


27 


9.16 


13.86 


Baltimore 


181 


63 




90 


129 


74 


14 


44 


13 


29 


12.06 


10.20 


Calvert 


205 


10 


6 


17 


128 


86 


4 


83 


15 


29 


5.13 


44.82 


Caroline 


197 


49 


3 


.55 


131 


68 


7 


.47 


12 


55 


9.18 


33.06 


Carroll 


156 


54 


2 


.51 


112 


77 


6 


27 


10 


87 


3.42 


20.70 


Cecil 


161 


16 


2 


63 


110 


74 


6 


80 


13 


38 


6.42 


21 .19 


Charles 


198 


46 


3 


09 


136 


33 


8 


34 


17 


97 


4.64 


28.09 


Dorchester 


192 


48 


2 


78 


131 


00 


4 


51 


15 


62 


5.35 


33.22 


Frederick 


155 


83 


2 


53 


104 


45 


5 


39 


13 


30 


11.08 


19.08 


Garrett 


209 


58 


4 


21 


139 


17 


3 


74 


12 


43 


5.68 


44.35 


Harford 


160 


89 


2 


17 


109 


16 


5 


91 


13 


82 


6.77 


23.06 


Howard 


177 


73 


2 


45 


124 


06 


5 


25 


12 


41 


4.77 


28.79 


Kent 


211 


53 


5 


27 


139 


90 


6 


89 


18 


80 


6.08 


34.59 


Montgomery 


210 


71 


4 


51 


143 


52 


14 


19 


26 


29 


13.05 


9.15 


Prince George's . . 


177 


15 


3 


35 


122 


33 


11 


89 


19 


68 


12.69 


7.21 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


197 


38 


4 


68 


128 


23 


9 


22 


11 


61 


7.55 


36.09 


St. Mary's 


191 


00 


3 


20 


110 


01 


9 


24 


22 


35 


12.55 


33.65 




189 


67 


4 


14 


131 


10 


5 


16 


10 


48 


9.06 


29.73 


Talbot 


198 


58 


4 


26 


134 


76 


5 


50 


16 


61 


12.17 


25.28 


Washington 


175 


41 


3 


76 


129 


36 


5 


49 


14 


76 


5.33 


16.71 


Wicomico 


166 


76 


3 


01 


111 


66 


8 


34 


11 


23 


7.84 


24.68 


Worcester 


193 


03 


2 


63 


126 


98 


6 


45 


14 


47 


9.45 


33.05 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 89 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Junior, Junior-Senior, and 
Senior High and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1954 









Instructional Service 














Total 




















County 


Current 




Salaries of 












Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Princ 


pals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


School 








visionf 


an 










nance 


Services 










Teachers 














Total State .... 


$264 


59 


$4 .82 


$190 


41 


$15 


17 


$23.18 


$10 


67 


$20.34 


Baltimore City 


304 


67 


6.35 


228 


50 


14 


05 


33.25 


13 


56 


8.96 


Total Counties . . . 


251 


80 


4.34 


178 


26 


15 


52 


19.97 


9 


74 


23.97 


Allegany 


245 


43 


3.35 


171 


47 


13 


54 


21.06 


10 


67 


25.34 


Anne Arundel .... 


236 


65 


5.35 


165 


87 


13 


48 


17.87 


11 


70 


22.38 


Baltimore 


254 


20 


5.37 


171 


76 


22 


85 


17.64 


11 


78 


24.80 


Calvert 


259 


28 




160 


03 


9 


26 


15.13 


5 


95 


68.91 


Caroline 


276 


09 


i'.6i 


197 


86 


14 


54 


12.61 


11 


26 


35.31 


Carroll 


239 


45 


5.64 


176 


00 


11 


92 


15.87 


5 


67 


24.35 


Cecil 


271 


53 


7.20 


193 


06 


14 


43 


22.58 


11 


38 


22.88 


Charles 


260 


78 


.80 


185 


34 


9 


04 


25.99 


6 


79 


32.82 


Dorchester 


271 


07 


3.62 


189 


64 


10 


49 


24.55 


8 


49 


34.28 


Frederick 


228 


72 


2.73 


167 


04 


9 


52 


14.18 


11 


04 


24.21 


Garrett 


244 


99 


3.33 


150 


41 


11 


04 


15.52 


4 


74 


59.95 


Harford 


234 


26 


3.01 


157 


03 


14 


90 


23.98 


8 


29 


27.05 


Howard 


264 


98 


3.83 


192 


51 


12 


33 


17.11 


6 


26 


32.94 


Kent 


295 


16 


6.03 


203 


50 


14 


.71 


21.49 


10 


52 


38.91 


Montgomery 


277 


.72 


4.24 


214 


22 


12 


.18 


21.89 


10 


.87 


14.32 


Prince George's . . 


236 


83 


3.41 


167 


43 


19 


.43 


26.61 


6 


.83 


13.12 


Queen Qnne's. . . . 


307 


.48 


5.57 


202 


79 


17 


.07 


24.32 


10 


.12 


47.61 


St. Mary's 


250 


53 


4.86 


136 


50 


13 


.56 


18.90 


24 


.78 


51.93 


Somerset 


278 


.85 


6.76 


200 


11 


8 


.37 


21.34 


10 


.24 


32.03 


Talbot 


251 


.45 


6.07 


170 


67 


13 


.17 


21.85 


6 


.98 


32.71 


Washington 


245 


.96 


4.78 


187 


26 


12 


.02 


15.94 


5 


.41 


20.55 


Wicomico 


225 


.18 


2.67 


155 


01 


14 


.08 


10.82 


12 


.38 


30.22 


Worcester 


286 


.78 


3.73 


193 


06 


13 


.77 


20.76 


16 


.78 


38.68 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXII for basic data. 



146 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 90 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Elementary Schools: Year 

Ending June 30, 1954 









Instructional Service 
















Total 


























County 


Current 






Salaries of 
















Other 




Expenses 


Sup 


er- 


Principals 




Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


Sehool 








visiont 


an 


d 












nance 


Services 












Teachers 


















Total State 


1 1 87 
$18 t 


uo 




89 


$136 


88 




$10.03 


$10 




$8 


14 


$12.25 


Baltimore City 


193 


66 


4 


07 


149 


03 




11.84 


17 


28 


8 


40 


3.04 


Total Counties 


178 


20 


3 


66 


120 


69 




7 


62 


13 


91 


7 


80 


24.52 


Allegany 


183 


99 


6 


05 


135 


67 




7.28 


18 


24 


11 


02 


5.73 


Anne Arundel .... 


154 


84 


2 


04 


116 


88 




4 


95 


12 


29 


3 


42 


15.26 


Baltimore 


215 


31 


3 


57 


155 


83 




14 


54 


14 


02 


13 


49 


13.86 


Calvert 


154 


83 


4 


95 


105 


71 




3 


12 


7 


76 


4 


04 


29.25 


Caroline 


185 


09 


4 


38 


116 


26 




5.73 


9 


98 


9 


19 


39 .55 


Carroll 


178 


45 


4 


46 


112 


61 




5.45 


12 


77 


3 


58 


39.58 


Cecil 


197 


12 


3 


08 


119 


33 




6 


88 


19 


42 


14 


20 


34.21 


Charles 


179 


98 


3 


07 


109 


55 




6.75 


21 


73 


5 


65 


33.23 


Dorchester 


144 


02 


5 


01 


90 


34 




3 


91 


8 


34 


6 


80 


29.62 




138 


10 


3 


56 


99 


88 




5 


13 


12 


27 


1 


40 


15.86 


Garrett 






























Harford 


183 


00 


4 


05 


112 


is 




7 


74 


2i 


75 


6 


9i 


30.37 


Howard 


168 


17 


4 


93 


115 


56 




4 


02 


8 


73 


3 


25 


31.68 


Kent 


193 


25 


5 


34 


123 


22 




5 


50 


11 


93 


3 


74 


43.52 




235 


76 


1 


46 


157 


58 




12 


39 


22 


76 


11 


80 


30.27 


Prince George's . . 


188 


41 


3 


54 


127 


84 




10 


67 


18 


52 


12 


50 


15.34 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


192 


38 


4 


69 


121 


43 




10 


99 


7 


59 


11 


34 


36.34 


St. Mary's 


168 


57 


7 


39 


102 


76 




3 


68 


9 


97 


4 


67 


40.10 


Somerset 


141 


54 


2 


75 


96 


41 




5 


82 


8 


69 


4 


66 


23.21 


Talbot 


169 


76 


3 


31 


121 


21 




2 


81 


12 


42 


6 


39 


23.62 


Washington 


168 


64 






128 


95 




6 


38 


19 


96 


6 


21 


7.14 


Wicomico 


169 


60 


4 


62 


118 


01 




6 


80 


5 


56 


6 


66 


27.95 


Worcester 


161 


63 


5 


22 


98 


82 




6.09 


9 


15 


8 


24 


34.11 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXIII for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 91 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and 
Senior High and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1954 









Instructional Service 
















Total 
























County 


Current 






Salaries of 












Other 




Expenses 


Sup 


er- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


l^ainte- 


School 








visiont 


an 


d 










nancc 


Services 












Teachers 
















Total State 


$276 


.62 


$5 


.63 


$201 


.51 


$13 


.28 


$22 


80 


$12 .38 


$21 


02 


Baltimore City 




O 1 


5 


86 


229 


.18 








DC 

oo 


12 .65 


7 


29 


Total Counties 


258 


64 


5 


38 


172 


.15 


12 


.80 


20 


62 


12.09 


36 


60 


Allegany 


346 


89 


14 


40 


236 


30 


27 


.30 


23 


13 


18 72 


27 


04 


Anne Arundel .... 


205 


33 






147 


.04 


9 


.68 


16 


21 


4^26 


28 


14 


Baltimore 


319 


03 


23 


95 


207 


27 


22 


.91 


24 


84 


17.09 


22 


97 


Calvert 


242 


39 






155 


55 


10 


05 


17 


98 


5.85 


52 


96 


Caroline 


284 


49 


3 


12 


186 


.39 


12 


33 


13 


80 


15.45 


53 


40 


Carroll 


231 


53 


5 


26 


163 


.26 


10 


.65 


13 


57 


5.36 


33 


43 


Cecil 


296 


96 


7 


43 


188 


21 


13 


40 


25 


04 


6.56 


56 


32 


Charles 


228 


51 


6 


66 


152 


36 


7 


51 


18 


44 


5.02 


38 


52 


Dorchester 


271 


17 


1 


95 


195 


01 


8 


48 


21 


.53 


4.52 


39 


68 


Frederick 


199 


89 


3 


55 


143 


49 


9 


36 


12 


59 


2.67 


28 


.23 


Garrett 




























Harford 


255 


32 


2 


66 


180 


86 


13 


3i 


22 


61 


9.85 


26 


03 




242 


15 


7 


15 


168 


86 


11 


93 


14 


48 


6.84 


32 


89 


Kent 


278 


25 


5 


06 


186 


22 


12 


04 


17 


29 


5.68 


51 


96 


Montgomery 


317 


42 


1 


83 


221 


38 


11 


81 


21 


22 


10.54 


50 


64 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


274 


91 


3 


39 


160 


03 


16 


71 


31 


36 


34.48 


28 


94 


265 


37 


5 


11 


175 


79 


10 


69 


17 


98 


9.28 


46 


52 




258 


12 


7 


65 


161 


42 


9 


81 


16 


93 


10.03 


52 


28 




215 


18 


4 


37 


153 


34 


5 


45 


11 


32 


9.42 


31 


28 


Talbot 


239 


60 






175 


43 


7 


58 


21 


49 


3.51 


31 


59 


Washington 


285 


95 






236 


47 


6 


82 


28 


73 


6.21 


7 


72 


Wicomico 


237 


29 


2 


45 


168 


05 


13 


67 


12 


81 


2.45 


87 


86 


Worcester 


245 


97 


3 


57 


145 


99 


14 


76 


20 


60 


5.85 


55 


20 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXIV for basic data. 



148 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 92 



Average Annual Salary per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1954 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


1923 




$ 990 


$1,436 


$ 513 


$ 906 


1928 




1,155 


1,544 


602 


897 


1933 




1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 


1938 




1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1943 




1,539 


1,735 


1,291 


1,450 


1945 




1,862 


2,042 


1,599 


1,719 


1946 




2,027 


2,183 


1,737 


1,845 


1947 




2,306 


2,439 


2,002 


2,100 


1948 




3,234 


3,446 


3,157 


3,178 


1949 




3,236 


3,318 


2,916 


2,885 


1950 




3,342 


8,344 


3,023 


2,888 


1951 




3,418 


3,359 


3,126 


2,934 


1952 




3,637 


3,646 


3,385 


3,272 


1953 




3,733 


3,726 


3,535 


3,358 


1954 




3,723 


3,853 


3,697 


8,518 



Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



_<-. 
2 
ft. 

c 

JS 

2 



u 

jS 

K 
« 

«- 

> 

i 

at 
W 
CO 

< 



,080 


x 


CI 

t- 

tO 


O fflt- C t- 

if oo t-- ii o to 

O tO C7> CI CJ 


oait-xo 
x o t- f a 


© t~ O X 

CI r< f | H 


OMOXh 


ooo 

XlOfl 
Oi CJ CI 


to 






iO m tc 10 IO 


f in >t t f 


iC to ia to 


If f IO f ifi 


iO lO m 



X tf X (Ct-mnt ICKHflOt^ *!• iO (35 t- CI O iO <o O CI X (O 1* 

•-i m x t-cntoxx t^-t^ox ooioxcj o>09>cm toox 

*h o t~ x^i.o oj_—_ cc cj to_.-« t~ in ^.'^'.cciocc "^"l * e v" , L °t '\ 1=1 i 

hO co cococococo cococococo x x x x *j* x x cj x x cococo 



waiowo t~ t> a> to ci 
co to »h b- x »h r- m i« 

JHfiCflf *t t> CJ l> tO 



rr m to a> cj 

X m in to X 



in in UC X O x x 
to M5 ^ f IO O t~ CO 



X X CO X X X X X X X X *Q X X X X X 



CJ t- tO IB X 
m to O CJ X 
x m x cj m 



to CJ O X 
»-i into x 
to to — i m t~- 



x x o t-i m 

lOtOt'rtO) 



X X O O XK5N 

hhwxw aif o 



-»r x oto—tt^m ©toox© c-mino^ 1 o <-i to »h oohb 

in i-t ooxat- as x x » t- x o o o t ojx^cjto m m x 

in e t ^. r, l. oc . c i t ^. t ^. <o .' o . 0( ^. ,1 !. u9io»hwu9 x^in in 

"•I* X XXXXX X X X X X XXXXX XXXXX XXX 



© r-i © hm«o« t-xxteto ci ih o t- to xfnwa to o x 

cj »h cj oi *— 1 x to cj nNNXt- est x c— ci t-« to x m m mxto 

o_ r- ts i lC . o i'^'. 0C . to_to_to^in x^totc^ccin t-to^cjx^to osto^in 

^J* ^ X xxxxx XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX XXX 



m « >«♦• cj — c m to oi ^ x -h x f to o a> x x x cj <7i 
x cj t> t> o o cj cj xawoix to cj oi x cj -# © to 
cj ot»H«ji t^oi'isx to o m i-i x cj t> x m cj to in 



m u 1 o ^i" 



•«?■ m m to ic^r' 



o> to cj •-! m i-i m x 1 

x in o to i 

t> to t-^^<7i_cj^in "*<c eo into ioioio«>t>^ winqwif oi^x 

XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX XXX 



xxmcnm Tt> m t- ai to 

p> x © »■« ^cjocoocj xinptooc crjfoo 



toicjxx xt^xxto 
totoi-unx fatctcc 
x m o x to m to f to 



(- 01 00 00 ^< 

<o to m x 



X O CT> X Tf 



tCf* 

1 ci cji x in 
i to hm in oi to f 



CO X X ^i* X CO X X X CO X X X X X CO X X X X CO 



XXX 



3 3) 

hill 



= II p 1- 



_ 1- u 

a> o as „ , 
t*C * c c 



i 



1 



-j E - <<0QUO OOOQtx, CKK«S cucywwH 



111 

Sis is 



C 

0) 

.1 



BaS 

0> x 
11 



9 
it 

{35 
Sf g 

31 

! 

IB 

9 u 
c c 

.2? 03 
-CJ3 

°s 

CJ 

a 

2* c 
£& 

sl 

t\ 



150 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



I 

8* 




•tr 

! 


1 § I ii! !!!!! &£ ill II 




I 


I 


! 


I g I III IIIII III! ill II 




S 

>< 


1 


1 ! I iiili III! 111! Ill II 




I 
| 


8 
1 

i 


I 


1 1 ! !!§§§ !!!!! !!!!! 1!!!! !!! 


1 
S 

! 


i 


! 


1 ! I III! ill! III II 


i 

15 


I 


< 


1 


" g « ££§38 S£xS2 ?,£g£2 

| S 1 £333 Sills Ss-S- 


unior colleges an 
ard to division of 


| 
i 




i 


I I I I!!!! §!§§§ II!!! ill 




S3 

J 

s 


All Schools 


1 


1 ! I m 111! Ill III III 


I 
I 


TABLE 94— Average Salary* p 




1 


I ! I III 1114 ill 111! II 


>■ 
z 

p 

o 
O 


Total State 

Total Counties 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Worcester 


* Grades 1 through 12 o 
t Includas all principals 



Maryland State Department of Education- 



is! 



! 



«o O © © iO © < 



t- iO lO<Ct 



1 1 1 §1111 IIIIS illl! IS III 



I ! 1 illff Illl ill! Ill II 



I 



1 1 ! III! HT illl 111! 11 



1 ! I ill III illl! SHIS & 



1 ! I ill ill 111 Hi 11! 



i 



i 



1 1 ! m III! ill!! !!!!! I! 



1 1 ! §§§ III illl Hi II! 



! 1 1 li! III! Hi! Ill II 



| 

I 

1 

III 



if 



r- CQ f- 



I i 1 1 1 j I 



1 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 





| 


1 '-SSg^ £SS£2 SSSSS 83888 KSS 

CO N-<5 CM — — . CM CM 

t£ — «- CO CM CM — 






s sssjgi: sss5;k ssrsss 3SS33S ssss 

00 —.Or- C-J tfifCMCMC© OWN'-N C> — — — C3CMCM 


Is 

11 


i 

s 


5 Soo»i S£SSS ZZSSZ ScoSSS sss 

-r S»* — trMNMto (NTN-q — c^cm — 

w —* cm" m " - ~" 


1 


2 


1 gSSSg SSSSS SSSSS = S£SS 22S 

CO O_00 3C —I f CO — CM »/5 CM T CM — lO CO — — — CJJ — — 




i 
1 


g Ss§5SS§ SSSKS SSSS'co SSS 
1 m Si 51 g §1 21 




1 


55 S^cm^S SSScoS 

gg,g ^ g * 




1 


SSSSS gSSSS SScococS SSS 

u 




1 


1 sssss gssss sssss ssass ScoS 

q co cm t- — — — — *n tr> cm 


! 


1 


| SSScSS Qc^Sccoo 238*3 "SS 

00 CO CM tD ' 1 — — »0 lO CM 

CO 


s. 
! 

! 


1 


S SSgSS S2SK8 SSRSS SSS 

CO CM CM — > — — — T T CM 
CO 


1 


3 SS2SS SSSSS §SSS3 SSS 

CO CM CM «5 rH »-i — — CO T CM 
CO 


g 


1 


co SSSSS SSSSS SSSSS SSSSS ggs 


1 

1 
Z 


1 


S SSSScS SSSSScS SS-coS SSS 

— — . — — ' 




1 


| =SS5S wSSS* SSSSS £cM=ScO £38 




1 


93 ,264 

7,228 
7,147 
18,235 
651 
1,249 

3,434 
2,483 
1,296 
1,476 
4,331 

1,796 
3,784 
1,663 
832 
12,060 

13,336 
941 
960 
916 
1,090 

6,396 
1,737 
1,234 


I 

PL, 


1 


*86 ,811 

7 ,189 
6,493 
16,702 
623 
1 ,205 

3,267 
2,437 
1 ,266 
1,470 
4,297 

1,751 
3,464 
1 ,474 
758 
10,549 

12,358 
908 
862 
888 
1,035 

6,170 
1,523 
1,171 


1 


♦81 ,089 

7 ,028 
5,982 
15,149 
595 
1 ,169 

3 ,081 
2 ,302 
1,197 
1 ,398 
4,001 

1,767 
3,180 
1,397 
735 
9,495 

11,374 

898 
832 
886 
977 

6,030 
1,447 
1,113 


I 
1 


1 


♦76 ,028 

6 ,949 
5 ,490 
13,978 
510 
1 ,102 

2,932 
2,182 
1 ,133 
1,355 
3 ,790 

1,625 
2,987 
1 ,336 
739 
8,625 

10,205 
867 
791 
900 
1,001 

5,819 
1,412 
1,103 


! 


1 


♦37,891 

3 ,589 
2,746 
6,436 
283 
703 

1,701 
1 ,245 
587 
919 
2,361 

1 ,037 
1 ,642 
709 
450 
2 ,936 

4,240 
470 
411 
542 
576 

2,671 
1,148 
691 




1 


♦38,492 

4 ,167 
2,484 
5 ,788 
217 
853 

1,835 
1,344 
636 
1,006 
2,507 

1,225 
1,571 
726 
518 
3 ,020 

3,584 
543 
417 
792 
695 

2,715 
1,273 
802 




1 


♦31 ,786 

3 ,543 
2 ,074 
4 ,580 
250 
779 

1,586 
1,186 
531 
896 
2,018 

989 
1,411 
582 
534 
1,855 

2,347 
533 
344 
706 
767 

2,394 
1 ,255 
790 


County 


Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel ... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Charles 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's . . . 

Queen Anne's 

St Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



a m 10 ci - — r- o — »o 



CDOJfl N»-rO!0 fNiO 



o co f O co wo «c-rt~ — cr. 
co Mwoitoio ci — a> f 

~i CI CI — 



1 9 — 10 *o 



us or. to CM i 



N CO N IO « 



iCOCCt O "O tC U5 CI I - io -r 

> -r co -r Of -rwm c-i co cp 



co of mom t>aooo-< 



■f OO -iOCCIC. »0 



CO l»f !OOI- U5IOOI 



i IO CI M f f K 



= CI M f f Cl l~ CO 



ooooo ooooo 



■oooo ooooo ooo 

■ tC 05 t- ! 
CM — — ■ 



ooooo ooooo 



■ oooo ooooo ooo 



O O COO o 

CO — lO ©5 t— 



■OOiOO O O ci io o ooo 



noaoo 
co r^l oe t-- co 



CO O 00 O US 

t - -NCC! 
— CI CI — 



•O0«0t>. «0 O O 00 iO r^^-O 

■ f N CC N OS CO I 
CJ — ~ CO CO < 



-r t f a-, o 

f f -ilfiN 



oooo-r 

fiCSNNtd 



• f O O CM OSOCOOI 
■ !>. IO CO C! JC IO CO CI ( 



CIWO) 



CO O OS O CO 

* cc cn cc 



— oooo 

f f NON 



•OsOOO OOOOO MOO 

>o ci ic i» t^ioocoioo ci co os 



ooo o o 
co OS : ci t- 



OOOO"? 
CO CO IO CO CO 



*- CIO f OOOOO f xo 
"W ■ T -T CMCOCNt-lO OJO-T 



MCOOICCf 
i-l>.f f M 



CO 00 CO o 
O) O) CN M Oi 
■— I — CS «0 CO 



:Of * 
'CM- 



CO OO K) U5 CO 



io co o «o < 

f ~r iCf i 



o os os »o io 

oe ci o o o 



•Mf CJM f-— IO CO lO CO — CO 

• 00 00 O CO iflf MNCN -r CM — 

• f CO CO 00 ~ CO CO CO f »-<»oco 



00 OS IO CO CO CO •— 1 IO 

Nnnoa cm — o 



-IOOONCC OS f O O IO 



f CO CO CO OO N M IO f 



— CO CO CM 



IOOOCCOI- «5 — « 00 
f NCI 30 IO CO — O IOCMO 
• CO CM f CO 



— • — CO CO ' 



— O CO o — 



lOCO IO > 



> a> CONOCN- 



alJN sssgl 

=3 s cu ca c« c«S-cc£: s«oojO •Carols 



9> O C to ' ' O ■ 

I Mb* : |J| 

111 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



Public 
Funds 
Spent 

per 
Pupil 
Trans- 
ported 


CM CM IN CM Ol CM CM CO CO 03 


ENSE 






Colored 


t~ I— fc» t~ t— fc* t~- 


BL 

X 

w 

o 

a 
a) 


Yansporte 


X 


White 


mmmiftinmcotOtCCC 


d to School at Pi 


Per Cent 1 


mtary 


Colored 




E 

09 

W 


White 


cc^t-xxcftxcjixt^ 


H 
PS 

o 
£ 

En 
2 

i 




JS 


Colored 


CM •— ' <7s lO O t- CM «— ' C7> t~ 

«-*^*cj}»-*co^j'cnx^f^* 
cn cc a; inriNsi «£ rf 
ec^ricmtot^xxoo 


a 




be 

£ 


9 

1 


•*^ONociffaiooo 

iH CM i-H tO t- t- © G_ c-^ 


5 

£L 


rted 






x" fc» en <-i eo oc to* o t a* 


Cent of ] 


r Transpo 


Elementary 


Colored 


wt-iootoaffioocc 
rr_ cc cm oo co to^ «f cm^ cm 
t~»t^ooocoiO'-<c i >ec^i' 


M 

w 
8 


Numbe 


White 


©OtOinincT. tOmc^U 1 
OC in CM t> in tC^ OJ 0_ Ci iH 

l> cm* m* x* cm* t> as* eo* oc* •** 


Number j 




Total 
Num- 
ber 


fNi-iClX^Ot-Hf 

*l°. f i B . w . H . . 10 . . 10 

C-* CM* OC* ■«** CM* f* to* *** m* OC* 
t^XXCftO-HCMCO-tfin 








1 


eocfteotcio^-Hf-mcft 
omxeot-c-xm^t- 

Cft CM 00 tT X^ <D 




ilic Expenditures 
Transportation 




Colo 


0C* CM t> O* 'V* uo" Cfc" 0* m* 00* 
k0O^O00t>00t-O« 

CMcoco-^-^ictooccnOi 






White 


■xfOOOC-lOOOTjiCOi-OtO 

cftccec^-•fl■to»-ltD^T^• 

cn CM o_ CC CM_ i-J t> CM^ t» 

t»* •*>•" o* a>* m" o* m* m* tj«* cm" 
eomtoso— ix— <>-"-it- 
in to x^ co » C5 in oo ©_ 

r? »h ^*0J CM* 00*00* 00*^ 




3 O 

£- 




Total 


XCOCM-^'CM-^'aiCMtOCM 

**. °i **". *i H w « "l*i .°°. 

to* t-* t> eft* ©" in «sf in* o o* 
csmotoomooiCMto 

CO X^O CM 00 CM t> OC 0_ 
JC?^* CM* CM* CM* CO* CO* -*}"T>*m" 










I KAK 


mtot-xajo^cMooTj" 
^^^^■<ji»oinioioio 

Ttintot-xcfto^CMco 
•^fTf-^if^Tfinininin 

C75C7lCftCh^iCnc7lC75<7SCJ> 



Maryland State Department of Education 



re -t — •insico cc ic it, o os uc i.o 



— CM — ' t~ 00 WfflXS 0) 

— CM to -»r 01 HHOONN 



■ io — to la 



X lO 00 OS 
iO OS t» 00 io 

lo ci re -r co 



« r 



(OiflOOt- 
C0 CO 35 

re os 35 « 



KKiSlflN ■ to to to OS Nt>t- 



tC CO © T -CJ 

,h •*? io m c- tj> co cm 



iO t~ X 90 OS X to CO — 90 



o>mo«oo 



■OStOXt- HOXMfl X X iO 
■90 X OS X — iO t- OS 01 f 00l» 
CM t"~ LC © iC»ac» OS 00 



lOifl C~ CM to i 



CO C- © t— © ICOt-f)' 



cscoi cm x — uo — h^^hx aoTf oiO> to t> 
cm t- 1> © x o«»»t- mO^i^n *t -< x — m os t~ •»!« 
re — « to ^tcoftc c-xolox wt-xmio re x e~- 



ccxisxtc co io ^ io os Hionxm 



cm matNt- 
Tf ooeot-x — 

— CM OS X — 



CO CO to ^ 
iCOXOift 
tO OS IO O OS 



cm re uo © 
io t» os os cm 

X X © t- 



t-iOXCOtO 'C Tj> CM 

coxcmos© -ot» 

CO OS CM C- OS *COS 



CM 90 © t- CO LO rr OS C 



tOCOOSXCO XHiCi- iO 

O-htTXO lOXTTtOCO 

©.•*?«> "*OS^ ©tetex* 

t~ — * co — «* «* to"-«? of— "to* 



CO OS i— 1 CM tOiOCMCMiO — — IO 
CO •f to l0 X © — — CO — X i-i 

re* re* —re* co — cm" — — o'cm*— * 



iCCCO 9090X90X 



"*T CO — CM ©. — © CM CO — OS iO t~ CO 
•*■<}• OS X CO TfiOrriOOi — — CM CM CM 
WOC lOXDCX t~ re os x co 



t~ uc lo t— x os — io 
c © io © — — — co 
x © cm © c core 



U0 OS « © - 



CT. 1" CM T X — CMOSOs 
CO t- © t- CO — t^- CM ©. CO 
t'COXf X — © >.0 CM 



X 90 Tf — . 



— CO *f CO iO 



CM © CM CO 
IOOS — 90 — 

X 1-0 lO — © 



o o to oo a e x to 

©. CO Cft tC T iO U0 

cj re x cc h cs -> t- 



: cm — os o: ^ — — « 



43 



' CM Oi X iO 



1 X CM O O 



reoucrri 

X CM OS 'O ! 
© CO CM OS > 



OS — -I- tO CM 
O CM to i0 CO 
B900\»H 



CO to U0 O- OS 

co — re >-o re 
oos^^fos^to^ 
re*x"— * — lid 



t~ iO C u0 O. OS — 

OS — O. © X i^XC. 

© eo e — re © 

o" cm* re" cm* oi t-*co"re* 



- • 

• Is 



- - - u 

o o es • -S 

1 1: *f c c 
e = = *S 



« jo ; 
5 tii >>■ 



til 
111 

£££ 



156 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



lOOONN 

i "»* t»" co m 



Ol CO to H m 
CM OC "t}< CO X 
t^N CO OOH 

10 ©h o> © 



Oi HN51 

OlHTf 00 

OOtONX 



M r< f] Ol lO 

t- eo co tj- to 

!OOt-MO 



X f X 
OMOl 

t~ m m 



M 

c 

c 



oi «£> 
CM 00 



O X CO rr in 



t> x oi t^eo 

Ol to CO Ol 

to fh as o> 



to CM to OI 00 
tO CM X CO Ol TJ" x oc to 



>o«t- 
t~ eo o> 
oc in co 



■ in h x ■** 
; d cm m' t-" 
Tf oo oo 



COf woo 

Oi CM X to CM 

OiClHHOl 



rj« 00 CTl m rf 

in cm m x cm 

<OHNO i X 

in cm* oToj"o> 

© CO "<r CO CM 



t> ©co 



o co m 
x m t~ 
moi 



fO)OON 



in f— < co oc co 

CO X CO CM 

in o t-- o_o_ 
ino"w*o"w 
cm m oc«j" m 
— — 



to cm m co to 

f WXOM 
CM CM to 



oo oi m t» 
CM oi CM in 
CM to O CM CM 

OlTf WTf t> 



oi cm to o> m 
m x co cm o 



t-XXTfrf 
X CO X X ""T 



X CM T m 
tO h ^1" rt O 
CM CM_^in 

to CO X •— l o 

HH H CM 



t- O t» OS CM 
CJ m O lO if 
CO ^ CM ^ CM 



o to X O CM 
00HMOO 

co to x oc co 



HO0C51U5 

d d d d 
co -f tj< x h 



h cm eo o eo 
h eo x © m 

cm" x* m* m* m 
CM cm to ^ 

CM CM — I CO 



lOXOO'f 

d iri d cm' cm' 

MiOf ©H 



t~ i-c Tj" m 

W h CM H X 
tOoVt-'lN 

co ^ Tj- cm eo 



co cm m co to 
Hocoiitoc 

CM t> tO TT X 

dinTc'i-Tin 
cm -f m co 



m to co ^i" x 
loocaint- 
to* m* x'x'oo* 
m x oi to to 

CM 



co oo cm t» m 
co cm to m 
o co co o 



m o oo 
cm co cn 

CM —I 



X O) 

CM CO 
CM CO 



to O Ol CM 00 
tCOOlCO) 
«5 X O ©">* 



tj< co o 
to m m rf oi 
m m x x oo 



H Ol CM Ol t* 

t> .-< in to oi 
d co in •>#' b-' 
co to co 
CO N ©_h to^ 

CM tO X lO rH 

H H CM 



to to O CO 
ooocoo 

CM X to X 



X t~ CO 
X CM CI 
CM t> 

Ht-' d" 



c 



X 


m 


t> «-< tO « CO 


co oo o m o> 


OUBHlflH 


tO©CMt>t- 


CCHt- 


CO 


to 


00HMHH 


Hooinco 


CM O to t- ^ 


oo oi to o 


oi in co 


X 


T« 


x d cm' d tjI 


in* in h co eo" 


h oi in to' d 


Ol ^ CO © CO 


tO t> H 


o 


CM 


x t> O 00 CM 


oi to to ©CO 


Ht-COt-Tf 


CO CM © t- to 


co m eo 


» 


X 


in CM tO^-^CM_ 


COCOOOH 


t-^t> H CO 


cm© oj to__in 


in oi 


pi 


o" 


o'ot-'mH 


oi co h t^* oo 


CMOtTh© 


Cm'x'x'Vx* 




X 


<o 


X<OHCOeO 


t-- in c-- to cm 


CM CO t © O 


tOHT*©©> 


CM X tO 




<o 


CM CO t> HH 




CMCMHH-* 




e-jHH 




in 


jO. « 




T3 







5 s 



53 * 



5< 



isil! iliii 

^•35-5 oatS«s E&sJg 



o c 



Is* 



sill II! 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 



TABLE 101 



Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation per Pupil Transported: State 
of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 










Average 


Expenditure 


for Transportation 










All Schools 




White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


rotal State ... 


$32 


32 


$31 


18 


$33 


.78 


$30 


81 


$29 


71 


$32 


18 


$40 


51 


$38 


76 


$42 


93 


3altimore City 


149 


21 


132 


81 


241 


32 


167 


89 


147 


25 


250 


68 


106 


79 


105 


44 


138 


83 


Total Counties 


31 


91 


30 


63 


33 


.53 


30 


41 


29 


22 


31 


90 


40 


05 


37 


99 


42 


87 


Allegany 


39 


61 


33 


61 


46 


33 


39 


39 


33 


63 


45 


87 


97 


86 


21 


77 


119 


61 


Anne Arundel 


25 


70 


25 


32 


26 


13 


24 


10 


24 


05 


24 


15 


32 


69 


31 


25 


34 


20 


Baltimore. . . . 


25 


36 


21 


28 


29 


91 


24 


70 


20 


66 


29 


12 


36 


75 


30 


49 


46 


20 


Calvert 


45 


19 


37 


42 


58 


62 


53 


83 


45 


43 


66 


06 


36 


41 


30 


29 


49 


14 


Caroline 


51 


81 


51 


57 


52 


13 


49 


44 


49 


26 


49 


70 


58 


99 


59 


01 


58 


97 


Carroll 


28 


29 


27 


13 


30 


04 


27 


15 


25 


67 


29 


39 


51 


25 


59 


86 


41 


22 


Cecil 


30 


60 


29 


82 


31 


95 


28 


67 


28 


53 


28 


93 


57 


21 


51 


51 


63 


48 


Charles 


34 


46 


34 


03 


35 


12 


32 


98 


32 


12 


34 


27 


36 


14 


36 


14 


36 


15 


Dorchester. . . 


62 


88 


62 


44 


63 


54 


61 


87 


61 


90 


61 


83 


65 


23 


63 


61 


68 


02 


Frederick. . . . 


31 


99 


28 


99 


36 


38 


31 


13 


28 


15 


35 


59 


44 


17 


42 


63 


45 


88 


Garrett 


62 


51 


64 


97 


59 


84 


62 


51 


64 


97 


59 


84 














Harford 


29 


25 


29 


35 


29 


08 


29 


70 


29 


43 


30 


18 


26 


43 


28 


79 


23 


11 


Howard 


32 


57 


33 


87 


30 


88 


31 


59 


32 


19 


30 


78 


37 


13 


42 


34 


31 


30 


Kent 


51 


65 


51 


35 


52 


05 


48 


20 


47 


85 


48 


69 


59 


49 


59 


45 


59 


54 


Montgomery 


25 


63 


23 


70 


28 


26 


22 


98 


21 


64 


24 


76 


42 


83 


35 


99 


53 


95 


Pr. George's. . 


18 


97 


18 


21 


19 


68 


16 


46 


16 


38 


16 


53 


30 


09 


25 


09 


36 


37 


Queen Anne's 


50 


33 


47 


54 


54 


05 


50 


68 


46 


48 


56 


50 


49 


43 


50 


49 


48 


15 


St. Mary's. . . 


47 


96 


46 


26 


50 


46 


46 


85 


44 


54 


50 


05 


50 


37 


49 


73 


51 


41 


Somerset .... 


44 


77 


44 


78 


44 


75 


52 


27 


52 


26 


52 


29 


35 


76 


34 


97 


36 


73 


Talbot 


45 


07 


45 


17 


44 


95 


50 


36 


50 


83 


49 


85 


36 


28 


36 


55 


35 


94 


Washington . . 


30 


78 


30 


78 


30 


78 


30 


78 


30 


78 


30 


78 


30 


85 


30 


92 


30 


78 


Wicomico .... 


52 


39 


54 


41 


49 


07 


52 


48 


53 


87 


49 


94 


52 


18 


55 


99 


47 


31 


Worcester . . . 


53 


36 


51 


71 


55 


53 


57 


67 


57 


01 


58 


52 


47 


98 


45 


.12 


51 


77 



N.B.— Underlying data will be found in TABLES 99 and 100. 



158 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 102 



Number of Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public Expense : 
Number of Buses Used: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 


Total 


Number of Schools to Which 
Transportation Was Provided 


Number of Vehicles 




Schools for White Pupils 


Schools 


Buses Owned by 


Private 


MumLf>r 


Total 








for 






Cars and 




of 






Com- 




Colored 






Station 




Schools 




Ele- 


bined 


High 


Pupils 




Con- 


Wagons 








mcntary 


Vlr>m Xr 

rjK*m. at 


School 




County 


tractors 








Only 


High 


Only 










i (ii iii otave .... 


927 


690 


376 


60 


82 


172 


403 


1,321 


97 


Baltimore City . 


160 


6 


3 


1 




2 




15 




Total Counties . 


767 


684 


373 


59 


82 


170 


403 


1,306 


97 


Allegany 


34 


30 


19 


4 


5 


2 




93 


11 


Anne ArundeU 


63 


56 


32 




7 


17 




108 


*1 


Baltimore. . . . 


74 


69 


43 


2 


11 


13 


58 


153 


8 


Calvert 


16 


15 


6 




1 


8 




37 


6 


Caroline 


13 


12 


3 


5 




4 




42 




Carroll 


20 


20 


9 


7 


2 


2 


7 


56 


*4 


Cecil 


24 


23 


12 


5 


3 


3 


1 


55 


3 


Charles 


20 


20 


2 


4 


1 


13 




54 


11 


Dorchester. . . 


30 


28 


12 


3 


3 


10 


1 


53 


3 


Frederick. . . 


38 


36 


21 


5 


3 


7 


1 18 


81 


*2 


Garrett 


31 


26 


24 




2 




2 


77 


tio 


Harford 


24 


23 


17 


i 


3 


2 


31 


72 


2 


Howard 


18 


17 


5 


4 


1 


7 




45 




Kent 


16 


16 


7 




2 


6 




35 


1 


Montgomery . 


83 


66 


45 


2 


11 


8 


126 






Pr. George's. . 


92 


68 


37 


1 


12 


18 


118 


31 




Queen Anne's 


23 


22 


11 




3 


8 




32 


15 


St. Mary's . 


18 


18 


8 




2 


7 




43 


13 


Somerset ... 


21 


19 


5 


3 


2 


9 




43 


t 


Talbot 


21 


21 


9 




2 


10 


3 


31 


1 


Washington . 


45 


i 40 


30 


4 


5 


1 


38 


50 


*3 


Wicomico 
Worcester 


26 


. 22 


10 


3 


1 


8 




58 


3 


17 


17 


6 


4 




7 




57 


1 



* Each asterisk denotes one county-owned station wagon, 
t Excludes one horse in Garrett and one boat in Somerset. 

X Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



TABLE 103 — Federal Vocational Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland: 

1953-54 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


1954 
Allotment 


1954 
Expenditures 


Balance 
June 30, 1954 


Total 


$320,565.04 

89,730.19 
138,283.10 
68,266.98 
15,630.93 
8,653.84 


$304,835.47 

88,658.28 
123,625.44 
68,266.98 
15,630.93 
8,653.84 


$15,729.57 

1,071.91 
14,657.66 


Home Economics 


Teacher Training and Supervision . . . 
Distributive Education 









TABLE 104- 



■Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 
1953-54 



Type of 
Vocational Program 



Total Expended in Maryland . . . 

Instruction in Counties: 

Day Schools— White 

Colored 

Adult Education— White 

Colored .... 

Instruction in Baltimore City: 

Day Schools— White 

Colored 

Adult Education— White 

Colored .... 
Co-operative and Continuation 
Supervision 

Instruction by the University of 
Maryland: 

Mining 

Volunteer Firemen 

Teacher Training and Guidance 

State Administration and Super- 
vision 

Nursing Aide Instruction 



All 
Subjects 



$304,835.47 



119,032.45 
31,136.94 
34,895.50 
3,423.50 



25,625.90 
18,632.99 
16,981.25 
6,028.85 
7,485.59 



2,196.00 
4,220.00 
4,219.38 



29,853.37 
1,103.75 



Agri- 
culture 



$93,271.20 



69,006.19 
13,592.79 
1,054.00 
260.00 



1,359.38 
7,998.84 



Trades and 
Industry 



$127,206.76 



26,673.49 
9,177.50 
14,697.50 



25,625.90 
18,632.99 
14,228.33 
2,510.88 



2,196.00 
4,220.00 



,140.42 
,103.75 



Home 
Economics 



$75,703.67 



22,364.52 
8,366.65 

18,964.00 
3,163.50 



2,752.92 
3,517.97 



2,860.00 



13,714.11 



Distributive 
Education 



$8,653.84 
988.25 

180.66 



7,485.59 



160 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



— iO 

© Cl 

© 06 



5 



0) 00 i M 

■2 3 2L « II 
^ W OT ^ 



O B 



S S§8 



02 cm r- 



«o cm < 
a w ■ 
cm cm ■ 



J. jS 



s s 

« CO 



O CO PC cc 

— •>r — • v 

cJ -r ri* 

si sr 





e» 
«• 


oi 


ei 




0" 




•0 

r- 


■a 
r- 


r» 








d 
a» 


,919. 


o» : 






U 


•» 




• 







C B 
b CU 

B a 



05 ox 

OB © C) 



so ce r- -r 
r~ « r» uc 

«r o: cc — 



ei — ci 

os ao 



• © c x © O < 
> © CM M cc © I 



> © S3 © 3 © cc © 



CM -cr — — r~ CO 



© wo © ac 
iqifieio CO 

— CM* CM* 



22s 

to as to t^eoc 
30 10 ac r»«w5 



c s 



«r ions 



sc © r~ ac ao 
r~ us oc © <M 
ac to its cm ic 
t-» CO oc © 
— CM CO 



OC — © CM CO 

cc — ci cc 
— r>. r-- ao ac 



r- — cm 00 cc cm t- 

cc ac — ac us ac cm cc 

-t -r ac 1/5 ai uc ac 

cc © © wi cc cc cj lc 




ac >* rr. © »c — cs r-~ © ac cm ce «?■ 

h. 'T C. K U3 IQ CD © "J" ©. CM irt 

cm ci -»r cm ©' — -r "£ t» -r -r cm «— 

r~ — ~ ~. — e ci m n c c -rm 



uo oc -r c: 



CM — — • 



© CC OS CM OC 



-3 2c^1 



— — © 



OC OC — CM 1^ — X CM ^ CM 
© CM OS U3 — XlOM'TO 
CO — CM CO CC -° t~-" oi t-^ ©" 
CO — CC © 
-MOXN © © U3 CC CM 



■ -»r os cc cm 
. iC — f~ CO 
' CM m tO — 



EG Ca X cm t - OOOC CO 

© ac -r cm cc --rifl 

r-^ cm ac ac cc cst^r^ 

n m u; n c © © t~ 

sr. ir: © cm os — cm cm 



•a 

- a 

*2 



! »•£ £ 1: 1: 

■ -p. a> eo .O es 



e b 



c« u-C © u 

O O O Q fa 



til 



I 90 C 

i S 3 

: = s 



Maryland State Departmknt of Education 



161 



03 O 

II 



u 

X 

S 

2 



o o o 
ooo 
woo 
t-oco 



m co co 
co m co 



-•gas 

•g rt » bp 



[> C~ CO OC C~ X t> CO 

t-co to co t> x co 
t-iom co co co co 



•ot- 
;co'eo' 



c co 

iC CO 



CO • t}< 

• in 

co ; co 



t~ CO 
CO^h 



.toco 

OS lO 



•cow 

: to co 

■<j< X 

x co 



3 53 *~ a boo 
Eh a> -- o 53 3 



ioxt~c~eo 
~. te to t- co 



OCirtCl^f 

co o Oi 

00 t-^ CO Tjl co' 

toeowcoco 
co co o tow 

CO 1-4 



—i©t> 

co co io 



t~ CO 1-H 

t-Hia 
o ■>* io 



.-nO> 
.05 x 
to c- 



. 5 « 



hill 

= = - - - 

<<pQOO 



E 

c 

_ i- - tx 

a> o d • *j 

OS rt O 4) o 



8 

8 c * 2 "£ 

c c£ 



■SgS 

£££ 



162 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 107— Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland: 1953-54 



County 


Expenditures for Salaries 


Per Cent op- 
Salaries 


Expendi- 
tures for 
Purposes 

Other 

than 
Salaries 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Fed- 
eral 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Grand Total 


$545,896.79 


$61,329.10 


$74,000.00 


$410,575.69 


11.2 


13.6 


75.2 


$49,138.73 


$46,050.57 


WHITE 


Total State 

Baltimore City 


$380,168.79 

278,669.75 

101,499.04 

8,196.00 
2,183.00 
22,822.21 
655.12 
445.50 

1,391.00 
1,148.00 

941.00 
1,495.00 

477.00 

1,264.25 
9,352.00 
75.00 
661.00 
24,838.00 

11,496.46 

759.00 


$51,876.75 

16,981.25 

34,895.50 

3,068.50 
360.00 
10,722.50 
99.00 


$61,442.21 

12,200.00 

49,242.21 

4,612.50 
1,680.50 
9,911.58 
493.00 
445.50 

855.00 
324.00 
831.00 
1,082.50 
477.00 

1,108.25 
6,181.00 

75.00 
583.00 
7,866.38 

5,112.00 
759.00 


$266,849.83 

249,488.50 

17,361.33 

515.00 
142.50 
2,188.13 
63.12 


13.6 

6.1 

34.4 

37.4 
16.5 
47.0 
15.1 

17.1 
64.6 
11.7 
27.6 

12.3 
7.6 

ii'.s 

29.6 
40.5 

29.7 

58.7 
15.6 
15.2 


16.2 
4.4 

48.5 

56.3 
77.0 
43.4 
75.3 
100.0 

61.5 
28.2 
88.3 
72.4 
100.0 

87.7 
66.1 
100.0 
88.2 
31.7 

44.5 
100.0 

100.0 
69.7 

39.6 
77.5 
84.8 


70.2 

89.5 

17.1 

6.3 
6.5 
9.6 
9.6 

21.4 
7.2 

26.3 

38.7 
15.0 

0.6 

1.7 
6.9 


$31,417.79 

21,925.92 

9,491.87 

143.13 
74.00 
4,585.24 
14.95 
138.00 

116.00 
115.02 


$46,050.57 


Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


46,050.57 

2,327.66 
1,007.00 
7,291.00 




80.00 

2,183.31 
404.10 


Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 


237.50 
742.00 
110.00 
412.50 


298.50 
82.00 


Dorchester 




52.50 


54.17 
46.00 






Garrett 


156.00 
712.00 






Harford 


2,459.00 




1,187.72 


Howard 




Kent 


78.00 
7,363.00 

4,654.50 




41.00 
1,411.03 

1,688.29 


286.00 
19,008.85 

6,203.25 


Montgomery 

Prince George's .... 
Queen Anne's 


9,608.62 
1,729.96 


St. Mary's 










Somerset 


227.50 
944.00 

9,309.50 
1,585.00 
1,233.50 




227.50 
658.50 

3,685.50 
1,227.50 
1,046.00 








Talbot 


280.00 

5,465.00 
247.50 
187.50 


5.50 

159.00 
110.00 




192.00 

5,527.51 
252.00 


Washington 

Worcester 


989.82 
122.89 










COLORED 


Total State 


$165,728.00 
157,546.71 
8,181.29 


$9,452.35 
6,028.85 
3,423.50 


$12,557.79 
7,800.00 
4,757.79 


$143,717.86 
143,717.86 


5.7 
3.8 
41.8 

17.2 
45.4 
69.4 

36.6 
35.3 

100.0 

32.9 

48.9 

69.8 
59.6 
60.6 


7.6 
5.0 
58.2 

82.8 
54.6 
30.6 

63.4 
64.7 

100.6 

67.1 

51 .1 

30.2 
40.4 
39.4 


86.7 
91.2 


$17,720.94 
17,720.94 




Baltimore City 




Total Counties 




Allegany 








Anne Arundel 


1,135.50 
1,860.79 
359.00 


195.00 
844.50 
249.00 


940.50 
1,016.29 
110.00 








Baltimore 








Calvert 








Caroline 








Carroll 














Cecil 














Charles 


745.50 
374.00 


273.00 
132.00 


472.50 
242.00 








Dorchester 








Frederick 








Garrett 














Harford 


493.50 
121.00 




493.50 










121.00 








Kent 










Montgomery 














Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 


1,002.00 


330.00 


672.00 




























Somerset 


226.00 


110.50 


115.50 








Talbot 








Washington 


516.00 
831.00 
517.00 


360.00 
495.00 
313.50 


156.00 
336.00 
203.50 








Wicomico 








Worcester 

















Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 108 — Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment 
by Subject: State of Maryland: 1953-54 



County 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Grand Total 


988 


25,882 


308 


4,319 


2,379 


5,736 


13,140 





WHITE ADULTS 



TYifil Ktrtta 


783 


20 818 


258 


3 197 


2 142 


4 540 


10 681 


Baltimore City 


377 


9,135 




797 


587 


1,848 


5,903 




406 


11 683 


258 


2 400 


1 555 


2 692 


4 778 


Allegany 


35 


817 


30 


315 


21 


282 


169 


Anne Arundel .... 


13 


315 






21 


93 


201 


Baltimore 


98 


2,240 




392 


565 


533 


750 


Calvert 


5 


149 




22 




54 


73 


Caroline 


2 


41 










41 


Carroll 


4 


142 






28 


33 


81 


Cecil 


6 


166 






35 


114 


17 


Charles 


4 


181 




29 




52 


100 


Dorchester 


10 


257 


70 






67 


120 


Frederick 


4 


99 








30 


69 


Garrett 


10 


172 


42 






49 


81 




29 


777 


31 




67 


168 


511 


Howard 




17 










17 


Kent 


7 


143 


15 






' 44 


84 


Montgomery 


75 


2,597 




915 


' 52 


171 


1,459 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


34 


1,526 




585 


51 


466 


424 


4 


61 








34 


27 


St. Mary's 
















Somerset 




39 








39 




Talbot 


7 


188 


40 


48 




19 


81 


Washington 


41 


1,284 


30 


51 


683 


210 


310 


Wicomico 


9 


161 




17 




60 


84 


Worcester 


7 


311 




26 


32 


174 


79 


COLORED ADULTS 


Total State 


205 


5,064 


50 


1,122 


237 


1,196 


2,459 


Baltimore City 


159 


4,015 




740 


237 


895 


2,143 


Total Counties 


46 


1,049 


50 


382 




301 


316 


















Anne Arundel .... 


6 


i39 




20 




44 


75 


Baltimore 


9 


143 




50 




48 


45 


Calvert 


3 


114 


20 


53 






41 


Caroline 
















Carroll 
















Cecil 
















Charles 


' ' 2 


66 




29 




37 




Dorchester 


3 


43 




14 




16 


13 


Frederick 
















Garrett 
















Harford 


' ' 2 


59 










59 


Howard 


2 


32 


16 


16 








Kent 
































Prince George's . . 


6 


165 




56 




109 




Queen Anne's. . . . 


































' ' 2 


* '45 




18 






27 


Talbot 
















Washington 


2 


39 




24 




15 




Wicomico 


4 


92 




61 






si 


Worcester 


5 


112 




41 




32 


25 



164 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 109— Adult Education Program: Title of Courses Offered : Counties 

of Maryland: 1953-54 



Title of Course 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Farm Mechanics 

Farm Shop 

Horse Management 

Total 

Distributive Occupation 

Retail Selling 

Salesmanship 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Cooking 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Home Furnishing and Decorating. . 

Millinery 

Slip Covers 

Total 

Trades and Industry 

Art-Enameling on Copper 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Electric Arc and Acetylene Welding 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Industrial Safety 

Labor Management Relations 

Machine Shop 

Mechanical Drawing 

Plastics 

Precision Instrument 

Radio and Television 

Sheet Metal Pattern Development. 

Shop Math 

Stationary Engineering 

Wood Shop 

Total 



Number 
of Classes 



17 



114 



Title of Course 



Business Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business Education 

Shorthand 

Typing 



Total 



General 

Advertising 

Americanization 

Art 

Arts and Crafts 

Care of Mentally Retarded Children 

Ceramics 

Dramatics 

Driver Education 

Elementary Subjects 

English 

Furniture Repair and Refinishing. . 

High School Certificate Exam 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Household Furnishings 

Industrial Arts 

Jewelry and Gem Cutting 

Law 

Leadership Training 

Lip Reading 

Mathematics 

Modern Foreign Languages 

Music — Instrumental and Vocal . . . 

Photography 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Public Speaking 

Real Estate 

Recreation 

Science 

Shop 

Social Studies 

Woodwork and Metalcraft 



Total . 



Number 
of Classes 



Maryland State Department ok Education 



165 



TABLE 110— Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: Baltimore City: 

1953 and 1954 



Type of Class 



Total 

Americanization 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Commercial (Distributive Education) 
Vocational: 

Industrial 

Home Economics 

Parent Education 

Industrial Training (General) 

Informal Program (Noncredit) 

Speech and Lip Reading Classes 

Vocational Education ( Veterans) 

Foremanship and Apprentice Training. . . 

Total Number of Principals and Teachers 



Net Roll, February 



White 



1953 



9,826 


10,232 


693 


670 


192 


291 


1,058 


1,074 


1,694 


1,848 


533 


587 


581 


797 


1,747 


1,492 


352 


385 


1,868 


1,991 


32 


149 


207 


927 


890 


366 


377 



1954 



Colored 



1953 


1954 


3,665 


4,357 


42i 


559 


574 


906 


702 


895 


290 


237 


713 


740 


594 


595 


21 


28 




55 


350 


307 




35 


148 


159 



TABLE 111 

Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher Training in Vocational 
Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Source of Expenditure* 



Total 

State and University Funds 
Federal Funds 



State Administration and Super- 
vision 

State Funds 

Federal Funds 



Teacher Training 

University of Md. Funds 
Federal Funds 



Type of Vocational Program 



Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


$34,047.71 
34,072.75 


$9,333.22 
9,358.22 


$8,140.41 
8,140.42 


$16,574.08 
16,574.11 




29,828.33 
29,853.37 


7,973.84 
7,998.84 


8,140.41 
8,140.42 


13,714.08 
13,714.11 




4,219.38 


1,359.38 
1,359.38 




2,860.00 
2,860.00 




4,219.38 











166 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



to © t- "f rf t- ' 



lO -I" to —i m CM ">* m 

W . °°» *H **„ "H * ""1 
•H OC CM CO |H -*f l-T t-* 

eo ec in x^ iH in t> 
*** to* t-~ f-* t- oc x* oc 



m co — -i «~i 
cooooo 



«-h CO "<f © m x 

•I tO Tf l- 

f cm © ^ CO 



■ © to rj. CM CM 
IOOOOOO 



TfOMTTHt-MM 
COCOCO©COtOmCM 
CM_ CO t- Cft 1-4 CO CO CM 
in* -1* ©* l-T ©* t- Tf ©* 
X © N O to t> W in 



X CM CM ^ 

o o o o 



O to EC i.O C © 
Wt- O t- CM 

loeooo b- to t- 



c m o to © CO CO CO 
m to as t~ o io 
o t- o_ eft t> to_ q t- 

i-<* CM* ©* m" [-* o* oc 

in x ifl oo eft ih q 

US to" t> X* ©* r-T Tf to* 



©x©m©©©to 

©'■^©COf'-H^t'- 
CM* CO* <-* CM *r i-T CO* ©* 

©©■**to©r-<cM© 

(Mt-HTf CCN0CO0 



Per Cent 
of Total 
Average 
Number 
Belonging 
in State 
Partici- 
pating 
in Program 


OCJHOBHIO 
CM©©— 'CM^O^ 

cmcmcococOcococo 


Average 
Daily 
Partici- 
pation 


CMcomi-ixxm© 

OhONhOCOCiO 

°c ©.■^cq.cq.'** in ©_ 

O* CM* O* X* X* CM* CJ5* CM* 

toxoscftocMeom 


Per Cent 
of Total 
Schools 
in State 
Partici- 
pating 
in Program 


CM rj< CM CO O O N m 

Tfcocr>CMTj<t-xcM 
■tiomtotototoc^ 


Number of 
Approved 
Schools 
Partici- 
pating 
in Program 


o co m o t> to cm 

tNXOH CMCOt- 

fiomtototctoto 



at f- 

S I g 
=" 6 



tOt>X©©>-iCMCO 
~ - . T. 35 ~. 7! © ~. 



x to cm r- 
o to co i-i o 

© C 1 C 1 C ) CO 



o x m x © 
CMomeoto 
to oo t - en 
t- t~-*m"in*i/5 

tC tC CM O 



-r ^ cr. cc "O 
cm e- j «-> «-> t 



ci to co © © 
in co in x co 
x x cr. to ci 



•H CM < 



■O • < «-H CO CM - O • 



t-*in 



m cm to i 



> © -f CM t- to t> O i 



Of OIXX LC^OMf 

XmCMXTT t-HOft 

wx^f-osTf ^ f w© tq_ 

«* ootoeJt- t-*t-*CM*co"in* 

t~ CO iO 51 h CM t~ CO t~ © 

x c- m cm mco—icMt^ 



©© CM/* 
CO* C I fc** 

co co os x o 

CM ©CM X 



i cm m co t> cm m in 



t- to to X © 
cm © © ineo 
to* ■** m* cm" in 

CJiOONH 



© x m 

t- © 

o:ih 



to 
t- 
Tj« 


X 

to 

eq_ 


00 

o 


c- o x m© 
m hoi cm t> 


OKinoeo 
as Tj< to tq_ 


X CO U< C5 to 
X c^j to t> © 


©©©©to 
cm © cm © -<r 
to x © © m 


co © © 

to CM © 
CM ©/>£>_ 


,899, 


in* 

CO 

«o^ 


,264, 


a5*co*co*to"o* 

OlOt-OOt- 

o\in t> ^ cm 


CM*c*r-*cr"'-<* 

r-l tO OS C5 © 


to*t-*©*m*to* 
x © to o in 

CM CM^ ©_ 


,378, 
179 
123| 
162, 
158, 


cSocoo 
m co co 
cm m CM 


CM 




o 

CM 


•HrHOJ 




CM* 


co 





© m to x to »h i 



© CO © OJ 



©m©toto ■«l , to■<J"■^ , © ©mcMCMto 

© f CM © CO in-^fCMCMf TfCM©-*"-^ 

to to ©x to t> X CM X CO t>©©to© 



C^©i-HCMCM CMt-f 

xxt>©to t~t>eo 

LO C t- © © X CM <* 



i t> CM X © r-i 



©eo©t>co ©CM©t>eo mxx<-i, 



s s 

5" B a3 



- ^ - <3<CQUCJ 

H as H 



E 
P. 

"Sort 
a a o v° 



8g|§J S| 



•c.S 

rt 

m « 



~ o 



rt rt 



> > 

i— u 

C CJ 



S 2 



73 73 
C C 

rt rt 
tn in 
o ■- 

33 



> > 



0> 0) 

o o 



CM -I 

1 sl 

a a a 

3^ 
I I I 

; ; 

a a a, 
>>>%>>, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



I! 



Jl 



Si 



4 



I! 



II 



Hi 
IP 



mmi 
immi 

££2SS2Sg 
23S£S;£Jgg 

SSSiSSiS 

piiiin 

mmmm 

PISIIJI 

IlllllJJ. 

Hi 



3 £ S S^Sr:^ SSSSS SS5 

1 5 1 sms; isiga am mm m 



2 H ^ g^^SS £^g£S 232*3 



Hi iiiiq k ss si ;r 



§ 3 83 232SS3 gESZS 2£2£2 =gS 



2 1 1 iijii mm mm mm m 

§88 ° = £~~ oc-r--« ^o-j, c-.-o.^.- s eo« 



S §g 5 fcSSSSS sssssss 

Hi mm mm mm mm m 

I a i 



**5 U5 2 < 



■8 £?' 



g £ s ^gssis sssss sssss SK2 

s i g iiiii iMii mM mm m 

§ s i SBS*"* 



;£2?;S S38°°|j ^Z2 = 2 §32 



S S § 3SSS2 = £3££ 32gKg SSSSS 3P-3 

Hi mm mm mm mm m 

1 3.3 lis"- s^sss sssss gssss gss 



§ S g SSSSS ££2SS ££2£§ 

1 1; i mm mm Ami mm m 

I £ I 338" gsssi gssss gss 



SS 5 & S3§22 33333 SSS 

i i i mM mm mm m 

III ^SS" 51 2£3< c | gS^SS ggS? 

u 



8 S 2S2£S SSSSSS SSS 

i i A iMM mm mm mm m 

|g| SS^" 00 SS^SSS ° 5 = 2^g g»^*^ «s N 



5 § S3 ^SSS SSg5E:S 



§ I llgli iPII. niiSI Giil 

1 S 1 5 SS!5 1 s a ss l 5 SS - §83 



1 . 



§ S 2 SS^gi? S^^^S S-S 

§ s §; piii; mii mm mm m 

lis Sliss sg^sl sigsf fssss 2 g § 
s - " 



i 1 j ll i! ii I 

^ x ^ 



168 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



Mi 



< m 



DO 

s 1 



Si 
3 
- 

C 

CS 



K 


,728 


o 


■ t- oo 


00 


as 


o 
to 


o 


in* 


!»-*•*" 

. eo 


M 


cc 







a. as 

«H O 

m o 



t- t- TJ< CO T» 

co c^oj to^in 
©'cm*-*-** 
co —i i-i 

CM 



co eo as m 

© I- tO 



OS 00 
CI CO 



i- co t~ © 
oo m oeo 

OS CO © 
■ O X t~ 



x »r cm — > 
co a> ■«* to 



m o> 

CHO ift (C 1/5 
O . eC . 0C . 0C . e0 . 
IO0J Oft t- 00 
lO — ' fc» 
-< lO CM 



.-. a. ic c j ^ 

o t~ "5 ® 
Tft-^w aT oo* 



©OS CO 

22 *"? 



c 

CS 


00 
CM 


B0 
00 

to 


as to t- x to 

OTCO XtO 
tO t- to tO CM 


U3HX115U3 

to to CM m CO 
t>«J t^CJCO 


I- t - X X 

as to to oh co 


CO ~ 

X X 

m x 


ia a. 
in ■«»• to 
m Okco 


O O lO 
OXO 

CM t- to 


677, 


027, 


©* 
m 
CD 


604, 

10, 

3, 


co to >o x t- 
— •«*• 


as t- co 01 >* 
»-ioo^* co 


,831, 
29 


t- to 

MM 


130, 
167 

82Si 


w 

N 


to 


ctT 


— ^. 










CM 



CM 




f- 


1- 1- _ ~. i~ 

CO t~ —< CM tO 


t- 

in 


00 


as 
to 






,896, 


«-* tt in oT 
"* x to 

cm »h 


to 




CO* 

</» 









hi-Hocie 

CM — 1 X -h 

iflOfHOC 



• m co cm x 

• o to_ 
1 co* in in as" 
. -*r ~ ^ 

co ci 



x x S 00 
co co ci m 



to to as 



a- us to ~r 
as in co 
as m in 
•*r 0? to" e- 
to X 

CM — tO 



X CO X CO US 

— rr 1 — ~ 

x*a5*as"eo"co" 
t}< m — ' to to 

— 1 CM X CO 



CM OS "3 "3 to 

to t - as us 

l^VI'i-Toft'*"' 

~+ cm m x x 
C CI c~ 



x x co m 
©t-eot-t- 

as" to" t-" cm c- 
x — as to 
01 cm CM 
cm" 



t-coco 
coco 

O CM 



Oi 

co 

CM 


W 


X 

to 

DO 


to to co to 
eo cm t- x as 
B I x 


I'.CEr.uJ 

eo m cm 
m x in m 


c j eo *BTf 00 
:n:c. y- 
co 00 cause* 


x a- t- to ■* 
x m as m t~ 


to — CO 

mm-* 
CM x_x 


OO 
t- 


CM* 
X 
t- 


in* 
as 
« 


to*Tf*^rx*as* 
to m 

CO CO 


as* cm*—" to" x* 
■0" X t- to 
-h eo as eo 


»-*■«** to" m* -<* 
t-H to to as 

CO^** x^ 


in*t-*t-"eo*t>* 
meo as to 
to^co^ CM 


t-*oot-* 
eotocM 

© CM 


B0 
CM 




00 


«-*•** 




l-J CM 


CM* 





«H CO 

as* "** 



OS0CHt-H 

m to x co 

co" as" cm*-*" cm" 

m x cm 

CM CM 



C~- X t- 

m m t- m 

—c "-i«co 

as* CM* CM* X* 



:i"?t««h -co co 
a. o 09 i— >ot- 
x l.o cj in t> 'Ot> 



coco ox 
co co co 

«-i CM — 



.co as 
o co 



CO tO X CM'* t-i 

cm x as t> xeo 

t> CM_tO^(>C« 

x* t-"m*to*co* 

t> X C5C0 

eo* co* as* 



to t> cm m o 
osooHiflio 
x-* oc_a>"* 
eo"x*t>*x*o* 
xasmcoco 
cm -"^ as 



0> CO CO ■* y-t 
y-> to — 1 CM CM 

c -^'~'. c .x.as. 

to" t}«*~- f* CM 

Ot-HO» 

cm m eo >— 1 © 



as to x c- co to x lo 

t-rtXXffl 10 cm t~ 

eo* - *" as* 1-* to" t~*eo*to* 

—icoasinas toco^ 

OCM^ «H-^< t> 



co as t> to 

X_X^t0^t> 09 
0*m* 09*00 CM* 

as co to 



o m m m 
x^n in t> 00 
-^*CM*co"eo"as* 
x m cm eo eo 
cm x m 



CM o ^ cm m 
m cm to o m 
<eco t-^oj tc 
r-reo*eo*o*CM* 

CM CM tO —1 CM 



oascMinTj> toi-<x 

as-^moeo mco-* 

00»0»HOCO ■^^'^ 

as*x*o*cM*^* t-"to"'so" 

0(00X05 toeom 

uoeomcMto ^•fx 



bo • 
* B S 
S C ai 

<<cc 



CC CCCQfc 



. o 

0) O efl _ 

S 3 o £ © 



£f*c 

si|i| 



£8| 

J3 .Si o 



■aj 



OT3 

E^ 



T3 s 

*° E 



i-2 

13 



Maryland State Department of Education 169 



TABLE 115 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation as of 

June 30, 1954 





School 


Bonded Indebtedness 


1953 Assessed 


Assessed 


Per 


Cent 




as 


of June 30, 1954 


Valuation 


Valuation per 


School 


Bonded 


County 








Taxable at 


Dollar of 


Indebtedness 










Full Rate for 


School Bonded 


Is of Assessed 




l otai 


County Bonds 


State Loan* 


County 


Indebtedness 


Valuation 








Purposes 








Total State 


$211,422,675 


$lol,£ol,o to 


KCi 1 A A QQQ 


$5,450,843,313 


$26 


3 


9 


DnlfimAca ( 'if >■ r 


A £ 1 A EC f\f\f\ 


46,145,000 




+0 OOfC AQQ QCC1 


48 


2 


1 




165,277,675 


115,136,676 


50,140,999 


3,225,403,462 


19 


5 


1 


Allegany 


4,096,000 


2,906,000 


1,190,000 


156,945,865 


38 


2 


6 


Anne Arundel 


14,317,798 


10,886,000 


3,431,798 


J183,491,851 


13 


7 


8 


Baltimore 


48,599,442 


33,389,000 


15,210,442 


J832.097.444 


17 


5 


8 


Calvert 


1,400,282 


820,000 


580,282 


14,647,843 


10 


9 


6 


Caroline 


578,444 


40,000 


538,444 


25,639,442 


44 


2 


3 


Carroll 


1,350,000 


1,100,000 


250,000 


80,547,841 


60 




7 


Cecil 


2,520,361 


2,130,000 


390,361 


J69,720,205 


28 


3 


6 




1,630,808 


634,000 


996,808 


J24.651.480 


15 


6 


6 




3,576,740 


2,670,740 


906,000 


55,698,460 


15 


6 


4 


Frederick 


1,729,365 


318,000 


1,411,365 


J114.360.685 


63 


1 


6 


Garrett 


1,675,000 


1,125,000 


550,000 


28,654,114 


17 


5 


8 


Harford 


6,429,519 


5,194,500 


1,235,019 


J118.759.553 


18 


5 


4 


Howard 


2,406,600 


1,191,083 


1,215,517 


36,508,700 


15 


6 


6 


Kent 


1,261,015 


700,000 


561,015 


25,009,985 


20 


5 







34,960,667 


26,655,353 


8,305,314 


J657.248.720 


19 


5 


3 




24,967,064 


18,138,000 


6,829,064 


J386.623.775 


15 


6 


5 


Queen Anne's 


1,180,555 


548,000 


632,555 


29,909,221 


25 


3 


9 


St. Mary's 


771,673 




771,673 


25,541,849 


33 


3 





Somerset 


958,233 


2,000 


956,233 


21,606,526 


23 


4 


4 


Talbot 


1,571,187 


500,000 


1,071,187 


39,163,905 


25 


4 





Washington 


1,706,000 


174,000 


1,532,000 


163,357,171 


96 


1 





Wicomico 


6,350,922 


4,775,000 


1,575,922 


82,724,115 


13 


7 


7 


Worcester 


1,240,000 


1,240,000 




52,494,712 


42 


2 


4 

















* General School Construction Loan. 

t Includes sinking fund balance of $2,332,488.22. 

t Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



170 



Kk;hty-Ek;hth Annual Repokt 



TABLE 116 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and 

Belonging: 1953-54 



Interest Payments per Pupil 



County 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 



Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles . . . 
Dorchester. 
Frederick . . 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 



Total State $499.98 

Baltimore City | 343 .34 

Total Counties 572.95 



264.14 

586.73 
929.39 
450.13 
150.75 

155.21 
355.01 
285.90 
688.96 
150.41 



Interest 
Payments 



$9.93 
6.38 
11.59 

6.09 
11 .73 
19.09 
12.09 

2.69 

2.57 
5.47 
5.94 
14.93 



County 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 



$375.59 
542.94 
480.67 
451.73 
818.54 

594.06 
385.45 
198.95 
246.21 
419.62 

108.20 
857.99 
273.22 



* Includes Ceneral School Construction Loan. 



TABLE 117 



Value of Public School Property per Pupil : State of Maryland : 1923-1954 



Year 


Value of School Property* 


Value per Pupil 
















Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


1923 


$22,236,638 


$10,440,008 


$11,796,630 


$87 


$100 


$77 


1928 


51,765,517 


32,770,847 


18,994,670 


191 


291 


120 


1933 


66,030,676 


40,679,936 


25,350,740 


225 


335 


147 


1938 


81,336,202 


49,633,230 


31,702,972 


277 


410 


184 


1943 


89,953,989 


50,463,694 


39,490,295 


300 


430 


217 


1945 


89,660,481 


49,726,430 


39,934,051 


303 


437 


219 


1946 


94,935,593 


49,726,430 


45,209,163 


320 


442 


245 


1947 


96,879,433 


49,800,279 


47,079,154 


322 


440 


251 


1948 


104,461,410 


50,639,234 


53,822,176 


338 


437 


278 


1949 


120,474,231 


50,258,400 


70,215,831 


373 


428 


342 


1950 


147,205,363 


50,659,159 


96,546,204 


429 


417 


435 


1951 


179,725,597 


50,659,159 


129,066,438 


490 


405 


533 


1952 


205,918.642 


50,647,823 


155,270,819 


533 


394 


603 


1953 


255,771,447 


61,881,725 


193,889,722 


619 


455 


699 


1954f 


309,979,448 


83,299,575 


226,679,873 


733 


620 


786 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con- 
struction or no longer in use. 

t See footnotes on page 171, TABLE 118. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLE 118 



Value* of Maryland School Property per Pupil Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



County 


All Schools 


Schools for White 
Pupils 


Schools for Colored 
Pupils 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total State 


$d09, 979, 448 


$733 


05 


$262,932,012 


$786 


21 


$47,047,436 


$532 


00 




83,299,575 


619 


79 


61,950,257 


743 


16 


21,349,318 


418 


29 


Total Counties 


226,679,873 


785 


81 


200,981,755 


800 


50 


25,698,118 


687 


22 


All ptTfi n v 


13,207,501 


851 


71 


13,045,401 


856 


81 


162,100 


575 


84 




20,404,278 


836 


14 


16,981,875 


865 


00 


3,422,403 


717 


41 


Baltimore 


41,401,456 


791 


74 


39,563,206 


814 


60 


1,838,250 


493 


61 


Calvert 


2,007,900 


645 


46 


1,140,500 


736 


85 


867,400 


654 


96 


Caroline 


2,443,204 


636 


71 


2,021,925 


681 


33 


421,279 


484 


45 


Carroll 


5,936,900 


682 


57 


5,638,700 


683 


06 


298,200 


673 


29 


Cecil 


5,383,400 


758 


29 


5,137,700 


774 


47 


245,700 


527 


71 


Charles 


5,390,809 


945 


06 


3,822,634 


1,210 


.35 


1,568,175 


615 


96 


Dorchester 


3,808,813 


733 


66 


2,624,000 


736 


93 


1,184,813 


726 


52 


Frederick 


6,791,305 


590 


69 


6,214,655 


596 


01 


576,650 


538 


82 


Garrett 


1,847,300 


414 


22 


1,847,300 


414 


22 








Harford 


11,750,492 


992 


26 


10,003,700 


944 


32 


1,746,792 


1,399 


00 


Howard 


2,808,500 


560 


95 


2,590,700 


640 


50 


217,800 


226 


43 


Kent 


2,189,200 


784 


24 


1,657,100 


837 


17 


532,100 


655 


21 


Montgomery 


37,347,774 


874 


43 


35,181,053 


879 


89 


2,166,721 


794 


28 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


31,405,825 


747 


26 


27,150,805 


747 


83 


4,255,020 


743 


61 


2,359,489 


770 


37 


1,916,239 


863 


56 


443,250 


525 


30 


St. Mary's 


1,965,515 


506 


73 


1,632,500 


601 


49 


333,015 


285 


92 


Somerset 


2,311,075 


593 


80 


1,633,525 


703 


56 


677,550 


431 


51 


Talbot 


3,225,860 


861 


54 


2,213,910 


866 


26 


1,011,950 


851 


38 


Washington 


11,139,850 


706 


51 


10,558,850 


683 


39 


581,000 


1,833 


96 




7,526,727 


1,016 


84 


5,181,777 


930 


75 


2,344,950 


1,278 


04 


Worcester 


4,026,700 


887 


25 


3,223,700 


1,111 


77 


803,000 


489 


99 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



172 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CHART 5 

Per Cent of Total Revenues Appropriated for Public Schools: Counties and 
Incorporated Places in Maryland: 1953-54 (1953*) 



County 


Total 




^Current 
^fl Expense s 

10 20 


^.^Debt Service and 
30 ho 50 6o 70 








1 1 1 


i . i . , 


Total State 


39.8 


32.9 






Baltimore City 


30.6 


28.0 




ED 2.6 


Total Counties 


19.0 


37.6 




■^BL__I L1.2 


Montgomery 


62.6 


U6.3 






Cecil 


1. A o 


Ui.2 




1 111 7 


Caroline 


16.1 


U2.L 




HB_J 3.7 


Prince George 1 s 


53.7 


Ul.9 




■ In.ft 


Baltimore 


U9.8 


10. 7 




^HflH_J - • 


Worcester 


U8.1 


38.1 




H___J io.o 


Washington 


U5.0 


38.1 




6.9 


Somerset 


57.6 


36.0 






Howard 


U2.3 


33.6 




■ Q 1 

1 












Harford 


U5.9 


33.1 




_J12.o 


Kent 


U5.0 


32.6 




"3 12 »h 


Carroll 


U5.8 


32.3 




1 13.5 


Calvert 


50.6 


31.3 




— . 

■i 1 19.3 


Anne Arundel 


U2.9 


30.8 




m 112.1 


Allegany 


37.2 


30.1 




■CD7.1 


Talbot 


Uo.h 


29.6 




| Jio.e 


Queen Anne's 


37.8 


28.5 




■ | 9.3 


Wicomico 


39.7 


28.1 




■ I11.6 


Frederick 


33.Ii 


27.9 




■_J5.5 


Dorchester 


32.8 


27.8 




B~~i5.0 


Charles 


55.5 


25.6 




1 129.9 


Garrett 


29.9 


18.2 




| 11.7 


St. Mary's 


29.3 


15.6 




J 13.7 



* Calendar year 1953. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



173 



uo 



cm co cc uo oc 
e o o o 



t- • ^ us t- -*r ec 



W o 
& 2 
z 



Q 5 



cn x uo x cn 

(C -i X C! 



CM t- CM O <-» 



NWOCO 
X O t~ CM 01 



^ t» u: tc a 



cn ■* 
cm 01 uo 



H0< 

O 

^§ 

O 



CO CM CO X Cn CM «~i CO ID CC «ifi(CO<C 



CM (71 OC CO — 
t~ CM Cn O CO 



xc.mKf cn cn co o <o 



Ot»H 

uocnx 



*3 



a: 



g c 
t. a 



o m 



3 2 



O O o o 

OO^fOOO 
10 5000 



X <0 — > uo 
C— Ci *f UO CO 00 
CM CCWCftCO 

t> o n t- io ai 

CM COCMCncn — 
CO CC t~ X 



cc ■* am<Do 

<© ©,©_■<* ©.t"; 

t» t-CM-fCnO 

o co cn ^ co oc 

UO UO X -h — i CM 



CCfCOOO! 

uo cn co ih o 

t~COCMCOU0 
CO CO ^ o 
en co i-i cm co 



co o co en ^ 



• o • o cnt-xuoo t- oc oc c o co co o 

• o ■ t— cc uo cm o r - o cc o uo c cm co 
■o -en coececxo wc»x^ t^ot- 



lO t> CO CM 00 

Tj< Tf iCTf 

cm en o cm oo 



CMOKCOCO 

co oo o uo co 
cc cm x t> co 

co — < co "0 1~ 

NOOt-t 
t> t- CM 'f O 



CMt^OOC"* 
00 CM 00 O 00 
CM 00 0_-* 

OOWHHfj 
CM t> CO UO 
O ^ UO CM 



CM 00 CO O CO 
•h t- CM t- CO 

oc oc en o uo 



.CM ~* — ' 



t-uocncccc 
5>xh(ox 

cn CM^UO CM 
i-it!> CO CM X 

tt o cn t> «-h 
cm cn CO CM ^ 



ocoo— icn 

C~ CM t> —i y~> 
Tf UO t> CM CO 



TJ" CO 

UO t- 
co x 



co co ; 
i< oc cn ( 

CM CO UO CO CM UO t> I 



OtOHWX 
CO CO C- CO — 
CO t> ~i X uo 



t-CM-Tcnco 

O CO t~ t~ UO 

c^cc^cn— > 



UO X CM O CM 
O CO — CO t- 

uoo__cn 

UOt^CO-^CM 

t- Tf O lO 

CM CM CO 



cn x en x 

XOUOCOC- 
"3 ©_<>1 

CM t*- O t> O 
X CO t- CM X 

cn co cm co 



uo cn o co ~* 
■*r cm co co 

N <0 N OOlH 
UO — CO t- O 

x t- cm co cn 
cn cn cn uo — t 



x t- 

uo co 
» uo © 

—.xuo 
co ~ en 
text 



COOX 
CM —i CO 

uo o_ en 

uo X-f 
CO uo CM 

en —i co 



co co o 

IOOCM 

tj< co cn 
co —i cn 
co cn cm 



2 5 



CO UO CO CM 



c.5 « 

3 3 
O 3 C 

o > 
•sua* 

° 3fiJ 



3 ^Q. 



x CJ 



U = C M « C3 «5j=o_ 
- «C5CU UUUQfc 



as oS O cj o 



?! c 00 
c c£ 



174 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 120 

Calculated Maryland County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates : 

1953-54 





Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 
























Additional 


















Rates in 


County 










Debt Service 


Published 


Districts 








Current 


and 


Tax Rates °a 




and 




Total 


F>xpenses 


Capital 




Incorporated 












Outlay 




PI a cesfr 


Total State 


$1 


36 


$1 


12 


$0 


24 








Baltimore City! 




28 


1 


16 





12 


$2 .82 






Total Counties 




41 


1 


09 





32 








Allegany 


1 


21 





98 





23 


1 .87 


$0 


10-$1.36 




1 


45 


tl 


08 





37 


1 Q1 





75- 1.00 


Baltimoref 


1 


41 


fl 


12 





29 


1.98 






Calvert 


1 


.73 


tl 


06 





67 


2.25 





75-1 .40 


Caroline 




04 





96 





08 


1.50 





25- 1.15 


Carrollt 




17 





88 





29 


1.45 





50- 0.85 


Cecil 


1 


05 


to 


95 





10 


1.45 





20- 1.83 


Charles 


1 


43 


to 


73 





70 


1.55 





50- 0.80 




1 


08 





89 





19 


1.55 





50- 1.25 


Frederick! 


1 


09 


to 


90 





19 


1.40 





10- 1.55 


Garrettf 


1 


16 





77 





39 


2.00 





40- 0.90 


Harfordf 




05 


to 


81 





24 


1.34 





85- 1.00 


Howard! 


1 


30 


tl 


02 





28 


1.85 






Kentf 




.43 


1 


04 





39 


1.90 





io-o.8o 






63 


tl 


21 





42 


1.87 





09- 1.00 


Prince George's 




76 


tl 


37 


' 


39 


2.13 





25- 4.21 


Queen Anne'sf 


1 


20 





89 





31 


1.70 





20- 0.90 


St. Mary's 


1 


09 


to 


58 





51 


1.50 




0.90 


Somerset 




.08 





90 





18 


1.65 





60- 1.50 


Talbot 




16 





85 





31 


1.80 





20- 1.25 


Washington! 


1 


26 





97 





29 


1.50 





37- 0.75 


Wicomico 


1 


33 





94 





39 


1.67 





30- 1.12 


Worcester 


1 


03 





87 





16 


1.25 





95- 1.40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total assessed valua- 
tions, as used in calculation of State aid payments, 
t Calendar year fiscal period. 

t Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874 and or Public Law 874 as amended. 
Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax is excluded. 
a Excludes rates for special service levies. 
b Figures are from report of State Fiscal Research Bureau. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 121 

1953-54 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County Purposes: 

State of Maryland 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore Cityf . 

Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundelf. 
Baltimore! . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carrollf 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchesterf. . . 
Frederickf 

Garrettf 

Harfordf 

Howardf 

Kentf 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne'af 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington! . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total 
Assessable at 
Full Rate* 



$5,478,794,082 

2,240,840,181 

3,237,953,901 

156,945,865 
183,656,793 
835,885,323 
14,647,843 
25,639,442 

80,547,841 
70,266,970 
24,710,786 
55,698,460 
114,467,828 

28,654,114 
122,989,795 
36,508,700 
25,009,985 
658,629,020 

388,897,637 
29,909,221 
25,541,849 
21,606,526 
39,163,905 

163,357,171 
82,724,115 
52,494,712 



Assessed by 
Local Public 
Authority 



$4,289,953,113 

1,719,941,171 

2,570,011,942 

101,383,395 
163,033,711 
624,842,214 
13,022,953 
20,691,702 

59,831,641 
46,254,745 
20,449,370 
38,990,740 
83,479,375 

19,734,784 
84,221,033 
28,489,370 
20,368,095 
595,944,010 

332,537,275 
25,836,861 
20,700,299 
16,890,916 
33,032,385 

115,792,381 
61,014,535 
43,470,152 



Federal 
Housing 
Authority 



$27,950,769 
15,400,330 
12,550,439 



164,942 
3,787,879 



546,765 
59,306 



107,143 
4,230,242 



1,380,300 
2,273,862 



Assessed by 
State Tax 
Commission^ 



$1,160,890,200 

505,498,680 

655,391,520 

55,562,470 
20,458,140 
207,255,230 
1,624,890 
4,947,740 

20,716,200 
23,465,460 
4,202,110 
16,707,720 
30,881,310 

8,919,330 
34,538,520 
8,019,330 
4,641,890 
61,304,710 

54,086,500 
4,072,360 
4,841,550 
4,715,610 
6,131,520 

47,564,790 
21,709,580 
9,024,560 



* Excludes classes A through J motor vehicles. 

f Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 

| Data are for the year ended December 31, 1953, adjusted as of October, 1954. 

Estimated by dividing net receipts after distribution to incorporated towns and places by the 
county tax rate. 



176 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 





O 

■»* 


iO 




oc_ 


-J. 


oo* 


o" 


t~-* 


t - 


"J" 


eo 


-<f 




cm 


in* 

M 




n 



(Ot-iOXO> 

*f m oo co 
oi» oc <o to 
co*eo*in "**in* 
mooeo»-icM 



00 00 00 

•*f CO <-< OS CO 
in CM l~ CO 

oc t- cm us i-< 



CO 0) in <0 co 
00 ^OlO 00 

oj oi eo o j in 



oc a> o) <r> -t 
aot oto 
oo niovH 

X CM Ol CM CO 

eo 



t- ■«* m 
t0 01 a> 
cot--* 

co'oj o>r 

CO GO id 



'O H M M O 

00 (M C7J t- CO 

« co t- ^co_ 

.-*,-<',-* CO* ^jf 

in CO iO iH OJ 



o t~ m o O) 

iO ph CO OC 00 

m*co"co'''-*co 

t- CD M "2 O 



m h 3i ce ai co m in n cti 

—icoi^cooc Tj«oocoooo 

eg oo oo en oo o <o oo^oo 

t-*co*«*CO*t-" CO*X*^*0*CO* 

oioeooieji CO CM OX-* CO 

-< CO 



^ ^- a> 

3 N O 



m o 

m t- 

i-T o* 

en oo 

co o> 



a> ai ai - 

0- i o m cm eo 

1- 7 HOIHM 
Tf ^f< -rf CM 

HHin 



cm a> m m . 



eo cm ^ o o 

00 (M OO CO 
C75 00 t- t- 



->t o 

cnxH x co_ 

OcSrfusco in'oOMo" 

l-COCM^O CM O CO CM CM 

-M--M- IH i-l 



Tf oc co oj 

CM C7S O 
Tf CON CO 00 

m*co*o oo* tj* 
ooojcM>-ieo 

CM 



in eo 
ctj in 
eo t-*eo 

OlrHCM* 

eo 



mco^oooo hoowH m oo •"-< m a> cj> «-i eo co-#m 

oi o a> eo co hucom x t~ m tt rftoicoeo —loom 

inmooHH <oa> fHio cm NC4>oeoo io^hcm 

m*© <-<'»-«' *tr*o>o6m in"eo*x v*e$ cm*^*!— "x'i-T co*eo*o6* 

coco»-ieoa> cm a> cm cm m eotM'- | - H eo co co co 

••-+++ h co w •-< 



D 
l> 
00 


■f 
t- 

00 


CO 

o» 
9) 


o* 
oo 
°l 


,838, 


,141, 


eo* 

4* 




CM 



» eo_co © 
co"m*d - . • 

CO CM C75 *— * CM 



a cm 
© S 



CO 



00 COC751""*CO 

eo m tj" h b- to 

o> en co co x_cm 

in r-i *h ooo> o 



in t — o co o 
ncoiONH 
Cft CNC0_^CO 
O*0*0*r« 00* 

co co co x 



h t- oo oo oo 
x co — m 

t> t-i O © oi 



cr ~ ~. ~ — ' 

o to x m co 
o coco t> m 



co 

Ol © UO 

eo in cm 
x*x*m* 
oi m co 



0) 


co 


eo 
t— 


EO 


o 


m 


CO* 




m* 


m 


70 


CM 


CM 


CM. 


o 


CM* 

M 







co in o x i 

Ht-O)H00 



co cm in co x 
co i-i m 



cm co cm in 

CO © X CO CO 
COhcCOCJ 



OOCf ON 

co t* co M oo 

CM O © CO 



ooooTf 

-<t CO X 

eomo 



Hrf m o x 

t~ uo CC^X 0J 

ot--V*inin 

00 *9 O — < 



m x x x -f 
x -<r as <ji cm 



nncocMO) 
m co to co x 
co o oc 



CM CM © Ol X 

-lOiocaiN 

CO CO CM CO 



in CO CM CM t- C- CM C75 t- X 
CM XOiCOOMCM KOOOlOCJ 
C~ XCOCM^rO CO »— i CO C7i CM 



co c ~ ~ oo h oo co cn c- o -^r as 

OXt-r^o mc7>COOCM C71 t- 

eo m co m m coo^hcocti inwin 

x"x"x"x"— r co'x'inTfin* x"-^*t>*oco* cm'oco* 

XCM in CM -h — rC X f-H ^h-h to CM •— ' 



-3 
c 

2£ 



&sl >*3 

S C d at 



o 



UUOQfc 



a) o rt „ 
C"C ts"5S 

ctf rt O 0)O 



£r ai 

iisil 



c e tn 

ail 

cS.Si O 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



TABLE 123 

Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 1953-54 



County 



Total Basis Assessable at 
Full Rate for County 
Purposes 



Number of 
Pupils Belonging^ 



Wealth per Pupil 



Total State 

Baltimore City.. . . 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$5,478,794 

♦2,240,840 

3,237,954 

156,946 
♦183,657 
♦835,885 
14,648 
25,639 

♦80,548 
70,267 
24,711 
♦55,698 
♦114,468 

♦28,654 
♦122,990 
♦36,509 
♦25,010 
658,629 

388,898 
♦29,909 
25,542 
21,606 
39,164 

♦163,357 
82,724 
52.495 



422,865 
134,400 

288,465 

15,507 
24,403 
52,292 
3,111 
3,837 

8,698 
7,099 
5,704 
5,191 
11,497 

4,460 
11,842 
5,007 
2,791 
42,711 

42,028 
3,063 
3,879 
3,892 
3,744 

15,768 
7,402 
4,539 



* Calendar year (1953). 

t Includes kindergarten and prekindergarten pupils. 



178 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CHART 6 

Per Capita Income Payments in Eleven States, Including Maryland: 1952-53 



State 



1 Delaware 



2 Connecticut 



3 Nevada 



h New York 



$ New Jersey 



6 Illinois 



7 California 



8 Ohio 



9 Jttchigan 



10 VJ aching ton 



11 Maryland 



Amount 



Per Capita Income Payments 
(in Hundreds of Dollars) 

2 1; 6 10 12 ala 16 18 20 2 2 2h 

| I I I I I I I I I I I | 




Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, August, 1954. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



179 




180 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



CHART 8 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland and Baltimore 

City: 1953-54 



County 


Amount 






Daltimore City 


11.77 


Total Counties 


10.92 


'lontgomery 


22.39 


Baltimore 


m.97 


Talbot 


12.20 


Prince George's 


10.h9 


Washington 


9.51 


Howard 


8.39 


Harford 


8.31 


Anne Arundel 


/ .00 


Wicomico 


7.73 


Kent 


7.61 


Cecil 


7.57 


Frederick 


6.U9 


Queen Anne 1 s 


6.28 


Carroll 


5.83 


Allegany 


5.69 


Dorchester 


5.U2 


Charles 


5.10 


Worcester 


5.02 


Caroline 


h.SO 


Calvert 


3.68 


St. Kary's 


3.23 


Somerset 


3.19 


Garrett 


2.17 



Per Capita Income Tax 
2 U6 8 10 12U36 

T 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 



18 20 22 2h 
-I 1 1 1 





Sources: Report of the Comptroller of the Treasury'of Maryland, Fiscal Year~1954; 1953-54 population 
estimates from Maryland State Health Department. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



Q 

j a 

< C£ 

ss 
H 8 



lis 



HlCHNNiflNiflHI 



* "oases'* 



M CO ^-i C-) CO ^ 



eoot-cotoco — wooio 

* J2 C3X! 



NO<OOIHIN<OOCO>« 



a j 

Z < 
< H 

« o 



M Z 



~. C. T. - J * T- T. ~. ~. T. 



182 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



a >> 

IS c 

o 3 

rt o 



n 



w 3 
rt o 



£ a 



rt o 
£0 



n n n 



E S 

O 3 



wnH -in 



c >> 
IS c 



cm • -co m 



Sri 



C >> 

X c 

« 3 

S ° 



lecoeceo -hioicb noojiSi 



3 65 



2 5' 
S S 
o 2 



eo t 



CO (M O 00 t> 



3 g 

a 6 1 |||ti| a 



o S 



O CQ 



OUUQ&. 



« 

E 
c 

<D O C4 ' 4? 

<* « o a; o 



11*11 



o _ 
|ES 

sis 
£££ 



Maryland State Department of Education 183 



TABLE 126 

Total Enrollment* at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fall of 1944-1953 



Fall of 


Grand 
Total 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 


1944 


684 


440 


83 


120 


237 


244 


110 


134 


1945 


823 


580 


150 


163 


267 


243 


121 


122 


1946 


1,286 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


254 


129 


125 


1947 


1,489 


1,178 


258 


310 


610 


311 


152 


159 


1948 


1,725 


1,393 


357 


300 


736 


332 


160 


172 


1949 


2,098 


1,688 


444 


340 


904 


410 


210 


200 


1950 


2,054 


1,634 


441 


273 


920 


420 


221 


199 


1951 


1,944 


1,496 


403 


213 


880 


448 


268 


180 


1952 


2,136 


1,609 


478 


266 


865 


527 


323 


204 


1953 


2,307 


1,727 


438 


329 


960 


580 


334 


246 



Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special students. 



TABLE 127 



Enrollment by College and Class : Maryland State Teachers Colleges : 
Fall of 1953 



Maryland State Teachers College Enrollment 



Class 




















Grand 


Total 








Total 








Total 


White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 


TEACHER TRAINING 


Total 


1,848 


1,268 


295 


143 


830 


580 


334 


246 


Freshmen 


632 


441 


84 


55 


302 


191 


99 


92 


Sophomores. . . 


463 


293 


72 


41 


180 


170 


101 


69 




362 


243 


55 


33 


155 


119 


70 


49 


Seniors 


391 


291 


84 


14 


193 


100 


64 


36 








JUNIOR 


COLLEGE 








Total 


321 


321 


93 


98 


130 








Freshmen 


243 


243 


60 


76 


107 








Sophomores. . . 


78 


78 


33 


22 


23 














OTHER 


STUDENTS 








Extension or 




















138 


138 


50 


88 










Elementary School . 


676 


575 


163 


143 


269 


101 


101 





184 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



tuoiueg 



Bjoiunp 



sajoiuoqdog 



BJOiuag 



sjoiunp 



sajoiuoqdog 



uaiuqsajj 



S CO <M 05 <M <£> CO CO ' 



■ C-) CO •— I • CM tH 



oc eo — ■ cm m co 



O CO CO NN' 



■Mf H» CO-H (M <D -t • lO • o> eo 



<J> rH CO lO HOCCMi 



COCOCTJ ■ HM^ftON t» 



Bjoiuag 



saoiunf 



CO M -iHOO rHCM -.-iiC U5 ■ iM • 



eajouioqdog 



l!MHHtf HIOH CO (ON 



uaiuqsojj 



C-l C^J CO >— i cc 



SJOiuag 



sjomnf 



sajouioqdog 



U9lUqS8Jj[ 



OHH00 C5. 



Bjoiuag 



sjoiunj* 



sajotuoqdog 



uauiqsajjj 



sjoiuag 



rH © O t-COt-00<N (NHMWO NNH -00 tONOJNN iO , 

(J> rH L0> !N t>rHC0 rH rH <-H< 

CO rH iM 



saoiunf 



iHweoo ooco-^J" 



sajotuoqdog 



>eo ocq« 



uatuqBaj^ 



<N O CO 



3 g 



T3 ° ■£! 



= C c3 



CI..S =3 



1*11 



E 

o 

« o c3 ' ^ 

cs es O o O 



b 2 ' 

s g ■ 

PhQ'mwE-' 



° « fci 

•siJ o 
£££ 



03 E- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



TABLE 129 

Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers College by County — Class: 

Fall of 1953 













White Enrollment 


Colored Enrollment 


Area 




Grand Total 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 






Total 


r resn- 


sopho- 


T1 1- 

r resn- 


bopno- 


r resn- 


bopno- 


r resn- 


_ . 
bopno- 


_, , 
r resn- 


bopno- 


r resn 


bopno- 






men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


men 


mores 


Total State 


321 


243 


78 
3 


60 


33 


76 


22 
3 


107 


23 










Oiit-of-StatP 


12 


9 


2 


6 


1 










Baltimore City 




47 


35 


12 






1 




34 


12 










Total Counties 




262 


199 


63 


58 


33 


69 


19 


72 


11 










Allptranv 




84 


54 


30 


53 


30 






1 












Anne Arundel . 


5 


4 


1 






4 


i 










Baltimore 




44 


39 


5 






i 




88 


5 










Calvert. . . 




1 


1 












1 












Caroline 




8 


5 


3 






5 
















Carroll 


7 


7 




1 








6 












Cecil 


4 


4 








2 




2 












Charles 


5 


5 








3 




2 












Dorchester, . . . 


8 


5 


3 






5 
















Frederick . 




7 


6 


1 


2 


i 






'4 












Garrett. . . 




1 




1 




l 


















Harford. . . 




11 


io 


1 


i 




3 




6 


i 










Howard 




1 




1 






















Kent 


























Montgomery . . 


'4 


*4 












4 












Prince George's 


7 


5 


2 






2 




3 


1 










Queen Anne'B . . 




























St. Mary's 






























Somerset . 




'8 


7 


i 






















Talbot 




2 


2 








2 
















Washingtoi 


i . . . 


5 


1 


4 




l 






1 


3 










Wicomico . 




43 


36 


7 






36 


*7 














Worcester . 




7 


4 


3 


i 




3 


3 















186 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



a 2 

E * 



£ « 
21 



C5 

X o 
CO — « 



• 



E | 

11 



11 



z < 



O « 



Is 



- >_ «_ c 2 a 
JO UUUQfe 



O O eS ■ 

USUI 

w — — — ^ 



in 

§.2 o 
£££ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



TABLE 131 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1945-1954 







Current Expenses 


Average 


Annual Cost per 
Student 


Year 


Average 














Ending 


Enroll- 




Paid by 


Paid by 




In Student 


To 




ment 


Total 


Students 


State 


Total 


Fees 


State 


FROSTBURG 


1945 


73 


$*85,601 


$14,573 


$♦71,028 


$1,173 


$a200 


$973 


1946 


91 


108,882 


11,281 


97,601 


1,197 


6124 


1,073 


1947 


243 


152,531 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


6127 


501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


6178 


759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


6203 


672 


1950 


374 


262,317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


6134 


567 


1951 


339 


316,664 


57,636 


259,028 


934 


6170 


764 


1952 


338 


318,342 


42,462 


275,880 


942 


6126 


816 


1953 


373 


402,258 


88,372 


313,886 


1,078 


6237 


841 


1954 


394 


418,682 


58,716 


359,966 


1,063 


6149 


914 



SALISBURY 



1945 


103 


$*93,031 


$21,157 


$*71,874 


$903 


$a205 


$698 


1946 


153 


104,121 


22,184 


81,937 


681 


6145 


536 


1947 


280 


145,226 


46,960 


98,266 


519 


6168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


6236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


6211 


684 


1950 


286 


270,107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


6194 


750 


1951 


200 


268,942 


38,999 


229,943 


1,345 


6195 


1,150 


1952 


174 


282,935 


22,765 


260,170 


1,626 


6131 


1,495 


1953 


234 


349,424 


54,129 


295,295 


1,493 


6231 


1,262 


1954 


250 


343,124 


41,983 


301,141 


1,372 


6168 


1,204 



TOWSON 



1945 


222 


$*211,981 


$46,227 


$*165,754 


$955 


$a208 


$747 


1946 


264 


250,048 


32,550 


217,498 


947 


6123 


824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


6142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328,034 


689 


6164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


6113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


6106 


572 


1951 


879 


633,145 


107,164 


525,981 


720 


6122 


598 


1952 


855 


757,257 


92,816 


664,441 


886 


6109 


777 


1953 


851 


842,915 


121,076 


721,839 


990 


6142 


848 


1954 


893 


962,662 


135,050 


827,612 


1,078 


6151 


927 



BOWIE 



1945 


103 


$*76,536 


$15,099 


$*61,437 


$743 


$<fl45 


$598 


1946 


121 


93,004 


17,055 


75,949 


769 


el41 


628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


el44 


729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1,073 


/151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


/181 


915 


1950 


207 


212,373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


/127 


899 


1951 


218 


226,790 


33,750 


193,040 


1,040 


/155 


885 


1952 


262 


261,264 


32,810 


228,454 


997 


/125 


872 


1953 


331 


316,737 


59,506 


257,231 


957 


/180 


777 


1954 


343 


351,712 


72,599 


279,113 


1,025 


/211 


814 



COPPIN 



195 


$57,054 




$57,054 


$293 


177 


59,415 




59,415 


336 


197 


126,542 


5,390 


121,152 


642 


236 


159,193 


8,103 


151,090 


674 



1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 



$27 



$293 
336 
615 
640 



* Includes bonus payments by State. 

a Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 

6 In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for white teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Board is $216 for teacher training students 
planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 addi- 
tional, out-of-state students, $200. 

d Resident students paid $140. There is no tuition fee. 

e Resident students paid $155. There is no tuition fee. 

/ Resident students paid $171. There is no tuition fee except for out-of-state and junior college students- 



188 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



on 
a 

a 

e 



CZ3 



a c 



H 

- ps 

H 
CO 





T 

co 


CM 


U3 


CO 
OJ 


o 

CM 


i- 


eo 


co 


5 


CO 


C 1 


oj* 


OJ* 


co* 


CO* 






o> 
M 




.-• 


-T 


OJ 





CO 

eo cm 

.-H o 



if t- 

CM «# 
©* CM* 



m 
CM 


CO 


eo 


i - 


tr- 






in 


ee 








M 









*-<* t> 



- En 



3 b C 

5 | S 

§ s * 

- rt <= 



o o 
— U 



•So- 
rt ^ 

^3 



— o 

s *| 

•J E 

S is 
rt cj 

H o. C3 

— H 

0) 



rt « 
rt 



'Si 

td | 



lJ ft 



«> CM CM CO <J> i-« 
05 t-° iC i OS CC it- t" 
O — <_ t- 03 CM CO ^|» 

m* t-* m" t- cd io co 

t- -h O XT t- 00 CO 
CI CM CM rH 



m 


• ■WOCl^O 

• ■ 04 t— 00 f— i J 


oi 
m 

CM 


! ; co -i o eo' in 

. . CO 01 t- — i 

. .eoencnoocM 


O* 

fc» 
°l 


<£> «>" 1*0*00* 

cm co o i or. -r 

Tj« 01 CO 


CO* 
'/.- 





ov cc f (0 eo 
cm l- m T in 
■h ^in «) in 
i-*cd*x*o*o* 
t- oj oj o> o> 
oi oi oj eo 



OS t- CO OS <£> 5£> 

co co eo eo eo «-i — i 

i-J 1 iH t- CO OJ 

to t- oi © t- oi o* 

t , rH O CO OJ CD 01 

01 OS t- © I- OS 



2 2-2-3 

rt § e= R R ft 

o *- t. c ° ° o 

W o aJ" aJ 1 eiT a> 



c a) a> cj 



01 

z — y " '. ■ " '>- 
% (E o a; <u aJ 
- ~; j= j= .c jc xi 
g o o y w y 
Q— cs rt rt rt rt 
CJ p CJ o oi a> 01 
Q a3 HE- HE- £-« 

'oi'o 0) O 0) 01 0)' 
rt rt rt 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



TABLE 134 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active Service 
and Their Contributions: Year Ending July 31, 1954 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed Year 
Ending July 31, 1954 



Members in Active Service 
May 31, 1954 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery (including Jr. Colleges) 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington (including Jr. College) . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments ... 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Departments 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School .... 
St. Mary's Seminary — Junior College 



$1,733,440.76 

$1,627,884.68 

110,071.32 
113,693.04 
307,920.36 
16,271.17 
23,940.53 
44,969.70 
38,059.28 
32,905.60 
33.985.99 
56,141.03 
26,766.46 
56,816.31 
27,708.69 
21,103.44 
270,032.64 
188,915.13 
22,806.83 
13,404.04 
23,673.06 
23,257.86 
107,536.57 
42,535.70 
25,369.93 

$105,556.08 

$52,951.93 

5,739.10 
3,746.21 

12,097.80 
7,861.22 

23,507.60 

$32,383.12 

8,828.06 
23,123.46 
431.60 

$20,221.03 

891.34 
5,639.68 
7,547.96 
1,195.82 
2,548.17 
2,398.06 



9,012 

8,618 

588 
611 
1,600 
98 
134 
264 
205 
183 
183 
314 
154 
329 
155 
115 
1,254 
1,002 
114 
82 
140 
131 
557 
249 
156 

394 

178 



13 
34 
28 
81 

127 

52 
73 
2 



190 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 135 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Schools: 
Years Ending June 30, 1953 and 1954 



County 


White Schools 




Colored 


Schools 






Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1953 


1954 


1953 


1954 


1953 


1954 


1953 


1954 


Total Counties 


533 


555 


92 


4 


95 


.5 


179 


179 


91 


.8 


96 


.2 


Allegany 


32 


28 


88 


9 


87 


.5 


1 


2 


50 


.0 


100 


.0 




39 


42 


100 





100 


.0 


22 


21 


100 


.0 


100 


.0 


Baltimore 


56 


60 


96 


.5 


100 


.0 


14 


14 


100 


.0 


100 


.0 


Calvert 


6 


7 


100 





100 


.0 


9 


9 


100 


.0 


100 


.0 


Caroline 


9 


9 


100 





100 


.0 


4 


4 


100 


.0 


100 


.0 


Carroll 


17 


17 


89 


5 


94 


.4 


2 


2 


100 


.0 


100 


.0 


Cecil 


17 


16 


77 


3 


76 


.2 


3 


3 


100 


.0 


100 


.0 


Charles 


8 


7 


100 





100 





14 


13 


100 


.0 


100 


.0 


Dorchester 


16 


17 


64 





85 


.0 


11 


6 


91 


.7 


60 


.0 




25 


26 


83 


3 


86 


.7 


6 


7 


75 





87 


.5 


Garrett 


27 


26 


84 


4 


83 


.9 














Harford 


24 


22 


100 





100 





2 


2 


66 


.7 


100 


.6 


Howard 


10 


10 


100 





100 





9 


8 


100 





100 


.0 


Kent 


10 


10 


100 





100 





6 


6 


100 





100 


.0 


Montgomery 


68 


73 


100 





100 





9 


10 


90 





100 







58 


70 


100 





98 


6 


23 


21 


100 





100 







12 


14 


80 





100 







9 






100 





St. Mary's 


9 


10 


69 


2 


90 


9 


6 


7 


85 


7 


100 





Somerset 


12 


12 


100 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100 





Talbot 


11 


11 


100 





100 





10 


8 


100 





80 





Washington 


41 


42 


95 


3 


95 


5 


1 




100 





100 





16 


16 


100 





100 





9 


10 


100 





100 





Worcester 


10 


10 


100 





100 





9 


7 


100 





100 






Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



TABLE 136— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1944-1953; and by 

Type of School : 1953 









Net Roll at End of Term 
















XT 

Number 


I EAR 


XT 

Number 


Total 








OI 




01 


Enroll- 




Taking 


Principals 


Type of School 


Schools 


ment 


Total 






and 














i eacnera 










Review 


Advance 












Work 


Work 




All Schools 














1944 


13 


6,874 


5 976 


5,108 


868 


142 




13 


6,465 


5750 


5,052 


698 


123 


1 QAd 




O,o01 


6, 159 


5,428 


731 






12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 




5 


3,686 


3 421 


2,895 


526 


86 


1949 


5 


4,222 


3^865 


3,275 


590 


92 


1950 


5 


4,010 


3*628 


2 990 


638 


78 




5 


4,145 


3 710 


3*258 


452 


80 




o 


A O'iA 


3*945 


3,564 


381 


an 




5 


4,726 


4,373 


3,954 


419 


80 


White Schools 


3 


3,335 


3,069 


2,820 


249 


55 


Secondary 


2 


3,149 


2,892 


2,820 


72 


47 


Senior 


1 


1,706 


1,583 


1,511 


72 


28 


Junior 




1,443 


1,309 


1,309 




19 


Demonstration 




186 


177 




177 


8 


Colored Schools 


2 


1,391 


1,304 


1,134 


170 


25 


Secondary 




1,215 


1,134 


1,134 




17 


Senior \ 




455 


444 


444 




6 


Junior ( 




760 


690 


690 




11 


Demonstration 


1 


176 


170 




170 


8 



* No elementary review schoo.s beginning 1948. 



TABLE 137 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland: 1945-54 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Applicants Tested 


Number of 
Certificates IssuedJ 


Nonhigh School 
Graduates* 


High School 
Graduates! 


1945 


72 




26 


1946 


1,128 




477 


1947 


2,411 


148 


1,169 


1948 


1,469 


129 


al,525 


1949 


1,129 


156 


61,288 


1950 


1,081 


81 


cl,079 


1951 


912 


52 


d939 


1952 


779 


51 


el,107 


1953 


1,005 


59 


/1.313 


1954 


1,377 


65 


01,724 



* Includes re-tests. 

t High school graduates who took tests at request of colleges. 

t Includes certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services, as follows: 
a, 443; b, 457; c, 332; d, 291; e, 580; /, 613; g, 837. 



192 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 138— Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: 

Year Ending June 30, 1954 



State of Maryland 





Total 




Being 




Being 


Surveyed: 


Closed: 


County 


Number 


Reha- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 


Being 


Other 




Cases 


bilitated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


Counseled 


Services 


Total State 


4,280 


881 


56 


297 


865 


1,483 


698 


Baltimore City 


2,032 


337 


24 


99 


390 


833 


349 


Total Counties 


2,248 


544 


32 


198 


475 


650 


349 


Allegany 


172 


42 




21 


38 


39 


32 


Anne Arundel .... 


183 


30 


3 


14 


45 


47 


44 




321 


47 


7 


21 


56 


81 


109 


Calvert 


11 


3 




1 


2 


4 




Caroline 


43 


16 




1 


11 


15 




Carroll 


87 


22 




7 


21 


28 


8 


Cecil 


60 


15 


1 


2 


16 


21 


5 


Charles 


27 


7 




3 


5 


11 


1 


Dorchester 


70 


22 


3 


2 


11 


25 


7 


Frederick 


146 


43 


3 


30 


28 


31 


11 


Garrett 


55 


12 




5 


14 


14 


10 


Harford 


75 


24 


i 


6 


7 


29 


8 




31 


4 


1 


1 


11 


7 


7 


Kent 


28 


5 




1 


9 


9 


4 




201 


57 


i 


21 


32 


59 


31 


Prince George's. . . 


241 


61 


4 


20 


62 


86 


8 




32 


10 


1 


5 


5 


10 




St. Mary's 


30 


9 




3 


6 


10 


2 


Somerset 


36 


15 






9 


7 


5 


Talbot 


31 


9 


i 




7 


11 


2 


Washington 


187 


47 


l 


20 


43 


41 


35 




140 


34 


l 


11 


30 


52 


12 




41 


10 


2 


2 


7 


13 


7 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 



Total Number . . 

Age 

Under 21 

21-30 

31-40 

41-50 

Over 50 

Education 

None 

1-3 

4-6 

7-9 

10-12 

H. S. Graduate 

13-14 

15-16 

College 

Unknown 

Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

Over 5 



Total 



4,280 



1,181 

877 
863 
760 
599 



80 
272 
809 
1,580 
786 
514 
96 
64 
36 
43 



2,683 
556 
378 
257 
178 
95 
133 



Reha- 
bilitated* 



881 



197 
187 
210 
176 
111 



11 

45 
152 
314 
169 
137 
23 
21 



489 
114 
91 
79 
54 
24 
30 



Othert 



3,399 



984 
690 
653 
584 
488 



69 
227 
657 
1,266 
617 
377 
73 
43 
28 
42 



2,194 
442 
287 
178 
124 
71 
103 



Characteristic 


Total 


Reha- 
bilitated* 


Otherj" 


Race 








White 


3,098 


678 


2,420 




1,178 


202 


976 


Other 


4 


1 


3 


Sex 








Male 


2,895 


577 


2,318 


Female 


1,385 


304 


1,081 


Marital Status 








Single 


2,077 


354 


1,723 


Married 


1,501 


387 


1,114 


Other 


702 


140 


562 


Employment 








History (at 








Survey) 








Employed 


334 


128 


206 


Unemployed. . . 


3,946 


753 


3,193 


Never Worked . 




118 


708 


Worked at 








Sometime . . . 




635 


2,485 


Number on 








Welfare 








fat Survey) . . 


645 


120 


525 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (881). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,399). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19M 



TABLE 139 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: State of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Type ok Skbvice 



Total Expenditure 

Examinations 
Medical. . . 
Psychiatric 



Surgery and Treatment 

Medical 

Psychiatric 

Surgical 

Dental 

Physical and occupational therapy 



Prosthetic Appliances 

Artificial limbs 

Braces 

Hearing aids 

Glasses and artificial eyes 

Surgical appliances 

Wheel chairs, hand and power operated. 



Hospitalization and Convalescent Can: 

Hospitalization 

Convalescent home care 

Nursing care in client's residence 



Training and Training Materials 
Personal adjustment training . 

Educational institutions 

Employment 

Correspondence 

Tutorial 

Training materials 



Maintenance and Transportation 
Maintenance 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 

Inter-current illness 

Placement 

Transportation 

Training 

Medical or physical restoration 



Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 
Miscellaneous (Other) 



Total 
Expenditure 



Number of 
Clients 



$283,577 



12,093 
1,213 



2,864 
2,036 

17,572 
3,897 

11,948 



22,806 
5,381 
7,075 
1,737 
2,136 
2,657 



35,916 
2,034 



3,013 
69,045 
2,299 
2,054 
1,902 
7,084 



40,895 
10,500 

3i2 

8,590 
1,905 

3,523 

1,090 



,141 

48 



65 
29 
149 
40 
73 



121 
113 
64 

82 
92 
45 



165 

25 



592 
38 
91 
36 

336 



326 
62 



54 



339 
197 



194 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



c 

o 



♦» jo 53 
O « 3 



£ g 6| 

O 2 e« * 



o • • • © • © • • •© 

Tf . . . ,p . O ■ • O 
U3 • • CO ■ »h ■ ■ rH 



CO X 

.TP O 

^CO 



COCO 
X© 
COM 



eo«o 

• C CO 



•<* ■ ©o 
eo • • <g J£ 



©■* 

to uo 

CO 



ei o> o> 
cn <c 

co'co'w 



— cocn o 

t- ~- cn <c 

« © x 

o» co'co'co* 



©x 
©© 

COlO 



• X CO 
•CP 

■ eo co 



eo ■ •-< 
O r. ' - 
to iaco 



COOkrt 
UO CO CO 



XCOb- ■ © 
CO TP CO • OC 

x eo t- • 



co eo 
x © 
io eo 



' co co ~+ Tpcoeo co 



eoto-nr-x Tpeoocouo 

-c.cnu t-eoeox — 

X^uOJOX^CO OOtDi-UDie 

<-i'co©'-«*eo"' co*"-<'co*cj •-<* 



eo © m t- © 

L'Tf t-CO 

m coco © © 



x eo eo © eoeoeo 

co t eo x x x (0 eo 

weot-^co loeooo 

V Co'co'^Co"' fifHfM 



2 5 

ea o 

oa Eh 



3 £ 

53 C ed 
<<CS 



_ L. 1- 



cs 5 



111 

OQfc 



E 

o 

CP O c« ' £? 
feu S* C g 

a « o o> o 



a." 

o c ■ 

o< 



■Si .65 

u 3 J o a 



O _ 

pi 

8.2 o 

£££ 



5 c 

tn o 

O V 
O 3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



195 



g SSSSSSSSSSgSSS" 



S SSESSasssaggSST 



§ 5 Sll«slliiipi| 



g >0 r~ O cm cm 



i co t>. « >- ^ co 



iili 



n 

i " 



5 t*tt***t$tt& 



1 i III 

I iffiiffiffi 




ro — — to o x -t-cccDMi-c:- nmm 



fiS 



1 1 : l 

I ■ 



*2S 



1111 



1 i89^IMiH>8J»S|— El 

S» 



§ 



sill 



II 



I 
I 



Mt'im 




I 



I 




i I 11 II 



196 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



ooooo 



OO-iO'-l ooooo 



■oooo oooo 



OO-* 0.-H 



o^coo 



o 

ft O 



OOCMO«-i ooooo 



ooooo 



ooooo ooo 



O O M O ■— ' OOOOO OOO^HO OOOOO OOi 



co o x a> t- <-4 kOt^eout-H 

OC CM CO CO CO CO rtHTf u5M 



- tO <7> Ol CN «M<Oifl^ 

! d o> co x t- oc oc -t' t--' 

.0)0) cot- KXNO00 

. co co co o a. oj cm co «-i 



O irt CT> 



M M « M 

« x co 
C71 t-co 10 



. x x co co 

. t- t- CO 10 
. CO CM y-> 



O CO o 
Who 



t-OOiXO 

o^cmco cm 



1-- lti co x_o^ 



«7>XtT OX 



O tj< 10 
OXWI' 

con co t t> 



eo noo co 

O X CO CO 
X^CO_CM OC 

eoneS «-J co"co~ 



OJOCDOU5 
iOtJ" LOCO CM 

HO)oect» 



OS a> 
OC0C7J-H-* 

r-l t- CO t- t> 



o-«r 
co r- - oc 

CO 05 «-• 



oco x x o 

CM CO O (N X 
lO •«*' Tf UO CO 
©Tf ©> "V rH 

co ^c* 00 o 



CO CO LO LO T)> 

co O) m o a> 
co' 10 x' CM* 

LO OS CD « CM 



01 a> uoas 1-1 

^-COCMOO 



CO W t> LC CM 

a> tj< cm x 

X 05 CO 



CM CO — 

10 co co 

OCCH 



N CO 00 CM X t> CM >-i — CO CO 



• 3 cu ' 
S c a d d 



CV O C9 _ +i 



4-1 • 

0) J 

b b u o - c 3 J S « 



is! 

IIS 
£££ 



Maryland State 



Department of Education 



197 



Balance 
June 30, 
1954 


$216,790.00 
106.335.49 


149.353.57 
14.991.04 

37.779.01 
3,884.32 


.-££005, 

'fi-rd-C 
M — iC -r co 

. oet^qo-.cN 
tc at oc' r-~ co" 


CO 
CM 
Os 

O. 

«o 
w 


Total 
Disburse- 
ments and 
Reversions 


$8,1 98.916 00 1 
6.235.990.00 
13.145,217 00 
1,107,653.62 
1,265,631.16 
193 440.00 
6M32.00 
237,658.08 
75.000.00 
75,000.00 
552,131.00 
140,512.30 
5,000.00 
1.172.305.00 

675,017.86 
623.957.99 

6.583.671.53 
827,587.00 
3.000.00 
458.027.16 
379,295.04 

1,009,449.14 
385.050.62 
161,064.27 


f 13.576,706.77 


k 9 

cu.- 


$260.00 
21.600.32 
550,570.21 
4,847.42 
9,545.69 
10,367.67 
.60 

7.300.00 


11,445.87 
3.077.96 
270.27 

20.868.31 

"TO OKI O 'J 

78.S54.8i 
12,386.31 


.74 
2,920.77 
20,041.70 
4,743.37 
20,568.97 
612.79 


$780,283.80 



§°£?2~L:: v ?Ca r, = =>©co-t-co 

2 5 s ° I 8 § £ £ £ s £ - g 



1^ -_- 
10 — 

c-' M 



te OS i" 
osce co "S — 
cm t">; -r -r 



> 10 c- 



2©2<Mco©©r^©©r~-r©© 

5 -. C°tO - ©©»0©©iOCO©© 

ff. ■ . cc co cm — oa cotijjc^ 
. . - - - - - 



S"^t5'^'raOcCC-CiOiO — if; UO CM 
~; co _ © co — co-ri^r^O«5 r ~ 

. CM _ — CM CO t~ — ' ~ 

£co-£2--~- 



ooco^O©--rcqc>;co© 
ccci '-d C ci J ^i wj 
c: -r f~ oc — 1^ o £• cr. -> 
t>»«ioqxq 

CM* t - ^ I - SO "■' C: 

_ or cm co oc 
r-- CO "9 OO -r CO 



a eo 



000 

qqq 

CO 1^ CM 

r-_ iq co 
in" cm"— " 

CM — 



ggggg 

co co -rr at! us 

CO — CO CM 

oc cq iq os os_ 

-T* cm" UO CO* OS 



5 C 



l« U5 CM CM — ■ 

— "csoToo cxT 

CSlCMN 



5 c 

O 3 



2 © o o o o 
°. o <= S © © © 

2£ *d 2 co" »c" 10 to 

^M^Ogcoco 



22 
© © 

2!£ 



©©©©©©©©©© 
©©_©©©©©©©© 
edec^r^©©^ooce«o 
'rf"5u;c-»occ ^ 
co" ©" ~r rV co" «d os" cm" ud — T 

CO CM "0 OC CO CM f~ CM — 



CO 

PQ"-> 



S£g 
r - td © 

CO © IO 
00 — OS 
©"CO "J"" 



T oc © no © 
CCCKNO 
© OS © © OS 
OS — CM T 00 

co_cq_©_cM rr 
cm" co" a." os" -*r" 

CM 



I 

-1^ i 

flsKljl 



t •§ .0 o o 



f.3 

11 
B S'3 S 

If S a a :f.WfcwOOC 

r- 4>CT*r^— r C fli fu «i -1 



S v > 

3 



S ? o V 
3 o of 
q"o"o"o 



,JJs§ifi'lj : !s 111 II 

3 o 4> Si £-iS> 



.2-= o « 2 S^iSSSSS 
2 -a "£ -3 g- « t— cc 2^*^5*5 

H x 7; crj co cc 



198 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehahilitation 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1952-53 

Special Fund Receipts 


$40,867.44 
626,758.00 
500.00 
37,402.29 
7,269.14 


$3,105.35 
303,050.00 


Budget Credits 


319,964.13 
1,722.83 




$712,796.87 


$627,842.31 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 



Total 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equioment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Total Program Expenditures 

Other Expenditures 

Total Disbursements. 



Departmental and 
Financial 
Administration 

$141,037.20 
4,299.31 
4,945.60 
4,788.76 
1,873.30 
9,819.01 
8,309.13 
2,224.50 
3,665.13 
28,549.93 



$209,511.87 

Supervisory and 
Consultative 
Services 

$193,963.07 
19,256.41 
3,977.3'. 
16,789.24 
5,652.95 
4,255.28 
2,799.93 
1,510.19 
2,520.72 



$250,725.14 

Administrative 
Services 

$84,250.33 
16,973.92 
3,293.79 
5,597.49 
444.38 
1,645.60 
2,066.73 
722.50 
122.99 



Administration 



$38,927.98 
76.73 
614.09 
2,412.96 
457.51 
202.42 
670.51 
155.00 
275.60 
1,456.50 



$45,249.30 



Placement and 
Guidance 

$173,719.67 
6,197.11 
4,744.13 
14,544.87 



834.51 
1,734.54 
95.00 
401.32 
12,350.72 



$214,621.87 



Case 
Services 



$285,231.99 



$115,117.73 

Library Extension 
Services 

$50,903.31 
202.30 
888.81 
475.22 
303.02 

2,049.90 
798.27 

2,249.00 
19,049.69 

1,289.40 



$285,231.99 



$78,208.92 

$653,563.66 
585.89 



$545,103.16 



$654,149.55 



$545,103.16 



Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury. | 


$20,868.31 


$78,854.83 


Balance, June 30, 1954 1 

1 


$37,779.01 


$3,884.32 



Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1954 



Source or Purpose 


Towson 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


Coppin 




R 


ECEIPTS 







Balance Forwarded from 1952-53 
General Fund Appropriation. . . . 

Special Fund Receipts 

Budget Credits, Fiscal Year 1954 

Total Funds Available . . 



$29,020.30 
827,612.00 
139,286.95 
51,579.96 



$1,047,499.21 $464,850.47 



$12,390.04 
360,016.00 
61,586.65 
30,857.78 



$13,619.68 
302,514.00 
59,510.42 
13.365.51 



$389,009.61 



$9,240.75 
292,584.00 
78,261.32 
12,906.23 



$392,992.30 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Administration 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Instruction 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Dietary Services 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees 

Food 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Plant Operation and Maintenance 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees 

Fuel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Total Program Expenditures 

Refunds 

Activities Association 

Athletic Association 

Breakage Fee Account 

Other 

Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance 
Returned to Treasury 

Balance, June 30, 1954 . 



$101,115.67 

4,258.62 
4,859.49 
978.23 

186.37 
4,431.27 
4,032.59 
3,915.61 
1,509.89 
1,353.93 



$126,641.67 



$425,837.86 
3,475.52 
873.98 
897.37 

1,794.79 
950.10 
5,626.27 
4,443.59 
15,453.05 
50.00 



$459,402.53 



$66,827.71 
1,256.75 
82,504.61 

87.41 
948.28 
4,705.49 



$156,714.11 



$133,288.26 
2,491.70 
17,586.92 

985.20 
32,803.38 
16,159.16 
10,773.31 
5,340.48 
6.00 



$219,434.41 

$962,192.72 
3,177.95 
24,353.00 
12,632.00 
2,319.92 
30.18 



$1,004,705.77 

$4,743.37 I 
$38,050.07 



$38,980.88 
957.34 
722.99 
385.92 

936.80 
1,635.47 
2,184.90 



1,947.84 
1,248.79 



$49,000.93 



$196,358.24 
2,720.81 
342.88 
1,138.48 

476.20 
1,024.77 
4,358.40 

243.45 
8,508.26 



$215,171.49 



$33,927.83 
3,772.25 
45.028.19 



119.51 



$82,847.78 



$52,190.96 
141.54 [ 
6,499.80 I 



13,346.50 
5,491.21 

745.00 l 
2,881.31 ' 



$81,296.32 

$428,316.52 
6,900.21 
5,993.79 
3,982.53 
905.27 
9,008.07 



$41,239.54 
2,123.87 
1,785.72 
192.19 

383.68 
1,953.10 
740.23 



1,445.50 
1,155.46 



$51,019.29 



$145,141.90 

589.83 
141.58 
685.45 

1,154.58 
151.17 
5,043.41 
4,183.03 
6,058.03 



$163,148.98 



$20,573.95 
1,100.00 
33,617.87 



881.49 
1,425.18 
7,109.73 

445.77 



$65,153.99 



$41,764.46 



6,972.88 

462.22 
13,203.79 
5,201.64 
85.00 
1,785.21 



$69,475.20 

$348,797.46 
1,264.00 
5,702.18 
2,664.70 
745.00 
80.00 



$455,106.39 ! $359,253.34 



$2,920.77 
$6,823.31 I 



$20,041.70 
$9,714.57 



$40,655.96 
2,155.00 
971.27 
223.63 

191.71 
1,018.24 
1,066.45 
36.00 
265.50 
620.58 



$47,204.34 



$113,319.67 
400.00 
119.05 
184.09 

2,511.71 
62.60 
2,829.15 
3,473.50 
3,471.14 



$126,370.91 



$26,092.20 
300.00 
54,304.28 



239.61 
368.70 



$81,304.79 



$60,613.93 
200.00 
13,818.99 

414.79 
21,618.34 
6,076.41 
224.57 
271.78 



$103,238.81 

$358,118.85 
153.00 
3,695.58 
1,757.10 
560.00 
197.12 



$364,481.65 

$20,568.97 
$7,941.68 j $3,260.82 



Note: This.statement excludes general fund revenue received in 1953-54. 



200 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



co «e 
. ■>* ec 
x co 



Ol o 

d d 



.0910 

d-T* 



e © 

I c © 
: c © 



© «o 

: oc d 

re N 



TCI 

c. ci 



::::§£:: 


• 'HNMOf • • • 

■ iSTjNcq • • • 


• • © 
O 


• f c t eg c ... 




1 00 i> ei © ! 


: ; © 


: >d © oi t' t- ; 


. . . .ecus . . 

. . . . CO tO . . 


,!c«<ccec . . 

.©««-"N . . . 


. . © 
. . © 


.•<?•© t © : ) 

-C C CC kC 3-. 



© © c © 
© © © © 
d d d s 

1§§! 



• m m • • • 
. ^ _ . . 




: : : : :g 


§::::::: ::::::: 


oct^ ' 
"-I** . . . 

t- . . . 


1,904 
,719 


; ; '. .o* 
: : : :§ 


©_ ; ; " i ; '. \ 

© 

© : . ....... 



C£ T}' lO T CO UO •-< 

X O " K !C t^Ci 



— — 0) C) © © «C © 01 

-r co d t~ t- co co d d d x t- oi d oc d co © oi 
x <c co *x C CO CO 0J © © 
fh x_ © co — o j r~ <e co_ o © 
d c" co' o i* d co* oi d co" 



©__ I© 5£ <© CD » io ( 
— do-f*r so 



©©©©©©© 
doddodo 
© © q © © © © 
3 ©. ©. ©. * ©„ ©_ 
co'dd'oj t^" © © 
— l0 o — oc OJ 



OOP 



S? c o - 

n 



"TJ be 
c c c 

Q ess 



g 

H § 

T3 *3 



E 
c 

8 
I 



"5 "a 



111 ;S 

■ i. O CI a> he 

^•O-g e»43 



'.s :'c'5 ? u c c 

c u.S'O 5 c & -CS 



- 



So. 



C es 2 a — 
__.£ > C 



life 

5 O CJ 



5 J 

III 
li 

SOI 



g 

il 

1 G 



gz. 



© 1- O^" O CJ 4> 



2 = ^ 



'I c *5~2.2 
■.2 5 cs « * 



■£ u cn c C 

; ft oq h) O O 



Maryland State Department of Education 



201 







04 
irt 


• oo en 
t>ac 


• ■ • -©eo • • • eo ©©eg • - • oo 

• ■ • • eg eg • • • m © <-i ■ ■ -oo 




© 






eg 

CM 

co 


■ d co 
. fc» eo 
. eg er 


916. 
295. 

732. 

,706. 
,983. 
,663. 

,769. 


674 






$181, 


a* 


^to eg -"-i eo h 
eo hh 


00 




ooo • 
■ o o o • 


CO 

°i 




eg • ©co © 

5? . ©to © 




© 
© 




: © © © : 

. ©© © . 
.eoua . 


in 
eo 
t- 




;© ; :cgcg ::;;:;;;;:;;;© 

© . .©eg © 

© . . eo ©^ 




in 
t- 






<N 
00 




eg* co* 
** eg 




eo" 
eo 




•ye- 


•>* 
** 








*v 






«<f 




■ t- eg oo • • -eg • • • •© -co^oj© • • -ooo • 
■Nf h -co • • • • © • eg t- co © • • ©eo • 




eo 
© 






$1,144,014 




$ 1,455. 

2,337. 
307,427. 

6,409. 

8,000. 

' '44. 
9,412. 
4,504. 
2,927. 

1.486' 
336,605 




$680,559 




. . . .© 

. . . .© 


oo 




© © . . . 

co © • • • 




© 

CO 




$230,000. 


$231,590 




$1,589. 
230,000. 




$231,589. 




© . . . . 
© . . . . 


© 
eo 


O ©eg • • • -COT* • ■ ■ •© 

© • © — i • • • • en co • • • ■© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


to 


$425,000. 


$481,555. 


$ 764. 

7,145. 
2,447. 

6,939. 
15,719. 

1,235. 


© 

to 


$35,000. 




©©©©© 
© © © © © 
©ddd© 
© © o © o 

© © © U5 ©^ 


,517.72 


©eo©egtvcgoc©ocTi<cg©oceo©©©eo— icg©©eg©©oc©x© 

p^XH[»^rtNin(C«Ou1^COfflN^ffl«OHOC«OXO 

nidrtt^Lih t-' co' us en" ©' eg eg eg to © © eg' -*f eo eo' eo' © co to © © © 
cet~rc**L.oeoo]-*o]«-'~©oieoeo©cc**-*©eoxco©eoc©coi.o 
t~c<iTj<T}<Tfeo'^ , ©eMt^T)<^reot^oj©to tt i.o cc © co © -*r co o c- 


,539.29 


eg eo 
>* eg 

«» 


$2,521 


•*»<Xegi~iigt~»-Ht-iOCDCg NhXh CT. ■*TT'-<eC©'-iCCC£'- 

<-i ©eo^-H eg .-h ~ eo eo 
eo —i eg eo 

39- 




$1,165 



OS o' 

Inn 



far^2 5." 



bi 
c 






~_ 

'5 


J 


able. 


n 


— 


c 


> 


'5 


o 

33 


o 
c 


> 



5-3 H 



c £ £ 

O 0) >> 

I go 

< 



O > CT3 



b 

o 

o 

««t. 
c E* 



Is 

CCS c c 



a> 3 



c o 
;3Q 
'5 "j u 



2 o w 



. .fa 
E||« 



tajC/3 & 

c c * 
o q 



2 oj E >,*3« 

^c.£-«.5'Efe 
O <U 3_£ 5 £ — 

fa dq H _ Q fa CC v: 



t£-3 



O 

<D.iT3< 3 

6-1 o 

;P^ct;^CDi^fa 



c3 



-5 E . 



- c 

o ce 



5 a»-c 
fa2< 



sifaS 

c< 3 . 2 c o 
-< £ § £ 

"c-Ie's 

c £ £.Sci 

III S| 

j O tf « P 



202 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



hied 



.co© 
.cow 



m <j> 
m *-i 



lOMOeo 

«£>t~<N 



I (MOO 

i t~ ci 



© t © 
oioao 
cqcco 

i-i CI 



0) 

"5 



O 

<x> o 
o> o 



CM CO I 
i«iO< 



f OMiflOflfirfHOh 

o»-i<ot~o) co co <r> io t- 



.-H-CJtf W 

©oc*ri«.-< 



Hcccotoao 

lO WOOOMO 
»M iH © CO «5 CO O* 
CO 



« S Q 



E 

c 
'3 

cr 

M 
e 

U 

c 



B 

a 
'5 

o 



>> a 



2 u 5 



T3 
C 

« B 
9>.3 

z 1- 



be* 1 

!&3 



•r, .-2 » 



C b 
OT3Q 

SS* ■ xi 

Id rig 

*§3lll 

, a; a) M O 2 « 



ii 

o 



■2 mE 



3 

pq 

2 o 



o *» *g c s 
,9 M-do Scy, 



8 

. rc« 

5 O "S _ 



1«3 



& 2 g « » rt g » 

guoi£ acumen 



'.Ha -a " 
u 5 « « S 



4 s 3 E « 

« mH § £ „ 

S 3 33.&0 
o« to 3 m 3 PQ 



a 2 2 « i> 
ii a a a ~ 

S2g""£2« gc* 3|f EEE 



cEg 
c o C 

•5 o a) 

U S3 B 



iMaryland State Department of Education 



203 



qJJifj-XjBjuauiajg 

pauiqmoj 


O 

cm 


- 


OS 








IBUOpBOO\ 

pus qJiiH 




o 


oo 


— cc — — 


CM <-• CM •-< —i CM H CM 


IOHNNH — — — 


•y Schools 


XjBjuaiuo|3 JdqjQ 


CO 


CM 
lO 


<# 


•-i G CM t> T 
CM -i 


MM-'* iS Mt-WX 


<T> cm ir. as eo — > co 


jaqosaj, 


x> 


ie 
cm 




l© 

cm 


- : : 


• • -iflW ■ CM • 


•CON 05 CM • 


a 

e 
3 
£ 

it 


-auo 


a 


LO 










... .00 ... 


s 


XjBiuauiajg jbjoj. 


00 
CM 

cm 


CM 


t« 


CM — 


N«-0)X -NX(CX 


OlXt-OJO — OS CO 



pajoioo ibioj. 







q3}H-<OBQuatua|a 
pautqtuo3 


>* 




o 
so 


Tf ^ CM ■ >-0 


O IT5 •fl" CO LO 


■ < •— i cm 


i-h • -«eo ■ 


00 






JBUOIJBOO \ 

puB aoiuas 


OS 












11'.'. 






J= 

o 
73 
J= 
be 

s 


jomas-jomnf 


sr. 

55 


CM 


OS 


x cm t> ia 


X CO CM UO CO 


CM ^ CM 00 IO 


CO CM ■«? CM 


cceof 




joiunp 


<7i 


CM 


t» 

00 


— ^« • - 


■— i CM CO >— ' CM 


• ■ eo ce 


IO -rHiH • 


00 • • 


White School? 






t- 

cc 


CM 


eo 

rr 


OS X CO rH lO 


OS X lO CO X 


cm t uo eo eo 


00 00 00 U5 CM 


o f 


y Schools 


XjB^uatuaig 

jaqio 


t- 
IO 


99 
t- 


00 
CO 


t- uo en ce x 

CM CO "J" 


IS CO CM CO 


X XO> X CM 

~*T4 CO 


OS O OS X X 


CO iO o 

O0-H-' 


jaqoBaj, 




CM 




IO 
CM 




■ cm ■ m »h 










ce 
c 

£ 

• 


-auQ 




lO 




IO 




CM • • • 












XjBiuauiaja ibjoj, 




99 


X 
99 
Tf 


c~iao>coos 

CM CO 


CO X CO C- t> 


OS OS OS X CM 
CM -h CO 


OS — OS CO o. 


00LOC 






C 
00 
CO 


99 
99 




CM CM © O OS 

co ^ co 


X -h C- O o 
-*CM CM CO 


— cm o o eo 
eo cm — — t> 


— — CM — 

t>-K-l»-l — 


CO O 
— i — 


o 


q3;H l^ox 


CM 


CO 




© OS CO CM CO 




CM CO CO f lO 


Xf iflt-M 




o 
= 

< 


XjBiuauiaia iBjox 


o 
o 

X 


BQ 


99 
50 
CO 


as uo — eo 

CM uO CO fH rH 


X — t>COU0 
iH CM — CM CO 


Cl~Nf O 
03 CM ■— ' ' t- 


X OS CO OS X 


os to 
eo cm — 


























IBJOX PUBJQ 


3 


o 


t~ 
ce 


*r co co eo 

CO CO — — 


Of oox 

CM CM CM eo 00 


— tj. x co eo 
eocM-H — x 


CM00X — 
OS CM CM CM 


UO CO 
f CM — 



be it — 

5 B*J 
= C cC 

<<C2 



5= c_||'i 
■3 a ca cui o 2 



>» 
i3 
5 
o 

M 

a> w w *j 
S3 CS O Q> O 

C = = 



£ « E- 
C 3 ^ o « 

-v7,7..- 



c r- 03 

S.2 o 



204 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



m 


© 

00 


oo 
t- 


00 

o 


cm to CM iO f 
0C © *f © © 


f H51CO 
CO o 


eo to cm to 

i-i CM CO 1- 00 
O ■ © X CO © 


eo © ifl i/5 

to 


toco -r 


s 


Tf 




60 


CO to h 
i-i cc to 


u 


o 
to 


~r 


to 




■HlH CI 


i-l lO 


to 


CO 


oys 


,334 


,378 


,956 


tO^HCOtOiC 

ic os io io 

U5 O CO to 


O CM to i- 
O © t- © 
l~ C4 © t> 


eo oo i-i m 

00 lO CO t> 
XX_Xf o 


iCt to 
© to to toco 

C- 1> iO 


ot c 

to t- CI 
CM X to 


OQ 


to 


m 


cc 
•v 


co co © 


iH M CM 


— to 


to 


eo 


"3 


,820 


,556 


~~ 

to 


oct^ic^cn 
cm t co in 

CMi-hCM^©CM 


Tf CO © © i— < 

eox©t-eo 


tO -t CO CM O 

<r. oc to co to 

t> I- ICX o 


to .-i o to o 

Kf WHO) 

co © a. © ©_ 


© t~ T 

© eo eo 

eo r- <N 


o 


<N 


H 


CM 
CM 


a. 

CJ 


CO 

© 


t- t~ X i-l 


CO C-J i-l f 


fH CC — C) 


eo th 


to H H 



cm © 
o eo 

f-H t- 



Of (C t~- NhWhh 

f-HltO:W H H CC 

i-i oo -r eo © —i — > 



CM i-i hh to t 

eo x eo to to 



o ic m to « sr. to i-i 

— i h 0C CM to CM X © 

~r t- a-, 1- wax 



iCCOfN WOCWt-H 

i^cMOeoo ict-xt-to 
eo-^eoiflo t-noocc 



cm x m i-i -H 

© ih CM lO C— 

iccnirtoo 



i.o o co eo cm cc eo t- 
oc cc c f c x cr. io 
rn-Ht^tc © © © 



o © co ©©~rt-© x© — xcm rt<©©c^ic inicmoio ci © x 

_ ^ ciCOtCltC 01 X © X © NH05XCI OS f X to t- —t--H< 

CO lO t> ''v^l.CMOX^ NWHH^f KSf-CMI 1 t^TtCfiO tocx 

x os x x ■<* eo i-< us cm o to cmc-m-*© iahnhh atn 



WulWKH lOMfHH >C CC CC O HMU5WH iO © iO 
lOHXKtO C'CHHt-. XCJtH-H" to-.M-N Wf c 
© CO © -h CM O © X CM CI t- -< O to Oh^hM t- X lC 



© i-O H 



'MhhiC CM LO CJ H O os-hhi-ih t- C) — 



tO HHCCCt- 

eo © t- os os iti 
oo h os_eo_x to_ 

X ©to H 



to © eo eo cm 

O CM lO U5 

f wt»Kia 



to to coco to 
ccmcoh 
eo o cm i-> x 



©■h* ©© © eo t~ 

os os t- © eo "t to t> 

°. H .' s . t i w . cj io 

OrlHHH X 0J — 



ic t- t-woiocx o o t> *r cc c eo © © uo -<©</:©© x to cm 

CM © iftKt-hn © O O) to CM t^OffinX C0 X f CC © © i-i X 

i-i © c- cm ■«« © h whccwx ©liceo-HTj- — ■ co © eo © ©x© 



2 be 



«3 



iO CC CM CO © 

eo © t> h ic 

t> X © h 



t- CO © — 
CM X CM © CM 
©_©_0J ©_t> 

eo CM CM CM -f 



© CM CO © X 
© CM © uC t- 

HTfNHN 



MAIOtHCO ©CMCO 

a oto to eo Hj> x -T 

uC CJ CC cC i.C ifirtX 



-h t- © co ft>©©eo fioeoxt- eo©i*iot> eo x cm 

©©t~iOit ©[-CMCO© C-XCM©eO © ©. t ©OC© 

© co © — if •^©xeccM XTCOC-co uo©x*rco c-co© 



X t> IC CM CM 

*+H» 

++++ 



UO Tf CO CO t> 



t-L:HHt- — x co x -hi © t> © -H- i.c ucx©©eo © ©»C 

■H>CO©©C0 CMuO-hi-h-CJ t-OXiCH xeicccx COt-CC 

©^CM^-f/ cm_©_ Hto^cseo©^ tc^x^ec^oj eo »-<cm cm^csx^ wh« 

■ W iC H TJOJ1CNU5 LC K H H CC © 



2 2 

os 



- 

Hi 

=: c ca 
<<CQ 



^77 

_ 1- u 

d) o ej • *j 

CS rt O 0)O 



- CO 



O 

c"" 



_ E 4 

93. Si O 



Maryland State Department of Education 



205 



,258 


,050 


,208 


«5 « X O n t~ tO C5 t~- 
m tfl M f <£J CO«irtO) 
OJ t> CM M iONh 


0"5 OS i/5 t— 
uO X tO — 
n — c 


M f t~ t 
Ol to O — ~ 

n ^ oi co cm 


t- 1- — 
t~ — o 

CO CO 




00 













MtOVJC O © t~ Oi 

cc i- cm n — < *r cm i 



• OS — i CT> « f hhXM CO X X 
•N«U50 <C t- O M « t~ CM O 
CM CM -i t O n CM CO CI CO CO 



co us cm cm -*t lo co x n co o 
ia i - x cr. x " en cm co er. 
m o « t f co ^ — en >-o cc 



• x © x omm 
icj-eoer. cm co -i- to »r n to to 



to o n 'X m enenxcom 
oj ii xrictffi ^<t}<^htji(£> 

1< O iO CM >0 CM HHOOlOW 



■CMtOCOX CJ it CT. iC rj" CO OC tO 

• mxi-otn imtoioo) cn co to 

PJNNOl OC O) CO t CO tO lid 



^ LO t- O (^OiiXIC 

x co cm x x hwoo^ 
to cm o cj ri^Hcntoec 



teoonn 
cc x °& ^ cc 



3 

o 



<exen-*.i 



tO t~ e<j X^CntCt- 

■ toecin oinooN 



X CO © T CM Ci © tO CM CJ 
n Tj«a5COXW5 W^fWOtfi 
CM Hf 3iNif CM CI CO X LO 



■HiflXifl ^HMCMX OWN 
■Ht-HN ONNXO NiCtC 
■JOtTfif O t lS to n Ol X 



t-en^^© cnocMCMcn 
Tfucosooto OTfHxn 

« it a X CM CM CO X LO 



• CO CM t> LO 

• tO LO CO 



o n en us 
loin^toi 
ovtcxtc 



icr. to 

' <T. X 
iftX 



© en lo co en er. to to • 
cm en en to en it to < 



^1* CM ^t ii 00 

O X CM tO CM 



>i tj* CO 

co uc 
cocn t- 



g»SH>S 

= c « a « c3cjj=0£; 



c _ 



E 
o 

_ 1- >- M 

01 O C9 • ZT 



S fci (*■ C H C^c£ 
99 i* .£ 3 5 tSJc* 



111 

£££ 



a 6 

o 



a E 

"3 o 



£ 

SIC) 
S co* 
c - 

-a 

O ii0 



C3 



S ee C 



£ 09 



c t> 

~ t 

"S be g 
£ a5 o 

S.Sc 

c cOto c 
o H io 1 , 



« d.; 



«3< 



"CM : 



^ ^ < ~ >o 
S E S c S - 

S>5 8 * 



206 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



H 

3 

C 

V 

= 

I 



<N O 
uO © 



t- eo id co *r 



O 

05 <-l •-« (M 



X -r CO T T 



2 6 



5 -i 

03 



E 



E- 

73 £ 



Si 



- CO. 



o-~£ 



— w 

t-S oj 1i> S 

^ i~ ~ Se^sa 



E , 



>. 

■'6 
2 «j 



££5 



S'o.S 



S J £ o o « a 
g < a -s C ~ 



1 ^ a * 
in <72 



as a, 



o i. < 2 i 



3 

si 



3.2 c - 
'-' z - ~ 



8? 



saaqoBaj, 

5U8J3J^ia JO 



3: * X K ^ X ^ 



(M 



' — — OJ 



ia co 

03 CO 



c-os ee x 

X C ■<? "T 

— ■<* oj 



•"*:m-* — <o>) ^ t co <-i 



urt^r-s ia c. — 

hN« OJ 



co 
oj co 



co «e «— — 
— tt in 

CN OJ 



— x co ■ ««? <e os x i-o os os to i 

•os os os ■ x ^ uo c- <o uo to oj ■ 

■<}• OJ ^- hMhh ^•COCO'Hi 



f- o 

z o 

IS 



A .-CI m5 c 
3'S - 
<D~ c 3 — o: 

'JS CO . . . — *z *z <u 



c 

^ c 

OJ < 



5^ 



- 
s: 



S3 
<* 



o sr^ 

— °£ 



5 g - 

c?E"3 

> O es • fi S 
5.Sf --3 °- g 



"3 3 ■ 



> ■** » 05 00 .i- t— i c 00 



■ S od 



5 55 5; E 



ts >> S3 «J 



£ E §•§■"£ -g 



•a 

la 



v 

•3 
3 
u 

Ht 
Z flJ 

o • 



Maryland State Department of Education 



207 



juajajjiQ jo 
jaqiunN pnoj, 



~-o© 

OMX 



CM >0 



O *f Oi CM 

ait-cn 
cm C-3- 



oo <o eo ^> 

tO xf CM 

o m ih co 



CM <C C7> 

M co o 

CM -H 



CM N 

— 

01 CI 



> _ 

E o 
z o 

II 



■8 .v-! 



rsa 

1 
3.2 



fie* 



u 
S 
S 

2 « 
u ca 



^73 



O .! 



3 b 

n 5 

B t — 3 «a « !> Q 

g > * S . . .£ b£ 
h « ca 2£££ o $.2 

****** * * 



«, E .2 
■§2g 

o j= a 

00 CP %4 

•si 5 

ft* 

v u 3 e * 



O OJ cj o 



o 

<T « 

ca c 
Sec 

fil 



3U3J3JJIQ JO 



0C CM 
t>CM 



•oceoco ec«*rHOO»ioeoocn 



cc x ro ■ c* 00 Oft 99 Oft © OS 
TCMCMiO ■ O CO CM CO O t> CO 
COrtif iC^i CO^-HCO 



■CCt> COt-CM 



CMCMXCMirtt>0CCO-*5O 
•flOOt^WiCMOtfiO) 

Tteoeo^-HCMTfeo^H 



•CO «t>«XHXlHj.M 
CM CO CO «^ ~* CM CO H 



© uo -«r 



05 t- »-h c- iG CM CM 



z o 

8« 



a^ * 



J J! |J 

. - - ~ 

o « s 5 
p *j *i *j 



■9 

s 

i — a * — »■> 03 

if lill i 

ca a; o ',7, a, c 

« . e to 3 t^J? 
73 co .S -™ ca T3 < 

■ ---si 

m 



J= ra 



- - c o _ N 
ea-nw ? i>> 2 * 



is** 



^ ca *j cy_^ . b 
= c; ca-o £ S3 g 

3 Sv3 



s 

I 

ea 



w a 



3 c if j= ca ee = 



0- * 



§ ca ^ a ji o = 

JliJli 

_ -Okkw 



c c 

o a> 

11 

3 ^ 
13 — 

H o 

CO 

Oca 

4) 

ca 'S 



■a * 

« c 

II 



oO - 
co =: 



r-cM ■ 

o _ o c 



208 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



ifgf! 



b 



.£ Si 



•8 --3 

3 2 c 

.si 5 



S t- 1 o> — 

r . >0 

PQ 



2* 



|1 



w .3 

0) c 




ccfinMNccNO 



tXf fit Mt 



6? 

Ed § 



.£ as 



DO C 
■Ot> 



H C 

■z o 

8% 



3? 



WW 



> t & 



as O «-t3 X 

!_ tt — j_) 0> t. o 



IIS 



tJ £ 



< 3 



2 2 

O OJ 

CO o 
<3 



w ^ n o . • 5- >- ri o 



oa gr • 



c fi 



w co 
a S"g 
PQ 

S o ID 
£ cu.2 

PQ 



w^O ft? c -<Q ffi 



c S'o t*ti 



at? 

H 

c£ 
£W few 



. -S^Noi as c£ 




Maryland State Department of Education 



20 



si 
g 
"3 

ft 



-o 
c 

J5 
>» 

— 

O 

3> 



Ijsii 

— Eh 



M ~j M >c 



l" - k :i :i-r Mr:* 



Z 

J 
J 

o 
as 
z 
a 



b 
il 



.5 S3 



H O 
Z O 
O -3 



CO 



2 M So 



3 a* a* u cs 



£.2 aS> „. 

«K CO CO CO HE-" 



•a "OS'S 3 

llii 
mi 



•3 02 

y § t^U C C 

a) r w >, £. «- >- 
*j aco C « « i « 



; >, a-o © « o 



g . 



■O 3 (D.2 ~ _~ 



o 



o> c >> brr Sccc' D 
< CQUQCOCO 



T3 

§b 

co 



t- kO -P5 -NtONnTf • >-l ■ X CO 



■ fl ■ eg 



•hw -ooec t-io 



H O 
Z O 

6^ 



ill 
b£-~ +3 
« 3 g 

111 
= >>b* 



H « > >C 
Z CS O « 

3 



CO 



. > 

•CJ ■ U o 
5 "3 y 



~ _ 3 

a§-s 

^co b 

£ e « 
3 F m 



c 

v; 2 a 



"2 big 

rt -b 3i> o ^ r 9 ^ 



J= 3 § * 



o 

ox.; 



3 r, 



c 3 

ess: 



CJUU uoco 



2 

3 a 3/ 

Jll-s 



"35 >/0 



cc :o 

2 3 « A c 
2 co v r 2 co 
■S 

w v d >- 
^ia|° 
°S »: E^ 

— w O u 

£.2 2 o c 



*3 c 

^ 3^ 

Ofljt o« 



210 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



c 

cd 

~>. 
u 

as 

>— 
O 

0) 



§b 

r 



b 

s s 



<7> M 
— I- 



I! 



t* o 

Z O 

8« 



— • - 

O 03 "O 

I Sal 



o . 

Sift* 

esq 

u co«o 
c * i.S * 
a » c 73 f 

~ i_ u a _ 




« 2 3 
3 3:02 



s|i|2llil 

. oj v: E- h !> !> > 



pq 



DO 

< 

O 



— -o*3 « 

2e5|-S 



■a 

w 



b 
— ^ 



c S 



■ oc 
c n 

M C 



Ho 

z o 

sa 



ZC^Q 



z g I 

8 = « 



OS 



bC5 



CO 



II. 

Ma 

III I 

K M *5 « 



t3 H 

C Z 

5 § 

d O 

? e 

o z 



E 

3 

z 

■ 

c 

o 

A* 



K 5 

8&V 



* K 8 b 

cju — f,— • > C u 



^2 



22 
5.2 



pq 



Maryland State Department of Education 



211 





Total 
Number 

Different 
Teachers 


















CO 










c 
9 
J 


Ele- 
mental 


a 


o 




jhch 


E 
C 

W 


nder 
irter 


Co 










b 
a 






in urs 






"3 






Tol 










Numb< 


of 

Schools 










Total 
Numbe 


of 

DifTerer 
Teachei 






§b 






S« 

w 






b 






i c3 






- C 

s 


White 


Enrollmen 


Kinder- 
garten 




Nursery 






13 






Tol 




Number 


of 

Schools 


County 



CM <71 
CM — 



X i/3CCt-COt~© 1 *rCMt~eOi.OeOt~-<reO''J'iO 
X C- CM — CM CO CO CM CM 

00 CM -h 



-h cn m cm o 

— i iO CM CO 



OC CO 
CM -i 



— CM CM X CM t~ CM CM CM CO CM 



©cm ~HTi<t-ia • © 

CO CM CM ~h t> t~ t "- 



oo it NLiHLcnoiNLixortteooftNi- 

CM »— » *-h Ot»t-HMM(OTft-XN<faiOOMO 
C- 01 X uO CM CO CO M X © CM X CM CO CO t~ CM 



si 3 £ 
«0 E «: 



CV . 

cs c"rt"5 cs es S 



b^ 



S3 c cu ea os bJ d>-C £ g<5 1 2i2"C*S»2K 



C) C4 

t- 1- 

X X 

© © 



cmc-ow*. 
eo t» ci 

CM 



■©-« CM • CO 

■ eo — c- • io 



CO CM i-t 



ifl CM CO 



CM -I 
CO ©, 

CM 



iflMNMN-<t»M -CM-*© ■ • © • t- 
rJt-OWMf-XtO ■ CO © © • -CM -fH 

co eo»o • • 



•c-x 
• eo 



• eo io 

CM CM 

■ X 



uOXCM©CM«-<t^CM-* XfflTf f hO 

r)iU5H^lO-<eCCMiCOMC)a>iOt^CO 
COO CM «->-« HOi «- i •— ' CM 



CMXOicMco^kCcO'-'eoocriCMeo — co»-" 



b J 

i s 



« o c n 



H PQ H 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



1 s i ggisg iigag ijgis s§§ 

s s = ~ 



I] 



i § i spsi mm mm m*B m 



1 1 1 mn nm ?m mm m 



I i i liP* ijsfi SSSHi iliil III 
s 3 s ""a - -*>- s a - 



1 

S|| 



1 § I ft@E. IsIIH lilSS lilli ssl 

5 5 5 PSg - - ott-«-0 S5 a?- 



II 



8 



I 8 I §1151 HMs ISiSS 155(1 85 

« OC ^ JO An*H04 KCrtKC C T — ^ «3 CO M N kOiCM 



1 1 1 iiiii mm mm mm m 

o cj n t- oc ac — — jc^m — ■>? — — — *r — — — — to e* *h 



i § i lists uiai ggiii tiiii isi 



oc cx«iXM c. ~ cj t- — t- l.- — — x x ~ so »~ — i 



I I I HISS IPal llilS IIIIS sIS 



I 5 1 sss- 



i i ! lij 1 11 1 1 



pi 

is 
I 

a 

II! 

1 

1 
I 





Maryland State Department of Education 



213 



OJ IH — 



to —c uO tO OlCh 



1" Wf-nKf] aCMrtX 

o i-c u: cm ■<»< eo im »h t- 05 



f IC3IXO tO OS x 

i- oc t- x -r to us 
1- os to 
rt M t- 



MCO 

Meo uses ^ lc lc 



fr- COifttO-*-}" HiflOf <o 

oo o os co co >o <* mmon 
o-i tct-NOSH eoioosicco 



' OJ CO CO 00 t> 



• f <N OS O) 
•OS k to to 

• to U5 T «0 



OS to t- OS W >-0 .-i t- 
01 OS O OJ O tO "T fr- 
tO"Tl- XI- — ' ~ OS 



CO xf -Ji x* to 00 

t- t-XHOH 



HHt-mo) ■ co co x to Mccoxt- to -f 

co to r- eo ^ hckoi oc^t-^^i o-i oo 

o h co t- • t- os to cm to os uo os o. xx 

T T J\] iO OS • f-H 00 C- rj< i-h O T © OltOT 



3§ 



t> © X OS CM HNt-NO to x to os fr- X -* OS OS CM to OS CO 



o co os co xj» os 

CM wo co to m CO 

»-i to X US i-i 

co to to US r-l 



us us o os t~ 

X CO i— ' x}* tO 
O-HrlCOOO 



© OS t> t- t> 

OS X tO 1-1 r-t 

USCO-l'fr-X 



o eo co x © iflinx 

fr- © CO CO OS OS >o t- 
US X X X OS CO us c 



00 to CO O OS CO fr-fr-i-IXUS OXH^fM 0J t CO xj" OJ OsOsCO 

osost-xfto us^Htoosi-H eo os ii co usm©usus moif 

X COtOXXUS Tf< to i~i i~> tO WOXHN irtMXrf O OiOO 

© aao^xio (oro^x^qx u \. u ^ f i'~ , . ec . ih co to e>s t-toto_ 

•<* X i-H CM US CO tO CM i~> tO N iH lH -H «H X CO i-t 



of 



eoccxxuo xosxous eotoocoi 



X X © OS US 
X OS US CO X 



o to to OS X 

X X CM CO CO 

fr^o^eneo t> 

fr- CO CO X OS 



Os X © CO 

CM05"teoi< 

rtt»t-KH 



x x i/s Hinoi 

CO X — X OS © i~i X 

t ~".°. l °. H . M . »r CM^to^ 

CO CM CM CM CO fiOC) 



•-> be 



US CO X 



iXxfPSCO CCOSfr-' 



CO © X fr- CO CM X i 



us t-eo-fx*-! Tf lo co cm io ©couscous hxo^O) x to os 

tO tOCOUOtOCO USXO5C0© OStOi-H^HX i-iOSfr-OSfr- C0OSX 

i-<_ ~ 5 _ , -i 131 ~* cm_oj x^x^oi_ in t~ x_©^uo xfOrnweo x_©us 

US CO fr- fr- 1-t 05NHHUI i-l CO i-H i-H i-H CO H H HlH US CM ft 



II 



US OSXCOXt- X CM i-H CM i-H t-OsX©CO O—nffi 



OS X © X H 
XTf Ht-t» 

osooxh 



oso-ious 

fr- i-H i-l fr- OS 

w N eo ©x^ 
xf CO x to 



XXXC0CO 
CO © CM X X 
US<NXU3 0S 



us oj fr- -n t> ©i-ii-i 

X X X Tf © t- © X 
I" t- X CO i-H XX iC 



il 



fr> 00 00 
rH eo fr- 
X US CM 



x-rust-us os©usus-j< eox©i-ito 



fr- co us to eo 

US X tO -K o 
t-MHOOtO 



X CO-* eg © 
CO © © © © 
i-iUSeOOSfr- 



T ©OS -K — 

COfr-XOS fr- 

i-i os to us us 



CO © X OS fr- 0>XH 
0) CO US 00 00 OS Os fr- 
XXuOtO-K tOXii 



xtous-ro ^o^MOi xNnnec f icf 



<<cct 



= 3 -Mi 



tn U 

cscu-ect s - : ^ - 



if t . 

- k fr- 



ies 
111 

ca o 

£££ 



214 



Ml 

Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



eg — <_ 

eg eg 



oioooia ooooo 

©in — eceg bhxh oc 

eg ec — eei t- «OM<*ec 

oceox^c-- " r . 04 . <0 .^'. c i. 

© eg eg ox — e~ — 

eg c- ec m co ei Tf x cc 
eg eg — 



oooc m e © © © ooo 

© CC © X "»BOXO lOUin 

x m m eg — ec *»• © cc icaf 

XICftH CC CO CO CO X_ X_X_0> 

meiegx oecoox cot- — 

x x o k n Le tc o w eg 01 as 

— cc — 



10 





to 


10 m 


ooooo 


• 


m 


000 


,072 


oc 
to 
eg 


,804 


09 A 00 CJ 10 
09 M — X \jBi 


ec — co t- ec 

CC X X 

— as to — 


■ cj x 


,563 
,510 
,264 
,746 
,078 


xegos 
to t- to 


9 ,920 


5,948 


3,971 


as ec eg oc ec 
eg x t» as 
m ec — 


MLesiOf 
tt 1x1 as — i 
eg — — 


■ t? m a. 
eg as x as 
— ei 


XOt-Mt- 

os as eg to eg 


as to m 

M O t- 

e-i — 






O 





eg 


as 



ec 



o_ 




co 


eg 


t-~ 




as 

09 


1* 

eg 


tt 


TT 


X 


to 



m m o o o 
ec tt as in x 



o o o c o 



0000 mo m 00 000 



to eg tp x — 
to x x e> -r 
— as_eg_o_ in x^ eg co_ cx 

omrreox eg tp — m 

U9 t- — IO T* fc» t- — C~ 

t- to eg — tp eg — 



f won t-nf f k coxtp 

© tp a. ec o«m ec to — 

ocxtp_cc ^*"10>e©0> t- in a 

ot-~t~t~- a f n « ue ec tp t^. 

— m eo eei cgTPxccos moto 

eg — — tp a. — — eg — co eg 










O 


O 


m 


m m m in m 


m m m 


m m in 


mom 




49 
be 


cc 
fr- 
ee 


,979 


tp 

as 

EC 


cow woo© 


as t eg x x 
— eg to — eg 
ec to eg eg © 


m in as 
x x x eg as 
00 — m eg — 


x x to m 
x tp as ec tp 
— eg eg as eg 


eg cj 
— — as 
m to 




5 


ec 
eg 
t> 


,740 


,982 


t^- Os OS OS x# 

— O f OS O 

01— .ec eg 


m eg ©tp as 
m x as 
in ec eg eg to 


t~ eg tp as 
x as to eg x* 1 
eg m eg — as 


,082 
146 
144 
151 
178 


.020 
281 
194 






o> 


tp 


— 


— — eg 






eg 




2 


ntary 


m 





us 


m m 


m m 


© m © m in 


ooooo 


mom 


TE SCHO( 


m 
in 


,896 


in 
in 
to 


— to ec as en 
ec ie t- as 


tp as ec eg eg 
to as m 
t-- — in in x 


ec x x to m 
x to eg ec eg 
'~ © cc^cg xp 


ec eg in m 
as tp to as 
tp os^ to as 


coec x 
© ec x 

CC TJ> t~ 


9 
E 

as 


,924 


to 

c© 
00 


,037 


eg m m as eg 
cc to as in 
— — — ec 


tce-Nico 
ec — e-i to to 
x t~ ec ec © 


x c — 
m — © — 
tp — tp eg t» 


— T cj ec eg 
x eg t uc 
©eg eceg eg 


,571 
*662 
288 


X 




m 

CO 


X 


eg 


— egm 
* * 




— **■ 


00 








10 





IO 


m m m 


O 10 IO O m 


m m 


m m m 


coo 






xp 

eg 
eg 


m 
»■ 

X 


OS 

— 

ec 


— ec t- ec t> 
<#Ht« te — 

TP OS t~ — OS 


tp ec m — e 
x ec m ec 

Ct^Xl^h 


bo »* 00 10 ec 
cc m to eg 

TP — X Tp to 


— m — eg 
xas mecm 
to — to — 


m — 

— T X 

— O X 






X 

TP 
«J 


t> 
ej 
co_ 


,020 


O TP OS tO 

m i~tp m 
to eg eg m 


omt^aso 
as as eg to 
ec m to 


to ec tp as x 
•»r to c- eg m 
t» ec eo co 


ec — co m — 
co t- tp as ec 
O ec — ec — 


eg eg 
a- T x 
in as xj> 






in 
in 


ec 


eg 
x* 


cgec x 




— cc 


to 


eg 



I3 
So 
Or* 



m o m m m m m m m o m m o m m m m m mom 



eg o eg oegmt-co egmoasco 
— eg as ecasxeas megomco 
co tj- — •**co-<rect- t^masco — 



m m cc as m 
x coec t> eg 
x o x — ec 



eg — o "j- m m x 
cx«f o t-oec 
x x as m — ec m o 



m x— « m— — — — 

m eexxc-m x — ec cc 
— ejeco — eg m ^ ec ec t- 



x cc eg m 
x t- eg x x 
m cc ec — o 



eieifeit- cr. to 
— as c m t- x 

xj" — eg eg eg oecc-j 



10 mcomo omomm 00 moo 



o tj< m — — x 

co m co — as co 

as eg x t> x to 

o cc co ec as 

o x* cc m ec ec 



o as as m 
as as ec ec o 
xcacj t> m 

to as m m 
m as m t> 
x i> m m — 



ec eg t> cc x 
x as — eg 
m^x^x^t^co^ 

x m m i" o 
mas o x — 
eg m eg o 



•c e-j er. — m x? m t- 

lc m eg tt x t> o m 

t> as — c-_ 

omoscoas — as *}■ 

X-NCt- C CC CO 

ifiecTttfe; »xf 



io o 10 10 o o m m o m c o m m o m m o o m 000 



eg rji x cc x m 
m x m a. as cc 
co m ec cc ec as 



co — 
— x 



o o as eg • 
c m m — i 
oocemi 



o m as os — 
m — ec as t> 
« w — ecec 

eg o as o co 
to t> ec x ec 
XT — o> x as 



x x ec m -<j> 
co m m m m 
cnoeeftos 

cc ec eg to m 
Tf ec co as 

t> OS X TJ" O 



x ec o m o 
m ec co x cs 
x_ec cc^os^cc 

egmT«xt> 
os — ec m eg 
as m to to co 



o ec m 
m — os 
x_ cc t-_ 

mx o 
tt Tf m 
cc eg t> 



•T3 

■ c 

S C CS CS ft 

<<cacu 



J3J< 
ev t 

ije o £ 



_ 1- i_ 

o o ca " 
es os O cpo 



I'll 
sis 
is is is 



Maryland State Department of Education 



215 



a 

99 
V 
c 

3 
—> 

M 
c 

c 

a 
m 

es 

V 



tt o oo oc io <x> cs nNWf ie 



W-><fit£> U5 O 0C t~ Ol 



ir; oc oc wxowo 



Oi OA 



' C- O OlOiflul^ NOSXCM -V CO t> i 



x 1 1- s> eocs < 



loeooo ooooo 



OJlOO © O ^ I 



lOOO ooo 



t-XXXI> 



OOOO t^NOOX OOO 



oo«oot> ooecoo ooooo 



o^ o o 



ooooo 



iOhO lOOO 



■ 8.2 



I s ^ 
o "3 o 

I Eh CQ E- 



liiii gun 

<<CQUO UUUQfe CKEUjS 



4! O C« ' *J 

as « o 



0) r- «S £ 
I! 2 |l 



SS.X o 

£££ 



C71 C- 
0*H 



a ooo 

C 00 00 00 



"o 



11 
I? 



1 y 

1 sill 



216 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



g «g£S32 




•32 



*«J3g5S : 2£23 SSSS583 ^SSS 

o>oo 



• oooo Soeee 



•g22g gSSSS 



■ooe* — r-ooo- 



SS*g i?2^2- "22 



255 



2" N 



o o us <n S — - w«o< 

^2 S "§ jg~8S; 



o o o r- o t- us o © © 



S^2-S § 



8£S8§ ©3S 



ggS?2| 2£2S3 E3£ 



©0«0-0> WIOMO* 



1§° 



5 

s 



5SSS| SSSiS sss 




f 



Maryland State Department of Education 



217 



c O O oo 
CO so "i "0 — 



MU5K5 - - 



■ io o et 



000*50 



o co o 

ci lb ci 



o o c; o uo 



icuioON o:cos oco«co — ^- -r 
d c>i io - « oo so *o — d d -r — ~ ib dcet 



no cceon 



OOOlOOOC 

i-H ~ d m d ci 
— cj so EC 



o o o o o 

0C 00 tO 00 00 



ooooo .- G — 

C.'TCOOON <M -T CO 
00 CM — — C» N CJ CI 



■dec 



o o so o o 

CJ SO CO — CJ 



cj so 



■O fH 

' d 



• O OS 

: ci d 



■CiSOO 
■ f I O - U5 



O O iC o o 

co »>• ci ci as 



o o 
cj ci 



S 3 



I CJ OS SO 

< -r ~ ci 



o o -co 



ooooo 
so o co co *r 



o o 

CO TP 



2 = * 



-ex 



>sooo ocooo ooooo ooooo 



— ic ■- ico-r • o coo oo o«o«5 • »r o 
-r cc t- rood --^ -^ci ' — ci — ^ cj o • oo d 



MOO 
00 -ji CO 



ooo 

CO ~ ~ 



ooo 

!« u| N 



o^i-g£| o o o o o oo o o oooooo ooooco ooooo 



o — o — o — ■ 



, to oc — — — — 



OOO 
co ci — 



•OcOOtj» — • O C U5 

: „ „ „ o d -ci^ 



■Oicm OBJOOifl 

■ hco ci d — > •-> o 



l-» T OWN -O OO •CM OiOiCOuj OO-^-OO 
oo Ci ifj id co ■ co co ■ — ci ci — 



HHHrtH 1/5 ■ 



cj Noctooo nooon ooooo icoooo 



ooo 
ic ci — 



3 S.2 % 



OOO iCOiOOO 000.00 OU5000 iCOOOO 



CJ OU5U30U5 OOiO-O 



CI eD <© MlOWNN CSC.i 

io -r O ~coo6 
W « f 



OOOOO OClO -o 
NXMOM Ci CO CO ■ i-H 



C O iC 
•— lO 



s ^ 



3 i 
£ d3 £ 



2~ g . 

t o si j- 
k. ra nj S tJ: O 

<CCOO OCUQ 



5jd 



5s Ss c § S 



<u e 03 

.II s 1:2 



ill 

a.s o 



218 



ElCiHTY-ElGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



2 B 

3 2 

MO 



S § :8 



8 :8 



S8 888 



2? £3 



OS OS CO CC OS 
MOUJOCC 
— CO T l~ OS 



r~ CO — 0CO1 
CO — CO T OS (ON'Ttfl 

v_in«iocc oq cc co os co 
co"»r*co"co"co* of— *o"-r" 

««■ CO T <M UO CNU5M- 



CO CM — CM CM — 



00 — CM 
CCC05 

S q s 

CO CO — 



E S-t 

Cw E E 



55 S 



. cu 

O M 
.3 a> 
B — 



C1U5CO 
0COU5M 

oa.t>oo 



CO CO OC UO CO 



a ?> 



CO CM CO 
G — — 

CM CM 00 

uo* o" uo" 



cm »r ci e. c — 

r-. NNioqc 

O CM — t>" OC 00 

CO IQONclM 



O cm -r oo oo 



CO © — 00 o 

— © co os o 



C i o o 
— aouo 
cih"s 



j © CO OS 

t-" -r oc co cc © -r — t 

nON«4 -r — cm oc oc ocr^-co 

(Ot-t-. t~ q ~ <M_ CO CM O0 'T CO 

CM* CM* T* CM* CM* CM* CM* 

CM — 



^ E a>T5'Z* 



o o -co 

o o ■ © o 

cd : o o 

U0 CM CM — 



-r cc — 



188 



OCiOWO 
cc uo — co co 

«tj" CO CO CO CM 



a e « 



CO CO O CO CO 



O O CC CO ' 

r^ - -r — cd cc cocoococd 

CO OS CO CC CC OC CO CC CO T 

KXNOO © — I/O OS -r 



■ CC 0C CO UOOC— OCT 
' tO CC N MtOCNM 
: cc CO CO © CC CC C N to 
ntccsc 



t© CO S 

: oc t«. o. — 



_ - ■ CO 
UO CO 00 00 

cm" -r r~" co" • 



"5 cc CO 

~# cq oq 

'T* CM* U0* 



111 

02 



88 



88888 8888 

© uo uo © © uiccd 
ci <n o t ocoit^uo 



c*r^"— "cm"©" 

CM CM 'T CO -r 



© cc cc © 

Tee" CM* 

' CM — 



888 

CO ©' © 



coo 

O O uo 
OS CC — 
■n- OC CO 



O OJ 

© as. 
ci cd 



uo -r xtcio 
cc -r" >* o" r-* 
co *r co — r- 
uo -r cc -r uo 



(0 r~ c. r~ r~ — — — ■ 



CO *T ( 

os 



SVs. 



CO CO O uo o 
OC CC CC CO O 
CO 00 CO CO OC 
CM — UO U0 
CO — O5_t^C0_ 
0*uo*eo*cM"t^" 
— oc co cc 
co «*• © 



— 00 — O CM 

oi ui cc 
O CO U0 CM 
uo uo O r~ CO 
co*— "-p-yes 

'- = = 23 



© © © © — 



oc co t~ cc ; 



t- OS — OC U0 
Ol — CM_ — CM_ 

uo" co* cc* — * — ' ts^i 



— CO O0 O CM 
UO OS OO CO CO 



O o o O ~r 
© © © © — 

edeidto 
— — as -r os 
•*r cc os, — 
r-"oc"o"cM"o" 
r- t~ c-. uo -r 



;8s88 



OSNCOKC1 

-r cc" cm* o" cc" 
uo cc cc 



888 

Treed 



r- O O 
UO — 00 
CM — 



■as -3 

fHCQfe 



CO U0 CO — T O O 00 O CM ' 

— oo cc co co q cm — oo uo ooi 

— co cd cm t-" N w d d N cc r-" — ' O 
*r o os — os coO'rcoo ocecoo- 
-r cm uo cm t-- oo t-- cm uo — -r co oo o 



O U0 CM CO CM U0 CO UO 



cioioosco uot>-oo 



r>"oo*CM"co"cd 



I ^- ytj I ^» UJ ^T- — -T- (,^4 W W ^-'V «J 

CO* 0COrcM*O"cC* CC* CM* CO* OS O* O* CM* U0* t>* CO* CO* CO* 

CM OC OC CO 00 OS UO OC CO CO CO OS CC 00 — O 00 00 

CO Oil~OtOC XOlNTlO NTlOCOKS OCOOcO 



■is 4) 

o 1 



i ~ 

<8 O 

« Eh 



aj B 
=: b 

<< 



HI 

S3 > p 



£--c 
OOOQ6. 



fc"C Ee e S 3 8 s fic2 



Maryland State Department of Education 



219 



cv 
e 

3 
-> 

C 

C 



09 

* 
B 



1 8*9 



-si 



c 2 c 

22 £3 

S 3-S 



cS C C 

c b c< e* 

Or™ I- C 

3 i 4) .5 

s3> s 



o o 

OC o 

d d 

OC t~ 

04 0\ 
dec* 

O C) 
X o 



oi e 

CI X 



ova 
cc » o 
cn t> to 



oc 

-1"°. 



Ir- O -<J< 05 tJ" r}< -H eo 

teototoeo -i n m>) t- 

cj ce cc x oo x_ eo oo 

co'cMco'deo" ecoTt-dd" 



Tji x C5 as 
—i <7> CM <-i CO 

t-"dd* 



en to m i" oi eo x -r 

_ rH -h — © iO tO t- 

inddx'6 x t- x' 

ifl a « c io lomn 

A ooi> toco t^Hji 

— d-*deo" dt>eo" 



•5- _ E 

IlJf 



eg t> eg c~ eg eo >o i— i eo to t- 1— eo as uo eo oi (CM^ni 1 

X -H OHiflNt- OJ trt lO CO LO O CM IO CM Cv| t>- X rj» 

cd t» cd co '^t d cc tc' HTf'io'w dt^^^t'd noj'xnV 

o <-h iflt-ioiot- io eo x eg t> eo eo eo -< c- en -f eo 

to eo«o«o ho l 00 . 1 ^ 10 . . t^c-^x^<c ®°c u ^*^. 00 . 

d d t-'xdeeTt-* rtoVocw i>eo"'dei'— ' d«f eo't'eo* 

x oo »o cm >c cj eo -i to r- 



o to CJ 

CM to i-i 

dd m 
f oo> 
eMeox 

CO — 



CJ O CM 
CM O M 

to O to 



oooc 
ooo o 

(CNHX 



o • 

UO • 


■ o o 

■ m o 


OOO 
OU50 


! 


:6c 


d eg d 
x t> to 


x . 
o> . 


i-i X 

. i-i CM 


If ■ 




d 



.2 >>2 
a a o 

CSQ-C 
O W 



00 J> O C75 tO UO 

eo laxqooji 

d iflcoHom 

X i-i to C7> t~- 

tO O O CO X C7) 



o> eg cn eg 

Ol>t>«Oi-i 
CTl CJ "»»• Ol 



CO lO »H eg Oi 
tO i-i OS C« CO 



co to eg i-i 
coo — eg i-i 
to cj o t uc 



— co 
to Cft x 
to eg i** 



> o eg ej cr. ci -r — co 



at u ~a 



eg — io t> o eo 

t> it | eo i> o '•f 

d x x d d eg 

0C «ft-Wt>« 

X Ot~tC*f"X 



OS — OX X 

10 ac io eg o 

X HtC^!C 

C- t> t> — U0 

rr to_ uo_ i-i eo 
Tdd^r 
< eo — eo 
s eg — 



cj i— i eo o eg 
Ol 05 o> iO ic 
d d eg' eg 

to »H (O U3 



n< to uoeo O) 

[- CTi uO — CTS 



CO Oil 



a ue to o cgeocgoso 
— cm eg x t — — 
x x ^ eg 



M 5! T3 > o 



=: c es cs ca 
< < OQ CJ w 



l_ o 03 t. 
fllOC £ 

CJCJCjQfc 



4) 



1) O «S • *3 
c« csj O U O 



I is II 



c 

° « I- 

3.2 o 



220 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



* k- <2 
ill 



5-5 £ * g 

SO*.™ J 



3 = - 1 



11 



* £-3 



io io 



"5 .-. -r 



C O OC — i 



cciooii; ri -r c o -r 

o ^ >o ~ iO«i0^1' 

CI f Os OS >-t»Ct-M 

CM* eo cm" ie — * CO 



© © © o © 
o o o © o 
©©'©'©© 
© © © o o 



ff. IO C !D Ol 



CS CO 
MOO 

oo oo irs 



i ~ c: © e o CMn 

HOOOO © I - OS 

ceded ©' — « 

l-CSCC © CO CO 

5 ©„ ©_ o 5 oo S 

co" G> «c" 0> -r" ci r - r- 

fCMOOi eoi-eo 

oc «« — ci cmo 



eo eo co oo cs 
©' os «i ci ci 
»o — ■ i - ci co 



f O0C-I 



CCMKO ee lOO O < 



t>CK5MO oooomo 

~ © ©' co -" r~ co ir: r- «o 

CI CI X M ifl 00 CO «5 — CO 

•«r -r co oc cv i - t- f- co r~ 

© — " -r M3 ic ci oo" us lo 



c ci uo © r~ 

OO 00 c-i ©' fi 
oc oc o_— — < 



CO 



© © ci 



I © CO 

ci co cr. i - ci 

co ph oo 

cm" "S 7 i-T -«* os 

— — cm 

-h CM 



© CO Oa ' 

lO OC — ' • 

O i — © © I 

co mo- 



'ICCO © 

l>- © iq cq — © 

I -" © co ©' iO >o 

-r © co — CO -f 

tC-ltd t»>H 



— © OS © 



*T © © 



© -r 

© co 
© -4 



i © ci © ' 
— -r co co co — ■ 
nqn 

F-I CO* 



•rf cq oj© 
co ^J" oc © 
io t ~ oo 



© O0 00 CO CS 
1/5 OC CO 

oc cm" r-"o" 

OO CI "3 



© CO -r t - 

-r -r cs — 
© eo os "5 
~ — OS — « 

•*r © u5 ~ 



— co — «5<ci 

i CO OO CO © I 



cq 


CO 
s. 


© — 00 — 

us os t-. os os 


T "T © CO CO 

co iq ci oo -<r 


© — CO © •f 
OS CO — © CO 


oictesci 

© t~- oo 


t oo iq 


OJ 

"3 


,465. 


t-" OC I-" 
"9" CO CO «— © 
iq»OCO_OS f 


kti 1/5 wi co © 

— CO CD Cl CO 
CI ©_ co_ eo_ ©_ 


oc r~ co os co 
*0 CO © oo 
© — t- m<z> 


oo t-" *r co co 
oo © co © -r 
•ft co © co 


© OS OS 
CO CO © 

iq ©_ cq_ 


lO 

CO 


i/5 

CO 


c» os*— -"cir-." 
oo tt co r» 

O0 OS CO IM CM 


r ~" 1/5" oo" — " ci" 
co os © »/5 
© r>. co co <M 


— " — " r-' ©" «o" 
1 1- - a n 
CO co >o CO CO 


982, 
342, 
239, 
244, 
479, 


OS «5 t~ 
— © «5 


OS 
CM 




— " cf ci" 




~ • ©" 


CO 


CM'-h* 



»t> © co — 
iO ci -r oc © 

OS c" CO oc © 
00 00 1C OC 00 

os_cj cqco_ 

00 CO* OS* OS*©" 
CO CM f CO T 
© CO CO lO CO 

ci co" co" 



OS — oo © 
iq © co cq 
tei >ft co ~ co 

— CO — IC CO 



© CO CI CO CM 



CO 00 f © OS 

-tr co — -r — 

»o co oo © © 



CO CI 00 — OS 



CO •"J"^" »c oo 
CO t — lO OO CI 

CI oo co »o 



— »- CI 



l — © iO 

I CO © CO 
' OS © CI 

"r-*©*lO" 



»o CO © CO 



10000a 
iq~H<Ocq 

CO* OS* CO* CM* 



— t~ cc >o 

»q cq os 

-" OS 0C irt CO 



© cq t-- as 
©' os r~" »r5 ci 
os oc os ci *r 



t~- os co t> © 
ci © cq *r »— ■ 

eoo>«oiot> 

©"os'co"©*' 



Cl CO OO «5 CO 
OS — CO r- 
CO OS Cl ~T 
CO OS CM «i OS 
COCMCOCI'r 

iC* io as" — " I 



— co co r- 



CM 



© ci co © 

OC*CO*— *O0*CM 
to — CO Cl J-' 



Cl — ' — 

os m <m 
"* ©* © 
co »r oo 
■Tlfl co_ 

cc'r-TcM 
»o Cl 



13 

OH 



OS © CM < 
OO 00 f CO 
CO 1-^ CO 00 ~ 

os*«c r-."^"co" 
lO - X «5 t- 

00 OS CO OS ©__ 

»o©"©" ~ 



l« — OS Cl ci 
«o_ci t- -^co 
co"©"cm"cc*»o" 

t- OC © lO 



oo »c © © 
CO CO CO CO t-. 
-" i^" iO ci -q" 



eo co us co co coioco 
©cqcqiqos ©cq© 
co ci — " os co -1 ec" eo 



oc oc © co — — oc © 
oo co_ eq_ T_ cq^ iq ci ©_ 
— " ^-" — " — " — •" io*eo"c»* 



:::j: ::::i?|^ : ::o : : 

1 1 1 t$Ui Jiiji ^jj l^liJ 111 

I I o |gl?i| N-S-i-j g^g^t lisp |11 
111 ^<mc3o &$6&& oxKtSl "£<§^«gS S'^l 

H cc H 



§*h a 

><.£•§ 

OCj'-^ o 
i-3 °"«2 

III 



Maryland State Department of Education 



| Ml 



111 



lONtOOO OMtOMO OM CI »0 Cl U5 T ?l ?5 CO CI I- 

— CO CO © CM Oi CD OI — © CO CI ■• C lO Ol — O 

ifNOOw^ e-jiOtedtD 00 cd d oi cd M'6dt-?i 

NOftow in-rc-ici- -•rnoi'" 5* 00 Q> 69(0 

OC 00 OO OO CO OlfiOOtD MC-TiOOl © CD_ Oi_ CO — 

ci" 00 co" — " 00* «r — " — co" ©" 00 ©" 10" GO «o" — " «©" m* — " — f 

t CCOl « NN-MN CM © — — — • 



CI O CI 

O co -r 

e» — — 



CO 00 10 



NtDOWO 



OOCit^-O 

ci c to iri « ci 06 00 oo t~ 

M-S WOO iO T CO CO lO cn-T?lco c= r-c — 

c: c: od ci oi coco ci — CO to 115 01 O) c ^ c ^." r . 

co' ad to — <" — 1 iiiiot-.-f' n o'"0"i!»-< -r* t" — " 

ci 1 - — Ci 1 - «* — ■-£ — 00 'O co cc — — OO53 00 

CM — — — CI CM CO — « — t^. lO — — — <H CO CM — 



O 10 (D - N 
© — 10 -r <*i 
dtcd'toi 
»c r ~ x — 



ci m O "O to 
00 Ci CM 00 CO 

-r id cc id 
«r 00 01 cm 

IO NO ~f CO 

r-'os" — "cdi-" 
co to co co — 



<c — ci co -r 

— ci >d — 

— — Ci CO o 
NCIO — I- 

co" t«I co" cT — " 

CM O0 CI — CO 



— r-» co co © 

CO 00 CM CO CO 

cd oc id -r ~r 

— ci m 1^ f- 

01 Oi co CM OS 



iq c; -n 

or in >' 



-T — CM 



— lO 1^ — lO 



t~ — — — CO • 



U5 T 1 CM »f < 



> CM CO — — 
• CO CO T CM 

1 rCo"tC 



CO — C CO o 
01 cm_ 01 ^ co 
— "©"06" 00" id" 



mm-ooo 

Ol — CD CD 
O Oi O0 O Ci 



CO 00 00 O CO 
— CO t->^CM CD 

"— *o"co* 



ci a co 

to — CO 

— do 



■ 00 lO CO O CO to CM CO "1" t — r CO 
— — CM Oi Oi 



© 00 Oi tO CM 
Ntf MO 



Oi © Oi O CO 
oi co 01 oi 06 
CM o 00 CO CO 
NfUSOCO 

co"co*—" co"i^* 

OOINO00 
CO o 00 00 to 



T CO — CO 
CM CO CO OS 

oi cm © d >o 
cm -r 00 to 00 
©_ — 10 -r cm_ 
t~-"-r" iCod co 
OO "* Oi O0 CM 
COCONtfl* 



CO 0B - 
OO < 

id t«" i 



— © CO to *f 
CD — CO O O 

*f cm* 0" co* co 



1 co to co -r co 



-a 



t^-Ciino 
•^r co cm to 00 

CM CD CO CO CO 

00 00 — — 
•»r 00 to 

CM*Oi OOOiOO 



CO Ci CM © — 
CD Oi lO — 

CO to CO CM 5 

O 00 00 cm_ r~ 
t^."o"oscM"— " 

CM CO CM CM rr 



OS lO CO CO 

06 cd d cd i>* 

— CO T> — OS 
CO «o CO co to 
•>i*oo"i--*©*eo"' 

CM lO CM CM — 



IN Oi N N CO 

cd Ci l** cc ci 
o o 01 — 

if to T T O 

-i*o"o"tVr-T 



— ~1 O0 
CM O0 

co — 



• CI I 



r ~ CM Oi CO •f CM 

OS COCIOIOO^ 

CM CM oi "<r CO — 

CM CD CM CO T CO 

CO •^CMlOlOOS 

to to* -f oo't'i>." 



1 T»< tji O0 CO 



. O r-~ co — oor- 
r-~ 00 co <~ 



WOiOM 



•<roooocoiq 
OS to — "os© 
T CO Oi Oi CM 
0_CO OCO OS 
— CM*— Ci 



CO 000 00 Oi 
OO CD — OS 

06 — d co — 

CO 01 — CO O 

r-- -r r-. to 00 
oTodcd* cm*—* 

CO to CO CI CO 

00 1^. 00 00 06 



tO f*- CD 

COMN 

oi d os 

CO tO Oi 

CM CM CO 

r-Too co 
5 "° © 

co" — * — * 



)2.50 



to 

ad 


! CM 


CO 



c? ^ 
PL, < 



© © O 
© © CM 
00 tO td 



© CM 1^ CM Ci 



O td 



gg 

d © 
— co 



5o 



T M N N C! 
© — CO id OS 
© — tO to -f 
00 Cl_ to t - 00_ 
f " CM* CM* CO Oi 
O0 to CM CO CO 
CM 00 to © ^5* 



CONlON 
00 CO 00 — CO 

— © CO CM id 
lO CM CD © lO 
«SCO — CM_C£5 

— CO CO©" CM* 



— Tl> to — Oi 

d ci — id cd 

Oi to © CO 



© I- iO 

Oi 00 

id © ot* 



li r 



© o CM to CI 



r~ co — -f 

Ci CD CD to tO 



C> © lO — < 
r|i © co CM ■ 



© co co 



co r>» co 

CM lO CO 
© IO 



© 01 00 01 to 

CO g Oi — tO 



I^UINCO 

co "Tinoi co_ 

CM*0C*CO tO CO* 



J © tO 

td ~v co oi id 

CM OO t>. Oi t^- 
CO ^ CO OS 00 



© © lO © I 



Nmcrioc! 
cm to cd oc id 
os Oi co iO 
© > 'T -r co — 

00 CM*'^"'©*00 



a © 

tO CM © 

ci d id 



I 11 
Q 



co 

cd © 

CM — 



CI CO tO CO CD 
© Ci Oi 00 © 

id 06 ci id © 
© co © r- to 
oc rr — © to 
"co"io 

[00 Ci 
'j'od'co" 



© Ci ci • 



CM 



lOffNO 

ao — © 00 
cm cd r- - ci 

Cl 00 — © CM 
© Ci CO CM 
©" if to" c" CO 
*»• CO — 00 © 
— if Oi CO 00 
cm" CM - cm" CM* 



01 10 »r Oi ci 

OOOOOCJN 
oi CD — ci oi 
co os co co 
© CO 00 CM 



f 00 CO o: tO 
© CO 00 00 

© © CO 00 to 
lO O0 CO lO CM 



— CM CO — 10 



— co_ to 

cd" oc" © 
ci oc x 
— a: 



— ^J. — 00 CO — ' 



.E-§ 
"2 c 



CO CM CO CO CD 
00 Oi CM 00 

oc" t^T co ad o* 
00 CO — — oc 



— ^ tO CO CM 

ud id © cm id 

101 — " 00 
CO* CO* CO* CM* CO 
"9« CM CO CO OO 

— © CM lO 



r~ co © 10 co 

CD CO CD 00 CO 

d — — cd ci 

CI CO to ^ Oi 

°.°.' r .' r ."~. 

CO* cd* oc* oT CI* 
tO CO CD Ci 



cm to cm cc 

© CM © Ci CO 

id co id d © 
cm -r — oi 



CM OS tO ■ 



CI 



1 to 



© co co 

ON- 
00 © 10 
»r ci_ 06 
Oi* co" co" 

CO CO 

r~ os 



1^ »r — to 
00 Oi CO CO o 
ci oc — -r 
©_^r co os S 
»r"oc*©"cM"r>* 

CO if 00 CM 
CM CM 



Oi CM 00 CO 00 



CO IT OO CM 

tj< co "i" 00 
r>. -T t^ cm ©i_ 
cm" 00" ©" — * id" 



"cr oi — to cm 

CD — — T CM 

10 >* co ©_ — 

■»J* OO* CO*©* CM* 



8 co 00 c-c- 
© OOcDg 



CCXN 
C- f 

cd ci 06 



© 



CM — g 

01 © ci cd d 

OC 00 lO 'T CD 
CD t~- CO 00 — 

01* to i^* -r" cd 
to — oc tO 

00 Ci CO Ci © 

to"©"©" — " 



— oc — tO © 
© r- — — 

CM CM CM OC 1^- 
IO — Oi CM CM 
lO_CM_t^.^CO_ 
CO* ©*CM* CO to 
00 © f to 



— N lO M f 

cd — oi 00 

CD CM if CO lO 

-r* 10 ci cm" co* 



CO CM — OS CO 
tO CD © CM CO 
06 © Oi lO CO 



E- o 

S o 
U B 

l_ — 

C c! 

— X: 
-c 



I 1 

-3 S 



Hi 

filjl ll|"lo 111 

r§i|| inn ciSi 5 ! Hi 

OOOQrS OECSSMS -Cxrr- =.-=-=* 



— "3«s 



222 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



5 2 



- e.£.2 
.8 S ~ 



a 2 



til* 

2 'J 1 2 
'='3 S — 



to 

M 


CM 


CM 
C 


ed 

r - 


CO 


e i 


cr 


to 


CM 


oo" 

s 


Os" 

c<9 


OS 

-r 



o. o~* OC to CO 
-;0>P5«a 
i/S as »r co 



- tc >fl ir, at 

«r os oc co oo 

to cm as ae 



c m k o. - 
© to cm oc to 



MI-iO I - f O. - I- 



M O P5 Oi n 



co r- ci — co — cr. or 

— ic t — t- t rc 

i/° co cm os ui-ri- 

■— oc -r -r co C I - c 

1 1- O Cocu-, 

t — ! vO cm" 



© Ov < 



-r 

to 


s 


• CO 


»/f 

CM 


i 


a-: 


16,7 


5E 
cm" 


cm" 





co g s? 
-r CMtc 



— « COlOtsOJf 

© w 6 -r 
«5 coccret 



cm" — "co 



'■5 
e 



SCO CO o c 
icnoq 

-r cm os © 
eo oo cm — • — 



as cm io co 
ae co r>* cm ui 

O N - OS N 



gg2g?2 § 



g£g 



gg! 



£8 



13 S | 



<Cr»NC«0> O -f CO I 



eo — co oo 
> as co as ■ 
■ 5 — -r ' 



— O OO CM 
T CO CO OS CM 



ae r~ r~ ac — 
oo to co us >* 
CO «r to — 
a-, incu^f 

US «fl CO C73 CM 

co" n$ -r" cm" pi 



O0 CM CM C I 

© oo — vi < 

t"» CM t-» t" < 

m us cm ©_ • 
to* cm" cm ■ 



co uo r- 

o © to 
cm 35 to 



i - -i 

co O to co O 

CO TCM-O 
l>. CO CO OC CO OC 



S? CM 
CO CM OS < 



3 

„ Joi 
to — ao to co 
—.to — _*r 
ov ai" co" oc" cm" 



CM CT. CD 5 S 

r- -r -r o o 

XCItfO 
C O f CM CM 



os O 

1/5 — 00 

co* cm" *q 



3 
a 2 



n 

Mm 

lif 



•gjl 

Hi 
SB 



O — t» — 



OS «« 

cm © 



© OS 
ONCO 
© OS CM 



os a 

CM S 
OS OS 



■ © 

■ CO 


~- . . 

oo ■ - 


: S§8 


:© 

. to 


os 

OS . . 


: SS'S 


• °l 


© . . 


r» o> ud 




CM 


to" -rr -r 

CM 



— g CM g 8 

i^uixod 

© CM OS 1*5 © 
TTNCCriC 



sggse-g 

gggSog 



:2ggs 

> CM © © OS 
» CO OS © CM 
I co co co «r 



;gggg 



© CM © tO © 

© OS© OS© 

© OS © OS © 
© a; © OS CM 

qaqoa 

©"©"cM"cc"t>" 



I OS © 

'ggs 



g gsggg 



•O © © CM < 



© CO © S g 

OS OC g g © 
CO iC us ©_ 
©" oc" CO*t>.* Os" 



©cc© 
©' © © 



ggggg SSSSS ggggSs ggggg gg§ 



gggg 



« t>. <N CO 



gggg:^ 

CO lO © CO © 



ggsgg 

© CO © t» CO 



gig 

CO iC CO 



T CO CM »0 OC 
CM CO CO CO CO 

x x r- — 

"T O0 IC "^O, 

cm"©"oc"©"oc 

CO "5 — — 



CO : 



I CM © i 



CO OS US ' _ 

*• oi co 
I co cm *r 

) 00 CM 
t>."c"©CM"— " 
CM CO CM CM T 



CC C N cc cs 
>r*© © r~ 



5t 



S? S -B > P f-~ u"5 fc t: ft e c eX«^c-o IX" 
s§"c;-c3 cl c-SJcfe SSoJo -l^^g^ 8.2o 
«»OC CCOCfc CEXttS CCKXr- 



•a-o 



be 

e s « 



: f.§l 

J= -iii 



Maryland State Department of Education 223 



M a - U5 fl 

tei cm 06 © 



8.B 
a. o 



»» 1 _ 

a 8 " 



— o — cc — • 



r~ -r »~ c. -r 
oc os oi i" *r 
-r -r -r — co 

T O! C Ol 1^ 

©" cm" cm" — i 03 



— co — 1 



— ac — • -r co 
»r © © r~ cm 
C C ^ C -r 
(CCTCCC 

ic ?i M c-i 
to oc" co" eo 00 



OS — CM — 
■ CO CM — 00 

i © ci oi 



O ) C X — 
oc ac cc -r -r 
•r c C - oi 



-r C © -r • _ 
■ Cl M «5 M 



fMt- 

© CM CT. 

~ cr. ai 
— 1 - -r 
-r »c CM 
ra -r 



cr. -r ci 
© co co 
«5w' 



«S be es 

!!<! 



CC(C0CP5O 

— 10 cc -r 

co os os cc co 

OCCNt^ 
— CM 10 — •— 



"TU3NCIC 

o a n m « 
caitcioai 
f o o — co 

tD <M I- f OO 



f C-M- 



— OS 
CM »C — 
CO — * 



Etc: 3 



r> c C C 1 



e o © ro o 
© © o co o 



O © o o 

© es © © © 
c 5 c >c >o 
Nooa cm 
-r to os t-~ 00 



r~ © cm © © 



OC CO 

os tei oc 



O CO 00 00 o 



CO 01 CO ■ 

cc tei oc* ■ 
55 1 



cm «o cc «o -r 

r-' ~ OS OS C3 

cs cmc- 



-r 00 co © — 
f ewos 
co irj cm 



r - ^ 



CD r> 



S o 



t-» i-j i© 

n ui (C cs n 

— — OC CO 



•<* cm" cc" © rC 

CI M C4 - - 



— < CM Ol CO 

os *— « co os 06 

«f5 ~<M CM CO 
COMCP) 



CO CO CO — CO 

r~ © os c© co 
cc oi cm os -r 
— ifl -r iq — 1 
cc t~-T »f5 10 co" 

CO cc — — 



--MS10 
oc' cc — ' oc t- - 



OS CO CO OS — 
iO CM t--. o: CO 
— O CO CO CO 



-XC) 

OC C. CO 

cc cc -r 



1 p.2"d J3 



5 


K3 


CO © OS © CO 
OOOOOOh. 


CO 



CO 
^< 
<o 


~ o4 -r ui co 

Ol Ol M <C h. 
OC 00 CO 1/5 




OP 


cm* 00 os cm* cm* 

CM CC CO 



ncoc< 
co co © < 
m to oc n ^ 



© e © «* cm 

dtONcd 
cm os ^ cm co 

CM* CO* CO*--" CO* 

— < m 



— — 

O C CO 



NC» 
IO OC CO 

— t 



~. o — ■ 



inociNto 

oi — < — • KS CO 

r- cj « cm cc 



1 cq <£> f us 
fco I"- 



co O to cc — 
MOOlCOJ 
O CT2 CO — ' 
O Hi O V -T< 
-r" 00*0' cc" co* 
r- - C f T N 
CO *C CO 

— r — •' cc 



■o — 00 1 . 

cc 10 — — . 

ocrr 



coco 
^: oc tei 

a> 00 o 

MOO) 
oc O co 
CO w CO 



— > o O a> 



»r ciciocm 



: C2 -r cm r^. f ( 



co o o cc co 
co ic — -r 
aoiooo 



co co o o o 

N U5 C C 



. Oi -r — — — • • 



ceci-r 
oc t 
cid- 

10 1^ CO 

c — — ■ 

CO* — * — " 



o >o -r o 

qoo<fqo 
cj cc cd cd 



00 co cc ~ to 
— <*t>"cc*co"o" 



O O O OS (M 
= C= f •!• 

O co os oc os 



MCISCC 

■ * rc dd d 
aocNCS 
— — OS 00 o 
oc -r" co" tei -r" 
01 — • — — — 



a. f C ifl » »rt (M -r tei -r -r co — co WOCON 
MONON OS O C! c m Ojr-CCCOOS XNCXC 



O 3 C 



OS O OS 
OS CO OS OS 0O 
CM CC 00 CC CO 
Nf lflO CO 

<o*co"— "co*r>T 

COiNCM 

co O oc oc tei 



CM CO CO OS 

<m cd © tei 

TXlflX 



CD -'~.* ,T '. .' = i. 

Vc*o" CO* CO* 
OS (M CM OS OS 
iOU5lfl«5K5 



'4K 



~ = -. -. -r. 
<<CQGC 



5 c^ii 3 £ 



.1 RSl^ 



cic-c 

I -. - ~ 

cc ic -r a-. 

OS CC CM 



— tet cc — 
co os © os 
cs r~ cd 

oc cm -r cs 
t - r - — 
tei tei © cs" 

— OC CM 



C 5 g 
S • tr - = 
•IS c-f 



224 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



I J 

^ o Si 



co co — ao -T 
oi otf oi cc cd 
a c co -r i- 



to 


• § • !o 


• • r>- 

• • o 


s 


ig is 

,35 . cr. 


:*»* 
. .«*> 

. . cm 


o 

CM 







!L1 

o o a. 

•a 'I 



© cq 
o"o" co 
co r- — 



oc r~ -r «r 

cm cm cc tq 

t-" CO CR 
-t« CO © CM 

•r u; t 
o" co to" O 



OJC-lC-l 
CO CO CM — * — © 

r- -r cd Co6m 

CO — O CC o -V 
CC OO to OO to CO 
to" CO C* I* — * 00 



CO -fOfl 



O OO CO tO C-l CO 00 
CR CR 
' C-i — to CO CO) 
' C-l CO >0 to CC — 

> 00 cm cc co »r -r 



to CM cr. cr. ■ 



00 OOlflNCS CO 

to o Old - to 00 

cm -r 
r— 

to cq co t— to 

01 fC V 
— — CO 



eft f cr. -r 
to co co r- r- 

Cft CO 



o Q © ~r oo cm < 
to © — t co oo ' 
cio ~ cc to o 



•J :co 

en . t-» 

— . CO 



CM r-J CM CM ©> — 

CO CM CM © 00 00 

tO lO O CO — • a6 

CM CC 00 -ifllO 

CM_0>'J< CM © CM_ 

r-* t>T oc co" cm" 



O GO CM 00 
*V — © CO 
— CO CM t^l 



©cd .c 

SCO . ! 
CM . < 



Oi CC 00 O CM CO o-«oo>"5 

tO CM CO tO CM to T CO 00 CC 

tO CC? CO CM 1^ CM l5o6t^"9>eM CM 1> OS CO 

co to cc *r r~ co r»«fCiO to oc cr. co O 

OOOqtqcq — — j.&'reMaq oq— oq-«roq 

»r cr" r^." r-* r-." © ©" od — -r" 

— C O -f 



— Cm CM — O 



— oc cc o> © cm «© o> -» cccmco 

— icr-to o cm oc co oc — en 
»r — O to co oid$ 

cm to — to «rtOO 

—■ _ cm_ cr iO_ cRcdtq 

CO CO O to CO CC CR C7. 

CM — CO — — — CM 



CO — 



5 a 2 



p toco 

c5 — to f 
CCO-rci 
to 00 ~ 00 CR 
© co eqtq — 
cc t" to" to" r-" 

tO — CO —CO 
— CM CO 



3-5 So 



tOOtoco co — cm co -r — r» co co O ao -r cc 

cncMooco — oc to to r~ cooccmcoco to cm -r 

-r to O co to — c-i to — o ccocto-r-r -rocc 

*r ao cm — • — cr. cc O — cm to r~ t>- cctooc 

to cm o -r co n m c - t- a oi co n oi eoecc 



co to co co ■ 



CO N CD c. 



' CM to CO CO 



1 | 

1 * 



— «o «o 



CNlOlOCl 

to cc r-. ir — 

cm eft to cc ac5 

CO CO 00 CO 
— 00* CO* 



Ot^tOCOCO OCOCTN 

(Nffi't qin o — o to co 

CO — to CO to o — cri o — 

© t^ © © CM CR — CO CM 

00-rCC_aq©_ O_COC30 

— *— "co" oo" — *o" 



ad cd — 



cm r^. © © 
C co cc co 
— ai to cm cc> 
co © ao to O 
I- cc -r -r ac 
— " cm" co" r~ — " 
o^to — cm 



© CC "T CO CO 

tO CO — to t^. 
*r cd *r ad c© 

Oi 00 CO *f CM 
CO — CO CC CO 

o*cc"oo"r>"— " 

to to to T CO 



— CM — CC — CO 00 OS tO 

O to to to cm co co — r~ 

tocor-Cocci oiceScoo' 

lONOifO O cc cr. o; os 

O^^rtO'TOo ccac*rr^- 

CM"r>rco"o"o" cn-'o""* 

CN X CC M CI O C-l CO C-l 



§2! 

C3 tO *V • 



i CM CO 00 
1 03 CO 

i cc o c> 



— — o> cm 

COCSCCO) 
tO CM OS tO 



. cm to ao r- crn c 



— to to e-i cd'rcocscM 

CMCCn-tOO-. CO00 0OCOCO 

ioto_— oeoo e-i cm to oo 

Tco"co"o" cjwooiow 



CO CO S 
to o5 cr' 



CM 



CM CR CI p C-l 
— — CM O CR 
CO OO C* O CO 
tj< CO to O CO 
!--.<» — 00 CR 

c"i--"cm"c:"c" 

CO CR — — 



I rj- 0C 00 
! CO 00 -V 



CM CC CR O — 



crcc-c r~ oo — — o — cm t- 

CMCCtOCC— tO-^CRC-l-Ti — COO 

e-iotit^octd — ci oo — -r id o — 

cr — to — r» cr. cm x t~~ t— n^n 

OXNCC-^ C-l tO COCC Oi — CO — 

»r" cm" t-^ to" cr cr" — " o cc" oo* co" CC cc" 

CO CC C-l C-l — CC C-l CO — C-l — CO CI 



O C 

O 



— C 00 CC CR 

— tor-. — tq 

CM ^ t-- CR CR 
OO C-l CO — — 

t^co_co_'r cm_ 
co* cr" r—" c* " 
oc cc oo t ^ 



CR CR CO — CO 

cd c-i cd 'S" 
CO — C CO o 
caooNeo 
— "o'ecodto* 

— CM — 00 tO 



CO — CO CO CR tq — CO 

c-i cd — — ci — cd CD 

CXXCCD COON 
— CC CM CO CR — 

cc*-c*cd 
co r- i - 



CC — CR CO 




Maryland State Department of Education 



226 



<* q 

d r-' 

c. co 

O co 



.jig 

K*=~ 



x co co ^ x 

®. p i H . p i l *. 

t-" lc *>* t-"?r 



eo eg — oj 

X Ci m "C N 



N U2 in (O 

m m m co x 



t~ t- co 

4>lHO 



ci co oj oj CO l- c <r. 



m 
III 



x m x m 
Kcm'xx oo»o7< 



■ C Ol t> 

' — CO C5 



os in x eg t- 
— 1 c-j cc tt t~ 
m co x — < eg 



OCiO 

eg' t' 

CMC 
^PC4 i-J 

eg'cg'co* 



illll 



ROOi^C 

q q eg in 
t~" —< cd to eg 

tooieo r-Tcg 

CO 



KOCMrt 

c- — co eg o 
x «a 05 eg eg 



eg eg co 
■<*< — •*}• CO t> 
»-i co t- m 



co m eg o-j ^ 
c co co o 
x —1 t m 



C X CO 
O CO IO 
IC (0 CO 



c 


CO 

I- 


t- 
co 


*1S!SCC 
C^fflCC 


m —1 co 
c c c c. cc 


eg eg c co 

(ONCOO 


C.rtCCC 

10 t> c c q 


— 1~ co 

OCX 


t> 

CO 

t- 


,604 


eg 

CO 


y- <' C C 
OM-CC 

c ci co co m 


co' d d co co' 
co m co tj< 
m c~ »- m eg 


t-' co' c" d x' 

MNC.Ct- 

co c. co co c; 


co' d d d 
oj co c c 
t> m co ce m 


id 03 t-' 
eg in 
eg ci co 


u5 

CO 




d 
co 






eg* 



















C- X OS CO ~ 

q q co — ; c 
eg' r dec 

C t> c 
C0t-TX« 



— ' — C 



CCC.CN 
■X" CO ceo 
eg c co" d co 
co c ot c eg 

A CO IO "* X_ 

x"in 00 10 co" 



coiccn 
Of cooi 

^oo 10 10*10* 



mcooc 

CSCOfC 

oidew d 
OS c c co co 

b-iotd co"co* 



c c c 
q q © 
d d d 
ceo 
oj co 
t- d^s* 



eg 


10 
q 


N-COXM 

KHCCHH 


eo 00 10 os 
-qqc 00 


co — m 
eg c q t> 


C!CMNt> 

x q q q 


cd 
m 


eg 
00 


x c ei d ■«?' 

X h C K M 

m eg q-v eg 


id 1.0 — cd co 
co co c co 
xqcCH 


~h oi m' co' d 

_ t> CO t~ 
C~ t> TT — X 


d co' d cd 
co eg c co 
oj q egqq 


in 

X 


5,060, 


ccVrt^" 
x co ~ co co 
cgeoc-r-i — 


0*00*-* t> x* 
t> m t- co eg 
r-i^- — — eg 


cg~dTjT-"c 
eg co c c 
eg eg — 1 — -«r 


oj* x* x" t-* x" 
CO — < rr c. 



0a io co 
cdt>i-l 
w 10 — 



ca c; ir 

O 



X 



C3 
t- 


X 

w 


r. 


cc 
co 


t> 

X 


00 
IC 


;,082 


,405, 


,676, 


X 




co 



co t> m oj t« 
m eg co co 
c co m oj c 
rH dcg*T-*d 
eg co c in in 

"f C75 — — 



MCC5W- 
MHOX50 

cn c; x eg ci 



eg x x x c~ 
UO rr x ce 10 

so co eg t-H 00 
in*m"t~*-x*co* 

-*^CO— iX 

eg co — 1> 



m a co co c 
eg tj- ~j co 
co m c. cn 



=3 C r3 cS 

<<cauu 



10 g 

:CCs. 



E 
c 

eJ o S j *f 

S * o S o 



8gJ- • 

iRil 



■ggg 

CS.X o 



e.E 

«- - 

cv t 

. 3 B 
■ t 

c ■ c 

D >*" 

■So" 5 . 



— 1 = 

— — — 



226 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



9) 
3 
3 

3 

c 

J3 
0) 
>- 



o 
o 
J= 

ti 

fl 

3 

Ph 

-a 
c 



3 

P 

St 
3 

3 

'3 
•3 



§ S3 



5 V a 



T3 O 

ill 



OJlOW 



.... 
cm .... 


: :8 3 : : 


WW ;s ; 


27,647 


co b ; , 

CO . . . . 




e* 


MS ■ 



88 



88S 

06 tO CO 

c- o 



000 



88 

d d 



88S 

ad mS mo 
000 



<* © o o o 
00000 



o — > r~ cm 



3.S 



3 S 

2 '3 

3 c 

fig ! c 



3 



58 



CO 



00 O 



ojl rt 



HI 

§ as o 



882 

e co Q 



CO o o o 

0000 
co co t~ d 



88 

>o MS 



o o o o ~r 

© © O O OB 

d o d r- 00 

O CM O OS ~ 

r~ — cm cm — 



cm o 

— 00 
CM CI 



888 

m5 -r »rf 



r~ co co cm — « acixof 



CO O CO CO CO 



"*r a> Oi M5 CO CO"0»Or~CO CC CC O ' 



lOff.N« CO OrtOMO 

w 01 10 o a. 

co'co'coo"^" — "«oc>o*'r 



CC CM — r— r~- 



C5C10-IN CC T 

c c -M - co cc O 

CIC.^lUJCl M5 O) CO 

co co »o"t>."t^r t-T o" 



>. o • 

[s. OS • 
•£> CO I 



CO — T . 



mpiooN n o x m 

T — ■ (M MS CO O fH CO O CO 

r~ r-cdd o m; cm 

MS— — COCO OCMMSCTftCO 

t^CO>-^CCCO CO CD t^t^- MS_ 

— « CO'ms" ~ CM — <~ CM* 



CO CO « ms 



CO O O CO CO CO < 



CM 1 



010-rCMco co cm r^. 



CM CO CO — < 



CO CO O MS 

co Mi co d 06 co co 02 co coMocdr^cM cm d cm 

lO T M O N «tMO-H — CC O CM CO O CO T 

OS *r uo_ o_ co co_ cc-r "!Oi cxqo ex. 

ac"' d ms co mo" r-'ioui— "— " r - co" r^" 

CM O »- >-i — 1 CO CM 



I sill g-s-Sl-i s-ggs! i|s|j 

<:<;pqoo oooQfc owwwS CcycQcoH 



•J £ I 

18 6 



-2.S 



a a 



CM MS 

r - 05 

CO -CP 



Maryland State Department of Education 



227 



o 



in OO-^^CO 

q q q q t-< oc 

co' m' d d d t" 

X CM m CM CO CD 

O *NMHt- 

■>*" OHin'ax" 

eo cm c- co 

OS CM 



O CD OC O CD O -<f 00 CM it 

Ot>HON OCOHt^H 

inoiind co m d in m' in 

c-ocooco t-i-ioooo 

W .1°l rH . t ". « 0_CD_O^CD^ 

-<f CO*Tl*t-"m* CC*"<t"l--*CM*t--* 

CM CI -HHH00 



CO O CO OC CO OO 

o co co ih oo q in 

co co co cm cm" d d 

ooomooo coco 

CMCMCO^i-HrH q_-* 

m" oo'-f't-T t-* co* d" 

O HHH SON 



(M 


•mcC^O 

•H^lOlO 


■ H" CO 

■ 00 ID 


■ t> 


•CMO00CM 
• CM in t> CO 


05H01WO 

q oo eg oo i-H 


• t- 

• CM 


d 
o 
o 


' cm t> co' 
;oeomi-i 

. CM « H t> 


:oo'eo' 

.CO 

• 


!°o 

\ oj 


' t> r-J w' oi 
. m co co t~ 


o eo o eo eo 
en — > cm -* o 
oc o>oo_in o 


;o6 
. t> 

.o 


1,774, 


• x«h of 

• CD CM CO 

<* 


• dd 

ID 


■ co* 

■ co 


•CM*dco*d 

CONOJH 

eo 


w*t>*dcM o 
i-i ■«* cc eo cm 


• o* 



o m m o o 
m cm c- o q 
cm' 1-5 eo d wi 
t> i-i o co t> 



omomin 
q t>- in cm t> 

d oc t> oc 
o cm co ~h 
q_co oo eo 
oc*CM*oo*o*eo* 
-ieO' ••- 



© t- co t- eg 
m o o cm oo 
cmo^** co^oc 

CM O CM i—i CM 



t}< m 
oo 
o> co 



CM cm m 
o oc t- 
eo_oo co^ 

CO*t-*CM* 

m c-i 



o o o ooooo 

ooo ooooo 

odd <6d<6<6<6 

OOO OOOTfO 

o o q oo^o-* o_ 

't~-*i-Tm* oooVoo" 

m cd ocorfiow 



ooooo 
qqcMOin 
ddeo'din 

OOHCCO 

q_in co^qin 
in in cm* ooo" 

t-HTflOH 

CM O 



OO 

oo 
OO 
t-*CM* 



o o ooo 

qq oqq 

do odd 

o o ooo 

m o^ ©.qo^ 

m* cM*m*m" 

co oooco 



o« t 
HQ* 



in OiOi-iCM 



O O CO Oi I 
COifOSHl 

co coo— i 



5 00 
- CO o 

; m" co* 
m> co 



o co eo o o 
qeoHOin 
in Tf'cooiio 
cm oo t> o o 
q-<r co^qoo 
co*'** m* cm* m* 

OCBhO'* 
CM* 



in o cm eo co 
t> m co m o> 
cm in eo" oc in 
a> o t> eo m 
°."'.*'. M .1 

00*CM*'S , *0*CO* 

m t~ m m o 
t- —I 



ooo 
m cm q 

cm' d in 
m co t> 



33 E- 1 



*2 



o . 
ci.,s 

£ 5>"3 

3 > 9 



JBj-S 
ca jjx o £ 



0) O cfl _ 

J c c 
!S O <D O 



a; c * 2 *i 



-8 2 

£££ 



228 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



d 

c 

s 



A 

,0 
c 

o 

I* 



5 5 



"gfl! 

o o 
HO 



ov h-qoo 
cm io ic oi 
«r o co -r 



MS 
C. 


■ a 


• CO 

• CM 


co -r co co r- 


co i- cm 


CO 
55 


:o 
• °i 


; o» 

. >o 


CO OS O CO 00 

r~ oo — i 

CM CO OS —t T" 


cm 1/5 r~ 

»/5 OS -"J« 




• t>r 




«rsoo*rCco"o 

CM »C O 
CO 





OO CO C<> O CO oo 

CO CM f O CO o 

»— « »-H CO OS CO oo 

CO »-l lO OS — CO 

~r »--. r~ cm "5 oo 

o" »o" <rf as -*r »o 

iO CO OO CO CO 



O CO o —> 

Ol O IH 

CM O CO 

CM 00 Of 

cm -r o "5 

co"o" uid 



I CO 



oooooo 

o t-- COO o 



i cm < 



os -«r co" o oo 

OS CM »— ' »— « 

ioooo 
co"t^~ 



lO lO CM O0 OO lO OS 



iriirii'io'o 

CM O0 00 1/5 OS 
CO to if! 1 ~ lO 
CO CM* CO CO "5 

Nation 



co co co -r o 
— c f >- oo cri 

CO CO f CM f 



CO O "T 
CDOl'x" 

cioco 
C CO I — 



!8£ 



CO 00 o 
t>. «q O 
«5 co d 



r-- oo oo 

l>» 0_05 
CM* •-" — " 



CM < 



— o i-~ 
»/5 if" i* »/5 io 

KlOlO CO00O'0<- 



t-- IT) — 



Oi — — o o 
as ~ ' 
OCM_ 
•tr" O" CM O* O0 
O — CO — 
OS CO T 

co~os" 



as f — i co us 
oi ui co oo 



«q <c_ os_ i*. —i 

CO OS O0 CO CM 



2 O ' 
o a i» ci m 

CM — >C 



CO OO »/5 O 

ff »c co a> 

co ^ os co 



O co -r cm co — t oo 



•2o3 



2*9 
-a cr 



• S3 c 



5 s"2 

O — 



•o • 

oo ■ 


• CM 

• CO 


OS 
OS 




! co 


d 


«5 : 


. o 

. «5 




o* ■ 


•o* 


CO* 



f O O oo -r oo OOI— 

OS OS t>- 00 0O i/5 OCO-i 

oi iH tii oo ph uidd 

oo co r>- co rH co co r— oo 

00 qON»fO CMt^lO 

vi Vo'tooo" 



— os 

d co 

CO O 



I CM 



t N ' 



O 



^OlOUJOO «5 

qiotoi; co 

NCU5NO 

?1 — ~ C~. OO CM 



CO -T — ~ . 

oo cq io oc cc 

ifj N 6 ci 

f~ OS CO o — 

tt t~ or — 00 



O iO 

O CO 

d co 



U5 U5 CM 

f CM CM CM " 

t^tOOlNCO 



OOIN 

q-«o 
»0 co c i 



CO ICS CO CO O 



CO t^. O0 00 CO CO 
IC 0C CO oo 



OS 1~ CO 

co co — 
co_t~- o__ 
>C os" co" 



-3 iS 



'DO 



^ f f CO OS o 

co co oooocq_tv-_eo 

«5 »-T o"»o"co*oo"cm" 

o — f f — — 



— CO f— OS 

d ~ CO «5 ci 
oo cm iq_t^oc 
-r of <m" co" a-' 

00 "5 CM CO CO 



O O r~ io r~ 



CO O if oc o 
00 CO 00 <— i CO — tlO^Ol 

— ococmio ooi^i/ico 

U5 0JCCOU5 CSf»OOCO 

cq_cq— _(M_eq_ oouq— Ooo 
—" co" co o* cm osooedcM-f 



CO CO 



s - w 



cu - 
S3 C 



'•S > o £r= «g g-S 
"3 "3 ea c3 fc^ o £ 
CCUO OCCQfa- 



Er co 

c C CO 

iiMi 11513 



Maryland State Department of Education 



229 



"G 
= 

u 

od 



■3 I 



O CS g 

K m O 

— o OS 

CL, 



r— io — tp co cm co i 
o tp co cm -r — i io I 

00 O fOlN^l 



ID <C 39 W -p 
~ o os f> cd 

CD — ■ iO iO CO 



t~ CO O CO co 

t- oi © co oo 

o<5 © © — © 

•r ci - s 

CO OO tO CM CO 

— r -* co" co" — " 



— © o» «r ~ 

O OS © OO I 
^ ci — tc io 

ci oi e ® 5> 
cm -r oi_ © av 

CO cm" CO* pJ 



r- co oo 
ccr»>o 
oqco 0_ 
r - co" co" 



o-owo 

CM o> r>. CM O 
CO CO CO o 



coior — r o 

t-- t-. CO CM lO 

os id co © ui 



2£ X! — 



COCO lO TP lO CO CM 



lO OJ CO CO IO © oo 

o co oo^i-qifl 

as © os "p »— • r — os 

00 r— O CO OS — — I 



•O O. © 

— as © 

— ^ CM CM 



t- CO CM 



2 £ 



ocioceoco 

00 CM CM © CO 



CO lO O © — 

<qooiO)N 
CO O id r>" id 
CO O0 © •— ' © 
co" t~ ad cm" id 



co co os co — 

> co cs 

! id -p 



iO CO < 

ai cm I 



no — co ac io 

oo cd id co co 
— oo co co co 



io ov oi 

tDOlt-. 

co co © 
3 >o 3-. 



93 
re 


OO 


MNtOOliO 
CO OS IO CM iO 


© 




— ^ CO CO CD CO 


■O 


09 

r—_ 


co -r co co io 

mtDlONOS 

idco'-H-^r-r 


oi 


id 

CM 

-r 


.-< CO -i 



1000-00 

o co co co -r 
lor^Noscs 

OS CO — CO lO 

CM OS CM CO OS 



oo co oi os -r 

cd os oo cc os 
co oo co os 
os*i-_ -r o> 
cd cd -r" cm" — •" 



os co co oi os 



I- OS oo 
00 pH 2 
CO CO 



O CO O OO CO 
CM tp CM CM © 
CM — ■ O CO CO 
CM -h O CM 
iO CM CO O 
O* CM* OS* CM* 
~ > © tp 
'■OO 



O © tp cm co cor»cor~io 



ICMOOOCCO © OI CO CD OI 
.■*^"COO0 t- CO © iO 
i CO OO CO O OS OS CO CM 
•Ocmcoco — »p oi co -r 
■ r- © co © io — ■ os cm oo 
©"©"r-"t-."©" 
oo r- © co © 

CO r~ CO —> TP 



00 00 CO OS CO 
— — CO IO IO 

© CO CM CO l*— 
© CO iO — OI 
OS — " Oo"o6"cM* 

© os oo © 



oo CO_CM 
N to" ©" 
io co oi 



co © -r © © 

OS © CM © © 



© co co © as 
iO r- os © i 1 
cd id os © oo 



CM 00 © © © 
t^- CM © © © 

cd cm id ©' © 



or-ooo co co r — r© 

~ iO CO CO OSCOiO«OtO 



ss© s§§ 



©r^t~-o© ©CO©©© ©CMOO© CM© 

or>-cqo© ©iq©©iq © co © © co © 

id tp cd © © © cd © © tp oi"©©--' t- - o © © o id © «j< 

© oi o © ©oi©©co ©©©©co oo©©©© — ©co 

© © © tp oq r~ cm tp co oq coeoiot^t" t^osci^C) OJ cm co 

©" —* : r -" >d to" — ' © id id tp ©" tp id id" ©" — <" id id »o" >o" — " — " tp" 

COOliO — — —t — — ©b~ CO « 



S 2 



' © CO CM CO 



»-l iO Tf f CO 

CM CO CO CM 
OO OS CO CO OO 
CO CO CM O0 ''T 

Tt<"o6"t-rTj<'^' 

1 00 OS © 



CM_^ ©_(-._ OS 

cm" r~" r^-" — " co" 

© CM CM OO 



© CO OS 1^ CM 

© io -T co 

oo cd id r^* cd 
co t~~ co 



CO iO OI CM t^- 00 CO «— ' < 



co io >o os 
co © co co co 
oi -r t ~ "T" cm 
— ."id'^ , "r}'"cM" 
CO 00 — —i CM 



iO CM *—* CM © 

© r-- « oc 
© oi cd « cd 

CO CM CO ~ — 
©_t~ OS CO_©_ 
•rf t-Z -T tt CO 
iO "5 CO CO oc 



iO OC © CD O0 

^inqqt-. 
oi t>" cd cd i" 

00 © © OS 

os io oq *r oo 
co" t^- ©* cm" cm" 

CO OS CO CM CM 



co cd co • — ■ r ^ 
iq io os iq *-> 
oi — iz ' — — • 
'r co t co 
as iom ©_o> 
r-" io" o* «o" i"" 
to — — CM 



0"T01 
— © OO 

io as © 



iO CO CO © -3< 
CM OO CO CO ^ 
t-* CO — OS o 

cc -r «on 
cq_© io_c» cm_ 
t»"as"cD"' 



io © oi co © 



-INCJCO-l" 

«-« cd id os 

co co co 



i —i CM CO ~* 

I^ttioin 

> O CO © 

' -h ~r os co 



t- — . — CM — < 

i CO 



1" CO OS CD 

cd -p ©' id cd 

CO CM © CD © 



t- © OO © iO 



OS ^P CD O0_< 
CM* •—" ©" ' 



© os. as iq 
t>* ~* id oi co 

CO •— • CM CO *J< 

•»P_co_r>^cq_o> 
— i *oo" ©"oir>r 
tp co t co 



OO iO co_ 
odee'r-"' 
tp as io 



3ii 



00 


lO 

CM 


— iO — CO © 

cq as cq as 


CO 




as as © id id 


00 
CM 


© 

CD 


© — CM OS 
iO iOtPCO© 


,947 


OO* 
CO 


d^oiVd 

•O CM CO © iO 

io_-^cq_»-< co 


OS 


od 

CM 


— " OI* lO* 



• © CO © OI CO > 



i OO iO 



' CM CM t>- 00 lO 00 



< 00 CO IO CM lO © CO r-~ COO' 

dd««i> •-" © oo cd r~" •-" o> — • id ~i idascd 

© — OJ CO CO CMCDTPCOOO ©t~iO 

MOO ^N c - >«'-^oqoo_ OI CO — © CM © 

00 iO* id ©" CM* CO id*-- CM CN CM TP Tp CM 00 CO" CM" tp" 

© oo — < r- t^coTpio© -.cvso coioro 

t-- CO CO TP OS iO — TP CM © CM CM CO CM OJ lO CO CO 



2?i 2 
2 

rs c cs cs co 



OCJOQCs. 



U O 51 _, W 



"as C a, 
£C*MMC- 



3 5 



2.3 



.is 

i3 aj 
.53 « 

"§•1 

S 3 
-a -a 

=3 3 



230 



Ekjiity-Eighth Annual Report 



-r cm m to ' 
d — " -r cm" i 



Dl-fOlh. oor-u.iot- 

d d r~ ^ d r- © c-i .-^ d 

f - M f O I COICCM 

o> oo do 10 -* m ci ~r ©_ o 

©doc cm us i-'i-'m'-fc; 



C. CIC IN M — — © 

icto«5Qf5or5 r-° d d 



.2 2 

3M 



m in o o o r~ a 

O 1< OI--M-TO 

d d d d © 

-r >0 OO M M IO m 



m o <o t>! e -r to to oo in 

piomoif looococoo 

U5 0COIMI- ©I- — — O 

-iflowq ooO'rqoq tecqco-ri~ 
n'm' —<"oo" .— <* ~ |C ~- — * cm c 



oo«oo § ^t? ^ 
-r o iO *r »0 d r-* d 
cxcitt. co co . 



lO U5 TO l» 

d d d d cm 
co co ~ cm cm PINO 

COU5C1NI" 

-r co — 



cm q co — — 
i-coacd<o 

NN01>CC 
CO CO CO — O 
CO* d" CO*C> 



«nqq-c» 

d CO d «H CM 



CM T 



lOOOOSMCO 
CO CO — .rq'~ 
©" d -T — * -r" 



2So 

© CM CM 
t - CO CO 
ClOO 

— * d d 



OO CO CO o o 
« CO CM © © 



f in CO © CM 
m CM CO CO OO 
»C CM CO — CO 



lomco-f 
iiocaq 
ft-< "t" cm* co* 



oo -r in O -r ct-m 

— o -r co in oo © q 

cd io M oo Cinoi 

co o to co m_ m_ c i o 

od co" CM T* -rr ©" oo" -r 



o «1 « 



Oh 



Cl O N CJ CO T 



CO 1^ CO CO CO 
CO CM O O CO 

in -f to in 

CM f 00 CM 
CO_O0_©_0C_O_ 

sVujo'c" 
cm r ~ 

m T CM CM CO 



— re y rr i/t 

© to © CO 

f OMfN 



-r -r r- cm — 

cm cm OO to oo 

tC * ■ to CM 

co cm in m o 



r~ oo -r r~ © 



to © >n 

co in co 
r~ oo CO 



m © to 
oo O to 
d © d 



O T3 O 00 ~ 

i- d © d d 



■f to co © r- 
cm in q © f 
to rr d © -r 
co m m t m 



cm oo q q q 
d c-> d © © 
m oo o o o 
cm -r uo to in 



OC1U) 

© -« q 
in co cm 
cm oo r- 
— in m 

CM*CM"d 
CM CO OO 



qoocoqw 
* co to d to ccddiooo 

O CM o CO 



00 O O © O ©CO 

cooqqq aqq 

t-.: d © d © cm d d 

m cm cm © o © © — 



oo t co m m 



H u cj *3 



^ -r O <c 



• cm m © m 
■ cm_ -r — CM 

r«"co 



CM — CO CO f 

in i-h © 

cm iri cm «rf in 

© 00 Oi CO CO 
CO © O0 © CM 

m~ oo" d — ' ©" 
oo co co oo in 

CO -J> CM CM r- 



© oo • 



co r~ 



— ^ cm < 
d -" — i> d 
co co ©_t— _cq 
rrdddd 
co — cm r- ••j" 

CM CO CO ~* CO 



m — r~ © 
) r- ~ co ^ 
CM — © d CO 
© m — ' oo 
cm t qoo_ cm 
dd ©*©"©* 
00 Ci -r co o 
CO — — — CM 



C0©-J>— © 

r-- co co co © 
d — d d 
© co m © co 



> co oc m co co cm o co co 



— < CO 



— — to cm 
cdoo-rciN 
r~ -r t m — 
oc t^-_ oc o_ 

CM OO CM — m 



oo d oo — oo 

CO © 00 CM I" 



O © CO 
t>- CO -H 

CO r*" d 
t - CI o 

oo_co 

CO -h CM 



CO CO -OOCCN 
CO CM CM OC 00 

co © co i"— in 
©_ cm co cq_t~~ in 
h-T — " 'r"r>."co"co"co" 
oo t ^ © — 



oo co © in oo 
~- co © cm in 
© oo cm' in d 

CO © T CM OO 



f m co co co 

© CO CM -rr ~ 

©co oo aid 
co cm r-» tt« m 
— CO r~ CM to 



in co oc oc *t 

CO © CO CM 

d d oo co 
© co r~ to 



— in co 
-r — in 
cm in m 
co"©"oo" 

CO C-l — < 



CM N CO CJ N 

to tr co co <-<_ 
co" oo" oc* — " cm" 



co to r- — cm 
co rf cm m 

cm oo m co ~ 
co_© OO CO CO 
dcodoo"— " 



Co'd-^ "©""J." 



CO C5 ^- T 00 

cm cm m to q 



oo in q 

to 3C r~ 
— © © 



loftocs c~) m -r 



5 



o t « 

*<3| 



CM "5f< CO < 

in in — © oo — . r-- in © 
cc^-ric d cm »— " © d 
oc — co co 
oo weqecoo 
c"©"dd co" 



w ■ 



f t^-<f © ■ 



> r- co oo m co m m 



r- co co co co 



cm ^ " ■ 



OO CO oo 

^qqo' _ 

c-i in x -r oc cnnc'O d — 

Ifl N N O C) ICNCCOOO CO CO — I 

oq © rr cq_ co_ ee> oc cm_ cm •-< c-J_ 

cm" co" — " d d ©" r~" r-" d © co ~r 

c-d cj — co oo c t> m f to — co 

T-Xtf CN- CO CM CM CM CM m CO CO 



_ in o 

S 2"C 



: = 

. c 



£«£ s - o Sri fcs 
t ^ & c g ec9 

^^©^w escort 



*i ® § 

e«.*i O 



Maryland State Department of Education 



uo cd ce o> oo 



Hi OOOOMOO 

CO li CONOO 

■° — 55 "X ° J2 tw:o3-.c 

— — © "0 — CO CCtf« oo 



""» r- »p o co 



— — © 



CD os Hi -r 



on ic m oo 

OS CO CD 1/0 «/5 

io io re m 

oi m y. ~> 



© 00 CD CM O INWOOWM 

O-f -rreo -r -r co "0 

i/i cm ci cd cm — — os cd 

CT. r - co io — i oo — — 



■o — o 



M 3 



£ O 3 



OXDI-OOM OOM^OO 

oc -p co ~r io intqvq- 

co co co "d cm cd oo © tp 

115 1"T O "N w CO f 

© — CO lf5 fU5<0 00!0 

-p" os" — * r-~ 



r- cm ci o: © — © co 

© CO 00 OS OS — OS t~ 00 

Orodio oi cd — ' ci -p 

co-p — cm co — — tpcm 



OS OO CO 

-r — CO 

CD co — 



— — mo oo -r i» 

t- Cl C « Cl — OO CO -T — 

o co >d cd id ci t» n 

U5000NO l<0 — © U5 CM 
CO © © CO 

-p'©" — <* — 



io r~ oo — os 



I 1< CD OCOOOO 



OS — "0 Cl> OC CO T "0 CO 
— tp © OO CM CO — to "0 



0- 



U5NO>-<0 — OtOO 

cdirfudood oc c cd — o 

CO 1/0 *r CO OO — — CO 00 o 

ci ci n « qcioqqco 

cir-Tdcdco os co" — " — ai" 

CM lf5 CO — CD NCOOOOCC 



OfNCO MONMOO — OO OO 

OtCOlC C31iCf*COC) ONX 

— © tp CO — cd cd © cs — CM CM 

UOOCOOS OCCWO © — — 

C)iON-r ciajNOtO >OiOCS 

cor^" — "t-" co co ©* cm pJ ciuo"«o 



OO CD CD "5 



CD < 



i 00 © © CM T O 



CO 00 TP 

co — — < 



OOlOOO) 
O O O © CD 

rid^doo 



oo oo o CM CO 
00 CO o >o — 
■*Trd«jcd 



NCCCCO CD ~P © © © 
CD CO CD tp O CO O C O 

oo oc co —3 idoicddd 



CO © CD 00 " 



i cr a a 
lOOUJ 



OO © CM O 
— © © © 

loddd tUcoooo 

CCTC CO OO — a o 



CM CM O O O 



O © 
o" © 
o © 



si*- 



OS © © CO ei 
TP CM CD TP O 



NOOOOOOl 



CO OS 00 © 



"OOOiOO CM lO — 



C5 «0 rr 
CM"t-^CM"od«i5 

co co 



OO irO 00 oc — 
00 CO O CJ lO 
O CO TP CS CD 
OS O O CM TP 

co*»o*©"©"o6" 



CM CD I 

»cp os t- oo 

— © ©_ — 

co"ie"io"r~ 



l/3t~00 — CM CD UO CD 

riuicJoCN cd cm tp 

ci f- c: x oc co O 

— OS 00 CO CO T 00 00 

tCco't-Tod'os* co"©"©" 



— IC CD CD lO 00 CD OO 

— co Misocoa 



TP CM — 



O OS CM TP 00 
CM OS lO CM OS 
CM — TP © 00 

ci io r 



Ol ~ I - CO — ( 



OS © CO t^- TP 

dcit^idd 
tp Hi io cm cd 

OS CD O CM Hi 
CD* CM* cm"— " 
'CP CO CO CM 



OO — — CD oo 
OS CM CD tp tp 

— lO — HO 
©"©*<" co"— " 

— IOCO- 



— tp m cm 

— — CD o 
r- - oo cd cd >. 
ncoo oo co os i- 



— — OS t^. CO OA CO 00 

CiONCCl CD CD ~> 

doc'oo CD © TP 

W UJ W'J OS |T TP TP WO 

lOOXt I/O © -P CO 00 CM TP I/O 

cm"oo"— "os" irs"©"— "o-'t^" — "tp"co" 

CI — CI -r lO — CO CM — CO CO 



— o 
-3 0) 

P s 



oc — r- t>- © © oc co os in 

CCNNin CO© — — © 

cd **i cm oc cm r-l cd — ni id 

© oo r~ — occotptpcm 

— CM — 1/5 © OS oo — CM 

© co" oo" ©" ©" uS Tp" oo 



OS CM © © 

co tp os © 

CD OS OS 00 



r~ © — CM *T 



CO CCt^OJNO 



■ Hi os co © 



© CN 

- ~ 



.5 !> 
5-= 



©3 = s« rt e« oj= p £; 



CofoQiSEH 



ill 

l.g o 



232 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



M 

d 

t3 
d 
W 

S3 



e 

9 
■d 

U 

i 

■a 

4) 
u 

e 
"3 

y 

u 

a 

s 

-a 
d 

3 

SB 



0> 
X 

c 

a 

x 

d 

B 

h 

5 



o « « 

111 



'Sou? 

IONO) ci co o CO 'O 



•osr-coo — iiocn-co 

i - co ci co oi to ■* -r 

; od •-« os ci uiaa- 1 »r 

. OS •— * O CO OS OS lOt- 

o. os co co —i ro cj co oo 



O -t" CI f O QOOfCNiO 

qii)co(N« os o i; co -r 

d ce oi i» ^ «o t -1 co »o — • 

lOfintf o os oc co co 

M !D CO CO CO ««f U5CI 



-rococo xcOfOco 

CO OV CM CI CO CI tC "O f 

doicdai ad 

NMMN 00 00 

COCOCOiO Q CN CI CO - 



"5 CO C 

3# t -I -r or, ~ 
o orj o us o-. 



CI co io io ci 
r- os ci -> -r 
<N io « d d 
i-oooic- 

O O0 1-4 — I 



CIIOG-- 



r~ ci o — ci cc o — « 
— > t-c co oii-oioifl 
>d r^l id -r loaiooden 



— ci co 



r» —. < _ 

ci co « ci o rl^irids 

CO CO 00 O CO 00 OS OO — > CI CO 

CI CO 00 OS CO lONOaOl 

CO f"o' — " — <".-<" 



CCNCK 1 OWMf N COOlOl 

cecooi-. — • i co co us ucjoooo 

adocot~ ci co cd cc d ci cd ci 

0"> r~ -r co io co io co ci •— < r~ 

NIO<h* co_0_co_cooo ciaooi 

— ■" —"cm" r~ — " — <" — " — <" 



us — • os -r c> i 



os -r 1 — . 



co ci io co 

l-CCOl-'T 

I -" CI ci" — eS 



I -T> CO — Q 

CO •— • us O 



OiOlOOiCO 
COCOCOC1U5 



000-< COOifl'O')' ooo- 

ciooo a N U5 00 co —« — 

co -r -r -r os r~ os id jidt> 

OCMN CO CO CI CO CI trOOI- 

CCNOlO) t - CldWOb "lOOl- 





8 


c> 

• CI 


00 


US 


OS 


; <o 

;gs 


: o 

. CO 



— CO O 
co -r O 
"OCOO 



us oc o o r^cooo 

f iflOl- CO OS O O 

-r — o o cooo'o' 

l>0>00 o co - io 



© 


• 00 


o 


: «o 


co 


i>. 
*°. 




cT 

CO 



— CO OS O US 

ciioocce 

OJC-ICIOCI 



I O O O CO O O C 
.oo»o USOOC 



COCK5N 

r— o ci »— » 
ci -r -r — 
— * CI — ~ — ' 



lei' 



iO-flON>0 

ci -r cd -r cd 
x kj «5 o a 
— >_ — io — <_ co_ 

co" os" r^T us" od 
co co -»* O us 



o cs co cc cm — oscoco ucj co »— < 

us co oo t-. co -T ci o •*'T0O 

-r-rcoai cor^ac-rr^ o od — 

OS O us CI O CI -r Cs O Nt»(- 

co ci os_ o> co_ oo oq ci co_ r~ ph 

cs" •->" co" us" r-T <- T isT cc" os vdco" 



CO 



CO *- < 



i r*- cc cc « o n e ■ 



MO^-O 
— C. -T C I O 

us cc co o 



us os ci cs us co us us us r~os© 



o os o oo co oet-.us 
co id co o ci oouj^ 
us os os us ci co o epos 



— co us oo 

cd o cc c 
- e 
-r co us ts. s^oqco 
us" id co" us" us" co" cc" cc. 



» O; O U. C 
— CM — ;<BO 

ci" t^-rcius 



O us CO 

ci r-I — ^ ci cd 

O CI US — < OS 

OS CI CO OS 



USCO-HCN wOl-ON OSOSK 

OS "9" CI O fCOWON TP CO OS 

oscocd-a- ci os -r r~ cociod 

cccococo COCOOO— CCN« 

cs uo r- ci roosoot^us oo-^co 

-fci-os* ci"cicc"u5*— ." ^h* co- 



co OOOf , 



O -r 



NCOONCI 
— < CI "*^J< CO 

coodcT-rr^'' 
co cm — 



— U5 — CO us 
cc"o'tj."o"©~ 

• CO CI *— 



cs i— < i— 1 1^- ci 



OS coco 
N CO d 
CS CS 



III 



US CO US <M 



Of oo 
U5 <M CO 
00 CO -i 5 CO 



lOOCOOCC 



m Cl C. O r" h.^CO 

cd os ci o o 

COO lOtO-O OS CO CO 

COTU5.-I t^aOS'f t» o_ t ^ 

os— <"co"oc cd""^"rCo"'eo oojoT 



<o — ' 



=5 O co c9 CO 



fc^ga'g °|S|J 

J,Sjojg S-O^O ££^J« 



.9'gl 
-So" 



Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE XXV 

State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Schools Grades 1 to 12: 

1953-54 



County 


Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for Minimum 
Program 


Total 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 
Current Ex- 
pense Costs 


Transporta- 
tion 


Amount 


Per Cent 


Total State 


$61,724,572 


$45,317,907 


$11,329,476 


$5,077,189 


$26,972,362 


43 


.7 


Baltimore City . . . 


tl7,317,375 


13,853,900 


3,463,475 




4,286,020 


24 


.7 


Total Counties . 


44,407,197 


31,464,007 


7,866,001 


5,077,189 


22,686,342 


51 


.1 


Allegany 


2,740,959 


1,980,784 


495,196 


264,979 


1,695,156 


61 


.8 


Anne Arundel . . 


3,601,210 


2,595,844 


648,961 


356,405 


2,276,527 


63 


.2 


Baltimore 


7,168,339 


5,185,356 


1,296,340 


686,643 


1,824,890 


25 


.5 


Calvert 


566,057 


348,390 


87,097 


130,570 


463,254 


81 


.8 


Caroline 


758,770 


503,469 


125,867 


129,434 


566,542 


74 


.7 


Carroll 


1,445,642 


1,015,558 


253,890 


176,194 


870,839 


60 


2 


Cecil 


1,181,946 


822,610 


205,652 


153,684 


700,736 


59 


3 


Charles 


1,032,379 


685,485 


171,371 


175,523 


849,132 


82 


3 


Dorchester .... 


976,884 


648,130 


162,032 


166,722 


600,442 


61 


5 


Frederick 


1,774,599 


1,230,986 


307,747 


235,866 


994,869 


56 


1 


Garrett 


942,222 


559,305 


139,827 


243,090 


765,361 


81 


2 


Harford 


1,758,174 


1,188,055 


297,014 


273,105 


872,264 


49 


6 


Howard 


908,456 


613,500 


153,375 


141,581 


648,663 


71 


4 


Kent 


563,291 


369,795 


92,449 


101,047 


388,436 


68 


9 


Montgomery . . . 


5,722,469 


4,276,668 


1,069,167 


376,634 


1,351,705 


23 


6 


Prince George's 


5,944,021 


4,427,655 


1,106,913 


409,453 


3,365,063 


56 


6 


Queen Anne's . 


613,075 


396,125 


99,031 


117,919 


408,117 


66 


6 


St. Mary's 


666,961 


418,224 


104,556 


144,181 


505,343 


75 


8 


Somerset 


710,137 


482,216 


120,554 


107,367 


562,133 


79 


1 


Talbot 


688,986 


472,150 


118,037 


98,799 


418,840 


60 


8 


Washington. . . . 


2,625,080 


1,905,983 


476,495 


242,602 


1,458,143 


55 


5 


Wicomico 


1,168,768 


789,984 


197,496 


181,288 


624,369 


53 


4 


Worcester 


848,772 


547,735 


136,934 


164,103 

1 


476,018 


56 


1 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: (a) total mini- 
mum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State law; (b) other 
current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction other than 
the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and (c) the cost of approved transportation to public 
schools. 

t December, 1953, calculation. 



134 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



I! 



:S 2 



:S 8 



piiiiiipfis 



p§3fi§m 



|H|3MaiSI"B 

lilislislspi 



| : :|§3SS8 : : : : SSSSS : : : :» isSgSSSgSS : : 



12 « ^, to oo 



g S 8SS g388338 E - 



g = &32SgSS3fc 



g^SSS : : : :s |SSS8SS5 3 



gjjSSS : : : : 5 8 8 SS 8SS2Sir 



§2SS&8S?§8 : := g : :83S&38S5 g : :2 S 3 K |8S :2| 



"pSsSSSSSSSS : :2 



llSIJISIliSSS I.ISIIM5P.5. |ll|l.=l|liI3| 



f! 



ill 




JllUIJl! 



Maryland State Department of Education 

: : g -v ^ : 



235 



8~» 2— 



8« 



is2< 



CHBS IIS 8SS>3*i ijssfsssssgssss piHRN ill— 



§2 :S3SS2 



£g2 : : .2?; 



■e» -co — coT^= — 5m 



2^ 



82838^3 



g-2S£222S; 



= *8 



?!3 



882 



2-i 



'28 3 £2 |22£S222;S 



S22S2S2 



.as 



:2SS £282^2 £28£S: 



£32 



22 



225852228 : 



"§^8883" 



SS 



^2lT 



3-2S8S2 



g2£2S^28 



222^ 



iSS" 



: :2SS 



£38 8882825 |^£S3£222 : :2 



SSS 25£22-£ 883SS8£?;S2 :S 



2^2S^^2" 



§ :2S£ SSS S£82S*5 



|W^cf§W22^2 
"p5Wg^^2-22 



S22S388-22 



"p^2WW 



§22S£S£-25 



8SS 



SW^p^S^22^ 



3£S §882523 



3S5ig lli §§8*1*2 giiilsiipsss SSSgssgsste 

83888 i§§ M8S«»8 3(S83tflB58 RR S» iSSiSiS aR 2 m K "H 



g2-2^ £88 gSS^S^S £282S22:=2 




236 



il 



9 



m 



H 



it. 



sir 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



8 :83 



pFIPPl gas tnim 



23233 : : SC3 



ISSiPl 



g — :S§ 1 SS22222 : : : 323 SSSSSS : : SS^ 



-r - « -o ^ - 



00 03 0*01 



gp^gSS : :2 £33" 



S-2"S2 :g ggS<°l22 : :§ ^ S3S5SS22 £33 



2 — 1 
S~2~SS :5 



§SgSS = 2-p2 



5 — S3 5 



£-°°2 : S S!§ 



H28 



g-22 



8 :S3S3S3§S:3 SSS 



| :3SSS3 



§222 



I ***** 



8**38838 IRSSSiSSSI Iil lilflii SSgSSSi 



111 



i 




Maryland State Department of Education 

g :» :s :::::::: :s : « :::::::::::: 



237 



§S§ : : : : : 1 



PPP&iS : : : : :8S 



5 IS :2< 



pilisiiiSlilPl 



IIIMIIilflSIISP^i PP1 

§|SSSSSC:S :::::«-::: : 



11^ 



: : : : :SS i : : gSSSS" 
SgSSSSSSSg : : : : :2£ : : : 



ggfipili 



SSSS2SS fffpSSSS : : : : : :g 



SSKSSSSSgg : : : : :a*5 
SgSSSSSSS : : : : 



as*-- 



SSI 2 **** : : : : : : SglSgSSSS 



= ^ ggfeSSSSS : : : : : 
|fe|SSBS£5^ fTTTTTi 



SIS^fttBSS : : : : ^ 



fgPPI^ : : : : : : : 



:2S£Sg£o222SS :g 
:!=38SSSS S S§g :S 



"piss 



fssss 



t 



§ : ISlSiiSillgllSljM 



WfiiiilMliiiipsf 



lilff 



MpiiliiMlfilPii 

2 — - 



IIHF 




38 



i 



3* 



Eighty-Eighth Annual Repoet 

:::::: :::::::: 2 2 S£ : 



SS : : : : : : §ggS 
5325 : : : . 



S3 



:::::: §g — 8 : i : : 5^2 : SsS22-2~ : : 

ssPP IPP^IS sin piisiPiiP ips*i 



SS^S : : : : §223 ag25835 : S 2? ss- : :£ 
S2~£ : : : : KS2S jfS-2282 32- 



2* 



li 



2 2 



a 



S2-2 : :2 = 



gS2^ 



:g 



S2-2 : :g= SS2~ SS2?12^?i 



SS2 



31=^ 



£2 



¥ss2~ 



S2S :2» 



SS 5 ^ £2 
2S525- S2 



f23S~ 



SS^S* :S2 



W~22- 



"p2^Ts2 

|S2S* :S2 



2§SW 



2S52S* 



fl2W2^2 



2S25" 



gP22§ 



f|2~ 



2 - 3 ?5 S - 



|2-^ 
lf2W 



H5S«3I 



HI? 



5 :-?5 = 2 



4? 



g2S-2^ S2 t -2" s -22 K32£ g8S88288 , « 5 88Si oJ SS^^S 



ii jii j 




Maryland State Department of Education 



t~ cm «n 



I- 00 — 00 



OO CM ■ T lOI-l- 



co ■ "t* -daiioioo Siooc 

CM — f — <M CM O — CM >0 



CM — CO »0 • 



OO — CO I- CO CM 

os • — os r~ i- co 

CO — CO I- T!D 



co *r o uo 

•V CO 



OS t~ CM "0 CM 



co cc oo cm -r 
co CO ' co 

— I CO l~ — I 



> — 1^ OO CO COOl CM 



»N (NO 



os — i cm cm — —i 



cm -co ■'rci-H 



' CM CM I-IOM 



>TlO<ON-HU5 os -f 



CO CO CO CO ■ OS ITS I 

t~ — — CM — OO cr> • O OC ■ 



— ' »0 — • — 



1/0 CO CO CO — OS 



■f OOCOCM COCOO Tl-I- 

O CO CM — I CO — 



"0 Os OS — t— OS 
O — — CO CM 



IOC5C1 — CM 



I CO O CO *J* OS 

! — CO CO — OO — 



■t-toco - — • oo co moos 



I CO CM CO — CO 



■CM ■ CO 00 CM 00 - CM CM < 



fC-ON OS OS OS 
»n — co co io — 



2 « 



os r-- oo cm co os —> 
io cm cm -r — ■ t oo 



co cm 

•TNN^ioci io r~ 

cr. co cm -r cm co os co 

— 00 o 

co_ 

OO CO 00 CM CO o. o oo 

x o o -r - h- co co 

— » oo 

^ CM_ 

cm o — oo co 

co <~ ci — uo co 

t~ CM Mf-O 

os cm oo co m —< ■ • ■ • • • '■ • • ~ 
x ic c: X * « 

"0 CM CM CO — lO 

00 CM CM — < CO O 

— «5 OO — OS OO 

OS — — CM CM 



■<J1 



3 £^6 



tscj£ 



i o u 



c .2 !? 



«s ■ 



! C->li 

. jcjOT 



s s 



£ ° 
^ o 



|a I 

Irt^ s 
3 o. 3 

^ >0 o 

•pes 

1 * 3 g 

cr. c ~ .3 
c; w H — 



5 a 



<;SQ 



240 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 

TABLE XXVII— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland Countj 



County 
Name of High School 



Total 
Enroll- 
ment 



Core 



English 



Social 
Studies 



Science 



Mathe- 
matics 



1 Allegany 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



Old town Sr.-Jr 

Flintetone Sr.-Jr 

Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 

Allegany Sr.-Jr 

Bruce Sr.-Jr 

Valley Sr.-Jr 

Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr. . . . 

Beall Sr.-Jr 

Cresaptown Jr 

Beall Elem.-Jr 

Penn. Ave. Elem-Jr. . . 
Carver Colored Sr - Jr. 



14 Anne Arundel 

15 Glen Burnie Sr 

Annapolis Sr 

Southern Sr.-Jr 

Arundel Sr.-Jr 

George Fox Jr 

Brooklyn Park Jr. . . 

Glen Burnie Jr 

Annapolis Jr 

Bates Colored Sr.-Jr. 



24 Baltimore 

25 Dundalk Sr 

26 Kenwood Sr 

27 Catonaville Sr.-Jr 

28 Milford Mill Sr.-Jr 

29 Franklin Sr.-Jr 

30 Hereford Sr.-Jr 

31 Towson Sr.-Jr 

32 Parkville Sr.-Jr 

33 Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr 

34 Towson Jr 

35 Carroll Manor Jr 

36 North Point Jr 

37 Stemmers Run Jr 

38 8 Elem. Schools with Jr. 7 . 

39 Benneker Colored Sr.-Jr. . . . 

40 Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 

41 Sollers Point Colored Sr.-Jr. 



42 Calvert 

43 Calvert County Sr.-Jr. 

44 Brooks Colored Sr.-Jr. 

45 Caroline. 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 



Greensboro Sr.-Jr 

Caroline Sr.-Jr 

Preston Sr.-Jr 

Federalsburg Sr.-Jr 

Ridgely Sr.-Jr 

Lockerman Colored Sr.-Jr. 



52 Carroll 

53 Tanevtown Sr.-Jr 

54 Sykesville Sr.-Jr 

55 Manchester Sr.-Jr 

56 Westminster Sr.-Jr. . . . 

57 Hampstead Sr.-Jr 

58 New Windsor Sr.-Jr. . . 

59 Elmer Wolfe Sr.-Jr . . . 

60 Mountv Airy Sr.-Jr 

61 Charles Carroll Jr 

62 Sandymount Elem.-Jr. . 

63 Moton Colored Sr.-Jr. . 

64 Johnsville Colored Jr. 



3,841 3 
96 
133! 
1 ,019 

7881 
334 
379 
2571 
490] 
108 
98 
73 
66 



636 
336 
202 
515 
432 
241 
567 
655 
825 

9 ,929 9 
426i 
709! 

1 ,124 1 
74> 
346 
412| 
807 



,266 



3,403 3,212 3,241 3 ,025 3 ,229 2 ,711 

78! 92 78l 92 89 102 

107 88 1071 881 106! 81 

1,019 962jl ,019i 928: 879 

13 761 | 720, 719 671 

25 298 283 274 273 

130 233! 2491 213 204 

3ll 215 184| 166 171 

5 470 434! 443 



,5*7 2 
662 
437 
179 
539 
432 
236 
532 
607 IV 
963 



2,155 



68 



K5 



56 



2,140 2,431 

636, 662 



5.5SS 



920 
487 1 
523 
75 
922 
1 ,354 1 
312 
120 
219 
425 

600 
356 
244 

842 
154 
198 

92 
170 

48 
180 



803 
4061 
427 
923' 
845 
499! 
524| 
91 
779 
,254 1 
3171 
110 
201! 
«7 

535 
2951 
240 

764 
173 
162 

71 
145 

48 
165 



6,204 



646 
473 
211 

268 
222 
746 
270 
523 
7.5 
922 



591 
505 

228 
280 ! 
228! 
670 
256 1 
.52! 
91 
779 



825 

3 ,328 3 
426 
708 
47s 
2651 
135' 
144 
583 
174 
217 



2 ,883 
96 
100 

760 777 
528! 562 



2 ,453 
109 
98 
625 
427 



621 

2841 231 1 251 
302 271i 260| 252 



399 
59, 
85 



66 55 



1 ,985 
586 
334 
193 
140 



354 1 ,254 

312, 316 



83 
161 
322 



69! 
133 
280 



160 133 440 

891 73: 267 



1 ,814 1 ,860 
I 165! 175 
I 203! 207 
176 206 
582 563 



121 
101 



99 110 
211 i 183 



65 Cecil. 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 



Cecilton Sr.-Jr 

Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr. 

Elkton Sr.-Jr 

North East Sr.-Jr 

Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 

Perryville Sr.-Jr 

Kenmore Jr 

Calvert Jr 

Carver Colored Sr.-Jr. . 



11,353 
! 94 

. 90 



1 ,350 
84 

92 

399' 342 
2431 262 
205 249 



381 
68 
73 
32 
95 
20 
93 



6( 

348 
77 
5, 
32 
87 
28 
70 



173 

461 
86 

125 
60 
75 
28 
87 

1 ,814 1 
165 
203: 
176 
582, 
121i 
101! 
99 
2111 
44 
20 
82 
10 



963 

725 3 

454 

777 

518 

293 

178 

147 

694 

175 

243 



2,362 
604 
434 
171 
190 



209 151 

394 I 294 

108 103 

98 95 

73 .51 

66; 44 



169 148 

3591 318 
108 103 



732 963 

324 3,702 9 

426 4.55 

7041 765! 

476 516 1 

270! 296i 

134 177 

144 1471 

581; 682: 

174i 175 

217 243 



39 
5^ 
20 
95 



41 
68 
137 

388 
222 



,991 1 2, 821 

5031 369 

218 258 

185! 153 

344 311 

249 276 

143 159 

565 531! 

397 1 328! 

387 436 

,099 8,278'8 

341 231 

484 419 

,068 911 

703 686 

303 260 

397 369 I 

549 541 

897i 817 

440 382 

523 524 

75 91 

922 I 779 
,354 1 ,254 

312| 316 

111 94 

218 201 

402; 403 

45l! 406 

220 173 

231, 233 



,623 3633 

3571 375 

206! 205 

162| 123 

459 411 

249] 276 

241 236 

565 531 

655 607 

729! 839 



7 ,473 



21S 
774 

, 620 
268 280 
316| 322 
582| 536 
878 I 732 
384 1 299 
523! 524 
75 91 
922 I 779 
,3.54 1 ,2.54 
312 316 
96 1 98 
203 177 
408 367 



499 
302 
197 



410: 762) 651 
95 132 144 
107' 182 
77 



39 



57 156 
17 48 
95 167 



670 
101 

135 140 



145 



420 
220 
200 

598 

123 
99 
62 

120 
48 

146 



175 
207 ! 
206 
563 
119 
134 
110 
183 
44 
18, 
83 
IS 



1 ,810 1 ,841 1 ,690 1 ,624 1 ,402 1 ,404 39 



165 175 14 
203 207! 19 
176 206 173 



156 144 138 



172 148 
136 161 



582 562 521 460 428; 399 



117 1181 121 



101 134 



99 100 
211 176 194 158 



107 
95 122 
87! 102 



539 513 814 835 813 



142 



43 
101 1 



38 
55 
162 
116 
76 

28 
29 1 
35 



56 
3.5 



44 

IS 



18 



10 



831 1,223 1,175 1,134 1,040 



74 1 95 
69 ; 92 
153 130 



94 
70 



941 84 



144 237 196 237 194 353 



70; 

288: 



107 127 
129 



155' 125 
152 



153 213 218 



142 154 142. 154 
8 6 8 6 



129, 152 178' 
141| 



36 
43 

95I 



225 

137 
27 
431 43 
90 101 



288 228 
221 178 
147 
124 
36 



122 

27; 
43 
971 



Maryland State Department of Education 



Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1954 





French 



B 






Ar 
cult 


ri- 
urc 


Industrie 


1 

u 

Edu. 


Home 

ESconomi 


cs 
Voc. 


)-tiit;ifw>oi< 






1 

Art- Arte 
and Crafta 




G 






(icn. 


• 

Voc. 


Ar 


ts 




Qt 


n. 




Sub 


ecte 


Bduc 


ation 








B 




G 


B 


B 


B 


G 



B 


B 


G 


(5 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


57 


93 


67 


71 


112 


65 


1,848 




230 




1,640 


358 


692 


985 


2,767 


2,318 


2,706 


2 ,562 


1,319 


1 ,222 


2 










96 










55 


54 




96 


106 


69 


103 




3 












65 


42 








35 


53 






120 


101 


89 


113 






4 






33 


22 


16 




453 




69 




419 


47 


136 


278 


760 


580 


819 


699 


370 


351 


5 


23 


23 


34 


49 






127 








332 


24 


213 


268 


558 


441 


490 


419 


296 


246 


6 


8 


22 










119 




53 




110 


77 


70 


121 


246 


214 


257 


242 






7 


11 


17 










247 








238 




125 


146 


270 


250 


228 


257 


2ie 


208 


8 














199 








126 


7 


48 


65 


215 


153 


127 


146 


151 


116 


9 


15 


31 










227 




83 




202 


75 


100 


107 


208 


209 


293 


286 


188 


203 


10 














108 








103 








108 


103 


108 


103 






11 






























98 


95 


98 


95 


98 


95 


12 






























73 


51 


73 


51 






13 














26 




25 




20 


21 






15 


15 


55 


48 






14 


222 


247 


32 


127 


54 


88 


3,147 


11 


385 


4 


3,435 




232 


750 


3,964 


3,750 


2,765 


3,220 


2,47512,157 


15 


64 


79 








272 


11 


232 




233 




72 


295 


412 


196 


73 


341 


60 


68 


[6 


35 


54 


18 


40 






176 








129 




49 


172 


240 


294 


87 


128 


24 


68 


.7 


19 


24 








49 


139 








132 




28 


56 


195 


148 


116 


129 






.8 


30 


20 








39 


395 








423 




49 


93 


489 


515 


355 


355 


3i4 


296 


9 














432 








432 








432 


432 


369 


386 


408 


350 


i 














241 








236 








241 


236 


202 


196 


220 


198 


!1 














565 








531 








565 


531 


481 


479 


474 


404 


!2 


37 


44 










655 








607 








655 


597 


526 


503 


576 


529 


!3 


37 


26 


14 


87 


54 




272 




153 


4 


712 




34 


134 


705 


801 


556 


703 


399 


244 


!4 


336 


416 


266 


220 


29 


84 


5,963 


8 


168 


39 


5,178 


21 


783 


2,597 


9,450 


9,486 


7,065 


7,136 


6,101 


5,712 


15 


72 


47 








220 






25 


172 




128 


368 


418 


432 


67 


71 


77 


42 


16 


33 


45 


67 


58 






381 




6i 




174 




125 


576 


681 


754 


173 


326 


73 


61 


17 


38 


34 


41 


31 






843 








714 




150 


524 


694 


720 


657 


637 


336 


295 


18 


36 


58 


20 


' 






404 




8 


1 


452 




90 


197 


747 


802 


503 


563 


489 


534 


'9 


5 


10 






29 


33 


195 








235 




38 


127 


346 


401 


234 


300 


130 


206 


;o 


17 


24 








51 


205 








221 




34 


102 


412 


427 


285 


305 


276 


291 


.1 


60 


111 


iii 


112 






426 




77 


12 


317 




148 


305 


778 


889 


297 


372 


280 


303 


;2 


26 


21 


27 


12 






589 








495 




9 


105 


905 


834 


769 


732 


798 


691 


;3 


22 


25 










423 








302 




33 


197 


537 


543 


163 


177 


183 


175 


■1 














270 








292 








523 


524 


523 


524 


286 


254 


5 














47 








60 








75 


91 


75 


91 


75 


91 


6 














571 








502 








906 


768 


922 


779 


922 


779 


7 














867 








764 








1,354 


1,254 


1,354 


1,254 


1 ,354 


1 ,254 


8 






























312 


316 


312 


316 


312 


*316 


9 


7 


15 










108 








86 




3 


11 


120 


110 


129 


95 


83 


69 

















152 








149 




20 


30 


217 


204 


188 


193 


196 


158 


1 


20 


26 










262 




22 


i 


243 


21 


5 


55 


425 


417 


414 


401 


231 


193 


£ 


17 


38 






16 


89 


236 








318 


72 


108 


122 


441 


379 


347 


303 


226 


73 


3 


8 


18 








54 


189 








144 


20 


88 


91 


226 


182 


164 


131 


89 


73 


4 


9 


20 






16 


35 


47 








174 


52 


20 


31 


215 


197 


183 


172 


137 




5 


14 


22 






28 


111 


543 






14 


465 


73 


129 


175 


814 


741 


567 


660 


44 


37 


6 


3 


10 










134 








103 




53 


52 


152 


173 


108 


237 






7 


11 


12 








39 


122 








96 




35 


41 


188 


150 


119 


102 






8 












30 


32 








64 








84 


69 


47 


47 






9 














143 








121 




22 


38 


165 


145 


114 


110 





















21 






14 


48 








46 


48 










1 












42 


91 








33 


73 


i9 


44 


179 


156 


179 


164 


44 


37 


2 


83 


85 








88 


1,499 




37 


22 


1,385 


59 


451 


606 


1,717 


1,743 


1,383 


1,579 


23 


59 


3 












17 


156 








164 




32 


52 


165 


164 


109 


109 






4 


ii 


13 










165 








172 




56 


73 


195 


203 


142 


152 






5 


7 


4 










150 








142 




56 


74 


173 


203 


117 


167 






6 


36 


37 










453 




37 




366 




134 


187 


502 


488 


423 


506 


13 


41 


7 


19 


13 










78 






22 


88 


11 


32 


36 


121 


118 


79 


102 






8 


2 


6 










97 








121 




47 


66 


101 


126 


82 


107 






9 












28 


83 








89 




36 


44 


99 


103 


105 


126 









8 


12 








43 


171 








126 


20 


39 


63 


208 


176 


17(1 


147 






1 














44 








44 








41 


43 


44 


44 






2 














20 








18 








20 


18 


20 


18 






3 














82 








55 


28 


19 


11 


82 


83 


82 


83 






4 






























10 


18 


10 


18 


10 


is 


5 


15 


16 


70 


52 


J 57 


827 


85 




34 


885 


34 


241 


451 


1,068 


968 


804 


829 


244 


52 


6 


3 


6 






.. .. 


94 






5 


62 




2 


26 


85 


75 


71 


69 


















84 








70 




10 


31 


69 


24 


22 


24 






8 






29 


20 






110 


5 






234 




120 


121 


296 


238 


269 


245 


177 




9 






21 


13 






1 21 i 






135 




35 


139 


165 


184 


126 


110 


67 


52 









20 


19 




57 


118 


37 






132 




54 


90 


178 


182 


83 


149 






1 


12 


10 










120! 






119 




20 


44 


95 


98 


95 


98 






2 














36 






27 








36 


27 


23 


18 






3 














43 


43 




29 


43 








43 


43 


43 


43 






4 














101 .. 

J 






63| 34 

1 






101 


97 


72 


73 







242 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE XXVII C ontinued Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Ek 







Total 


























Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Social 


Science 


Mathe- 




OoU \T V 


ment 










Studies 






matics 




hlama *%t \\ \ r\\ Rf»hfW%l 
\.IMI< \Jl 1 II_ r| l o< I1UUI 












^ 


















B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


( 1 11 * R 1 


1 ,088 


1 ,157 


316 


361 


772 


794 


75C 


778 




939 


923 


'.1.57 




963 


2 


La Plata rfr - Ir 


29E 


287 






298 


2*5 


298 


285 


244 


201 


215 


189 


3 


Lackey iSr -Jr 


241 


242 






241 


242 


241 


242 


176 


148 


236 


197 


4 




27 


24 


27 


24 










27 


24 


27 


24 


5 


Glnflvn Ir 


57 


37 






57 


37 


57 


37 


57 


37 


57 


37 


6 


Hughesvillo Jr 


53 


47 






53 


47 


53 


47 


53 


47 


53 


47 


7 


Bel \lton Colored Sr - Ir 


172 


257 


12C 


165 


52 


92 


54 


93 


1 53 


223 


150 


226 


8 


Pomonkey Colored Sr.-Jr 


239 


263 


169 


172 


70 


91 


48 


71 


229 


243 


219 


243 


9 


Dohchkster 


1 ,053 


962 


199 


181 


85-1 


781 


-Off 


72C 


sit; 


771 


764 




10 


East New Market Sr.-Jr 


45 


34 


15 


10 


3( 


24 


3C 


24 


35 


25 


32 


33 


11 




4£ 


44 


9 


12 


4C 


32 


41 


32 


39 


43 


38 


44 


12 




75 


72 






79 


72 


79 


72 


79 


69 


61 


50 


13 


Cambridge Sr.-Jr 


265 


278 






265 


278 


217 


223 


195 


170 


155 


135 


1 ! 


Hurlock Sr.-Jr 


150 


124 


88 


67 


62 


57 


59 


57 


118 


105 


97 


79 


15 


Cambridge Jr 


191 


151 






191 


151 


191 


151 


191 


151 


191 


151 


16 


Mace's Lane Colored Sr.-Jr 


274 


259 


87 


92 


187 


167 


17C 


161 


189 


208 


190 


189 




2,420 


2,368 


1 ,422 


1 ,283 


998 


1 ,085 


943 


1,011 


1 ,27S 


1.125 


1.767 


1 ,60 4 


18 


Frederick Sr.-Jr 


•ill 


701 


204 


173 


437 


528 


434 


521 


512 


5081 364 


309 


19 




30S 


266 


195 


151 


114 


115 


91 


87 


163 


128 


211 


181 


20 




103 


85 


65 


53 


38 


32 


38 


32 


59 


36 


86 


68 


21 




272 


267 


169 


166 


lo:j 


101 


75 


63 


138 


107 


181 


180 


22 


Brunswick Sr.-Jr 


19S 


214 


112 


119 


87 


95 


86 


94 


108 


81 


87 


90 


23 


Walkersville Sr.-Jr 


148 


140 


46 


47 


102 


93 


102 


93 


86 


92 


135 


120 


24 




465 


422 


465 


422 












• • 


465 


422 


25 


Liberty Jr 


89 


76 


89 


76 










41 


21 


89 


76 


26 


Lincoln Colored Sr.-Jr 


194 


197 


77 


76 


117 


12i 


117 


12i 


171 


152 


149 


158 


27 Garrett 


886 


916 


886 


915 






12 


1 


338 


3/6 


687 


641 




Northern Garrett Co. Sr.-Jr 


38" 


384 


385 


384 






12 


1 


116 


145 


300 


274 


29 


Southern Garrett Co., Sr.-Jr 


501 


532 


501 


531 










222 


231 


387 


367 


30 Harford 


2 ,159 


2,209 


1,377 


1 ,362 
199 


782 


847 


691 


705 


961 


919 


1,898 


1,750 


31 




324 


317 


224 


99 


119 


92 


98 


119 


121 


291 


240 


32 


Bel Air Sr.-Jr 


913 


887 575 


540 


339 


346 


260 


257 


373 


392 


846 


753 


33 


North Harford Sr.-Jr 


399 


458 


261 


291 


138 


167 


133 


156 


128 


100 


306 330 


34 




244 


288 


149 


176 


95 


112 


95 


91 


132 


113 


194 


204 


35 


Havre de Grace Col. Sr.-Jr 


174 


158 


102 


93 


72 


65 


72 


65 


104 


92 


166 


137 


36 


Central Colored Sr.-Jr 


105 


101 


66 


63 


39 


38 


39 


38 


105 


101 


95 


86 


37 Howard 


1,047 


1,024 


545 


491 


460 


486 


461 


478 


923 


857 


831 


723 


38 


Howard Co. Sr 


271 


300 






229 


253 


199 


231 


200 


188 


147 


107 


39 




173 


161 


97 


62 


76 


99 


76 


98 


145 


139 


132 


112 


40 




134 


136 


134 


136 










134 


136 


134 


136 


41 


Ellicott City Jr 


162 


167 


109 


126 


53 


41 


53 


41 


162 


167 


162 


167 


42 


Clarksville Jr 


96 


71 


64 


51 


32 


20 


32 


20 


96 


71 


96 


71 


43 


Harriet Tubman Colored Sr.-Jr 


211 


189 


141 


116 


70 


73 


101 


88 


186 


156 


160 


130 


44 Kent 


616 


544 


314 


276 


302 


268 


301 


268 


545 


486 


459 


431 


45 


Galena Sr.-Jr 


94 


85 


54 


51 


40 


34 


40 


34 


86 


76 


77 


73 


46 




263 


206 


159 


118 


104 


88 


104 


88 


223 


176 


191 


145 


47 




100 


88 






100 


88 


99 


88 


85 


73 


71 


68 


48 




159 


165 


ioi 


107 


58 


58 


58 


58 


151 


161 


120 


145 


49 


Montgomery 


6,579 


6,591 
^44 


2,429 


2,332 


4 ,141 


4,253 


3 


3 ,065 


4 ,102 


3,748 


5,842 


4,906 


50 


Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr 


785 


784 


843 


571 


619 


582 


506 


715 


425 


51 




1017 


983 






1 ,013 


983 


774 


743 


798 


599 


852 


357 


52 




'l21 


132 


60 


R7 
0/ 


61 


00 


61 


65 


7-5 


89 


106 


119 


53 




619 


545 


281 


231 


338 


314 


288 


281 


318 


339 


508 


323 


54 




260 


275 


125 


132 


135 


143 


135 


143 


156 


151 


204 


212 


55 




380 


401 






377 


398 


361 


373 


228 


223 


206 


210 


56 




162 


150 


90 


89 


72 


60 


68 


56 


106 


96 


99 


102 


57 




568 


612 


568 


612 










322 


313 


567 


612 


58 




434 


402 


434 


402 










207 


182 


433 


402 


59 




368 


407 






368 


407 


367 


407 


229 


228 


367 


406 


60 




477 


423 






477 


423 


477 


423 


276 


219 


476 


423 


61 




450 


410 


334 


309 


116 


101 


116 


100 


255 


228 


450 


410 


62 




537 


490 


537 


490 










323 


266 


537 


490 


63 




124 


185 






123 


1841 


87 


123 


81 


101 


60 


90 


64 




277 


332 






277 


332| 


277 


332 


14o! 


2,;s 


262 


325 i 



Maryland State Department of Education 243 



County Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1954 



French 






Agr 
culti 


i- 
ire 


Industria 


1 


Home 
Economic 


8 






Vf nolo 


A pt_ A rts 








Gen. 


v oc. 


Ar 


a 


tt 
Edu. 


Gei 


i. 


Voc. 


u je 




Educ 










rafts 



B 


G 


3 


G 


B 


B 


3 


Q 


B 


3 


Q 


G 


3 


G 


3 


G 


3 


G 


3 


G 


1 


68 


69 






53 


120 


551 


40 






562 


74 


118 


307 


I 019 


1017 


715 


737 


197 


243 


2 




• • 








60 


180 








170 




60 


1 1 1 


*298 




181 


166 






3 


34 


10 










120 








147 




24 


46 


204 


zoo 


155 


142 


67 


62 


4 














27 
















27 


24 










5 










■ ■ 












37 








57 


37 


57 


37 






5 










53 












47 








53 


It 


53 


47 






7 


19 


34 








31 


88 


40 






51 


36 


13 


42 


163 


222 


133 


188 


58 


1 i 5 


g 


15 


25 








29 


136 








110 


38 


21 


75 


217 


194 


136 


157 


72 


66 


9 


35 


60 








143 


500 




28 




467 


59 


182 


271 


980 




558 


487 


312 


297 


10 


1 


9 








15 










34 








45 


34 










11 


4 










30 


















49 


44 










12 














70 








64 




'9 


11 


79 


65 










13 


2 


15 








• • 


139 




28 




137 




124 


160 


211 


239 


99 


98 


121 


146 


14 


6 


11 








31 


134 








93 




34 


43 


149 


122 


95 


85 






15 




• • 








■ ■ 












• • 






191 


151 


191 


151 


191 


151 


16 


22 


25 








67 


157 








139 


59 


15 


57 


256 


235 


173 


153 






17 


41 


136 






29 


344 


1,207 


89 






1,201 


56 


467 


572 


2,379 


2,290 


1,716 


1,734 


1,039 


938 


18 


23 


66 








128 


241 








277 




193 


252 


637 


684 


267 


277 


178 


110 


19 


1 


19 








85 


137 


89 






62 


10 


61 


64 


298 


244 


163 


186 


156 


169 


20 












25 


;s 








85 








94 


85 


103 


85 






21 


5 


20 








47 


167 








158 




gl 


123 


270 


256 


195 


212 


153 


166 


22 


4 


16 










98 








111 




77 


78 


185 


189 


129 


164 


45 


43 


23 


8 


15 






29 


59 










123 




22 


26 


148 


140 


111 


115 


17 




24 














240 








212 








465 


422 


465 


422 


465 


422 


25 














89 








76 


• • 






89 


76 


89 


76 






26 














157 








97 


46 


33 


29 


193 


194 


194 


197 


25 


28 


27 


17 


5/ 


26 


18 




193 


670 








531 


135 


123 


313 


744 


577 


662 


714 


289 


327 


28 


1 


9 








108 


313 








224 


64 


29 


85 


339 


241 


286 


303 






29 


16 


48 


26 


18 




85 


357 








307 


71 


94 


228 


405 


336 


376 


411 


289 


327 


30 


70 


no 
98 








202 


1 496 
'l86 


1 


40 


49 


1 543 




193 


539 


1 959 


1 884 


1 ,695 


1 ,736 


1 157 


1 ,196 


31 


3 


11 








• • 








*170 




55 


83 


*309 


'297 


'250 


'247 


'l66 


'l52 


32 


47 


51 








66 


781 


i 






684 




34 


208 


785 


653 


685 


612 


567 


582 


33 


10 


15 








136 


166 




• ■ 


49 


274 




40 


124 


374 


441 


314 


411 


231 


229 


34 


10 


21 










120 




40 




191 




56 


103 


212 


234 


167 


207 


157 


198 


35 














138 








123 




g 


21 


174 


158 


174 


158 


36 


35 


36 














105 








101 








105 


101 


105 


101 






37 


42 


51 






31 


159 


723 






1 


746 




181 


310 


1,007 


927 


795 


850 


83 


113 


38 


21 


26 








58 


151 








135 




123 


207 


231 


206 


90 


176 


83 


113 


39 


6 


12 








38 


66 








95 




24 


47 


173 


159 


131 


127 






40 














134 








136 








134 


135 


134 


136 






41 














162 








167 








162 


167 


162 


167 






42 




• • 






■ ■ 


■ • 


96 








71 








96 


71 


96 


71 






43 


is 


13 






31 


63 


114 






I 


142 




34 


56 


211 


189 


182 


173 






44 






£ 


15 




104 


453 








346 


94 


107 


92 


599 


516 


506 


495 


118 


86 


45 












• • 


83 








51 


20 


16 


12 


94 


85 


75 


83 


54 


51 


46 








15 




61 


172 








131 


• • 


51 


54 


246 


178 


2lC 


176 


64 


35 


47 












• • 


84 








57 


16 


40 


26 


10C 


88 


62 


71 






48 












43 


114 








107 


58 






15S 


165 


159 


165 






49 


169 


355 


345 


410 


7t 


11c 


4 687 


256 


50! 




3 742 


194 


639 


1 565 


5 781 


5 496 


3 306 


3 877 


2 132 


2 360 


50 


82 


180 


13? 


163 








9C 


44 




'l34 


3S 


131 


351 


*68c 


'706 


146 


243 


41 


97 


51 


53 


95 


153 


183 


• • 


• • 


628 


106 


165 




268 


48 


230 


571 


543 


297 


146 


234 


126 


214 


52 


8 


18 






27 


3t 


37 








81 




18 


37 


118 


128 


66 


76 






53 




■ • 


14 


20 






377 


12 


134 




292 


37 


55 


196 


570 


469 


388 


471 


301 


253 


54 


17 


32 


11 


14 






174 


4 






166 


19 


60 


114 


248 


251 


176 


169 


139 


146 


55 






28 


30 


35 


4i 


248 


3 






206 




89 


138 


370 


395 


171 


246 


138 


180 


56 


3 


5 








41 


112 








76 


33 


40 


63 


158 


140 


91 


106 






57 














410 








418 








561 


607 


414 


431 


51 


102 


5S 














362 








345 








426 


400 


353 


340 


247 


194 


59 














346 








312 








360 


399 


193 


259 


107 


150 


60 














457 








419 








476 


421 


232 


322 


234 


259 


61 














382 








324 








427 


400 


362 


32S 


311 


301 


62 














48C 








418 








537 


490 


411 


381 


339 


330 


63 


'6 


25 






16 




3 


2C 


157 




21 


22 


16 


95 


67 


138 


36 


57 


12 


28 


64 














221 


21 






262 








23S 


255 


127 


2141 86 


106 



244 Eighty-Eighth Annual Report 

TABLE XXVII— Continued— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland 



County 
Name of High School 



1 Prince George's 

2 Northwestern Sr 

3 Bladensburg Sr.-Jr 

4 Frederick Sasscer Sr.-Jr 

5 Suitland Sr.-Jr 

6 Surrattsville Sr.-Jr 

Laurel Sr.-Jr 

Gwvrin Park Sr.-Jr 

Oxon Hill Sr -Jr 

Bladensburg Jr 

Hyattsville Jr 

Mt. Rainier Jr 

Maryland Park Jr 

Green belt Jr 

Douglas Colored Sr.-Jr 

Fairmont Heights Colored Sr.-Jr. 

Westwood Colored Jr 

Lincoln Colored Jr 

Lakeland Colored Jr 



20 Queen Anne's. 



Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 

Centreville Sr.-Jr 

Stevensville Sr.-Jr 

Kennard Colored Sr.-Jr. 



25 St. Mary's 

26 Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr 

27 Great Mills Sr.-Jr 

28 Leonardtown Jr 

29 Banneker Colored Sr.-Jr. 

30 Jarboesville Colored Sr.-Jr. 

31 Somerset 

32 Washington Sr.-Jr 

33 Marion Sr.-Jr 

34 Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

35 Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

36 EweU Jr 

37 Greenwood Colored Sr.-Jr. 

38 Woodson Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 

39 Talbot 

40 Easton Sr.-Jr 

41 St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 

42 Moton Colored Sr.-Jr 

43 Washington 

44 Hagerstown Sr 

45 Williamsport Sr.-Jr 

46 Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

47 Hancock Sr.-Jr 

48 Boonsboro Sr.-Jr 

49 Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

50 Maugansville Sr.-Jr 

51 South Potomac Jr 

52 Woodland Way Jr 

53 Washington Jr 

54 North Street Colored 



r.-Jr. 



55 Wicomico 

56 Wicomico Sr 

57 Mardela Sr.-Jr 

58 Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

59 Hebron Sr.-Jr 

60 Salisbury Colored Sr.-Jr. 

61 Worcester 



Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Buckingham Sr.-Jr 

Ocean City Sr.-Jr 

Worcester Colored Sr.-Jr. 



Total 
























Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Social 


Science 


Mathe- 


La 




nt 










Stu 














B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


7 873 


7 ,908 


5 ,216 


5 ,137 


2 ,647 


2 ,768 


2 ,544 


2 ,629 


3 456 


3 229 


6 510 


5 776 


237 


902 


1 ',022 




*896 


1 021 


802 


'901 


'650 


*486 


674 


361 


161 


881 


'67-1 


108 


92 


771 


'580 


755 


555 


480 


404 


392 


224 


48 


248 


269 


222 


228 


25 


41 


25 


41 


1 10 


117 


170 


159 




886 


914 


452 


391 


434 


523 


427 


511 


462 


389 


700 


503 


27 


235 


238 


153 


148 


82 


90 


79 


90 


126 


85 


210 


180 




306 


327 


194 


187 


112 


140 


112 


140 


185 


173 


269 


242 




229 


237 


181 


174 


47 


63 


42 


44 


120 


103 


175 


179 




441 


398 


267 


224 


174 


174 


174 


163 


186 


171 


387 


295 


i 


689 


673 


689 


673 










161 


152 


689 


673 




548 


564 


548 


564 










154 


167 


548 


564 




397 


454 


397 


454 










125 


156 


397 


454 




496 


411 


496 


411 










109 


102 


481 


405 




541 


531 


541 


531 










160 


174 


541 


531 




276 


329 


170 


193 


106 


136 


84 


130 


131 


175 


225 


280 




55 S 


658 


558 


658 






44 


54 


178 


267 


412 


517 




53 


56 


53 


56 










14 


17 


53 


56 




82 


62 


82 


82 














82 


62 




105 


91 


105 


91 










105 


91 


105 


91 




636 


646 


125 


122 


510 


525 


472 


463 


477 


472 


496 


486 




138 


151 






137 


152 


126 


150 


89 


103 


94 


108 




226 


225 


49 


51 


177 


174 


150 


115 


185 


161 


161 


149 




101 


103 






101 


103 


101 


102 


79 


77 


70 


62 




171 


167 


76 


71 


95 


96 


95 


96 


124 


131 


171 


167 




705 


734 


224 


240 


476 


492 


478 


490 


604 


575 


624 


578 


63 


185 


199 


97 


105 


83 


94 


86 


92 


168 


151 


159 


129 


21 


283 


296 






283 


296 


282 


296 


270 


253 


228 


212 


42 


34 


35 


34 


35 










34 


35 


34 


35 




131 


152 


93 


100 


38 


50 


38 


50 


67 


91 


131 


150 




72 


52 






72 


52 


72 


52 


65 


45 


72 


52 




798 


768 


465 


452 


333 


317 


381 


346 


632 


616 


618 


591 




173 


142 


100 


87 


73 


55 


87 


54 


125 


104 


110 


94 




57 


64 


35 


38 


22 


26 


22 


26 


49 


54 


44 


55 




186 


192 


114 


118 


72 


74 


72 


74 


151 


157 


182 


156 




36 


39 


16 


22 


20 


17 


20 


17 


36 


39 


26 


34 




18 


14 






18 


14 


18 


14 


18 


14 


18 


14 




215 


216 


129 


134 


86 


82 


86 


82 


155 


164 


144 


153 




113 


101 


71 


53 


42 


49 


76 


79 


98 


84 


94 


85 




772 


770 


333 


300 


429 


464 


408 


446 


705 


648 


669 


629 


23 


377 


415 


180 


168 


195 


247 


190 


236 


338 


330 


361 


361 


18 


163 


141 






163 


141 


163 


141 


143 


111 


126 


112 


5 


232 


214 


153 


132 


71 


76 


55 


69 


224 


207 


182 


156 




3,405 


3,267 


977 


939 


2,428 


2,328 


2,218 


2,196 


2,704 


2,364 


2,593 


2,261 


73 


744 


793 






744 


793 


612 


663 


417 


427 


242 


176 


18 


278 


241 


164 


113 


114 


128 


105 


157 


233 


189 


196 


144 


5 


269 


231 


167 


146 


102 


85 


98 


79 


226 


203 


210 


178 


6 


181 


202 


74 


81 


107 


121 


107 


121 


158 


170 


135 


152 




501 


425 


107 


89 


394 


336 


330 


317 


473 


351 


407 


317 


25 


179 


205 


82 


85 


97 


120 


96 


114 


176 


172 


146 


136 




50 


47 


19 


28 


31 


19 


31 


19 


50 


47 


50 


47 




386 


343 






386 


343 


386 


343 


382 


311 


386 


343 


"a 


428 


347 






428 


347 


428 


347 


418 


325 


432 


348 


10 


316 


356 


316 


356 










98 


104 


316 


356 


5 


73 


77 


48 


41 


25 


36 


25 


36 


73 


65 


73 


64 




1 209 


1 185 


86 


73 


1 123 


1 112 


983 


947 


985 


904 


842 


764 


129 


675 


'688 






'675 


'688 


560 


569 


570 


531 


491 


449 


97 


79 


69 


io 


9 


69 


60 


46 


39 


54 


50 


60 


46 




76 


74 






76 


74 


76 


74 


76 


74 


58 


46 




51 


37 


24 


12 


27 


25 


28 


25 


40 


32 


24 


12 




328 


317 


52 


52 


276 


265 


273 


240 


245 


217 


209 


211 


32 


931 


917 


577 


540 


354 


377 


354 


376 


609 


642 


719 


731 


28 


150 


136 


82 


82 


68 


54 


68 


53 


139 


115 


104 


100 


12 


172 


171 


101 


91 


71 


80 


71 


80 


121 


110 


139 


130 


10 


216 


224 


129 


129 


87 


95 


87 


95 


112 


137 


146 


165 




85 


85 


45 


48 


40 


37 


40 


37 


78 


78 


61 


65 




308 


301 


220 


190 


88 


111 


88 


111 


159 


202 


269 


271 


6 



* Includes the following number of girls taking Vocational Agriculture: Frederick, Thurmont Sr.-Jr.— 2; Howard, Howard 
County Sr.— 1; Worcester, Snow Hill Sr.-Jr— 12. 



Maryland State Department of Education 245 



County Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1954 











Agri- 




Home 


























culture 


Industrial 


Economics 




















French 






















Physical 




Art. Arte 








Spanish 




* 




ft 






Subjects 


Education 






and 


Crafts 












Gen. 


Voc. 


A 


"ts 


Edu. 


G< 


n. 


Voc. 



















B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 



1 


197 


207 


395 


320 


137 


183 


5,403 


152 


507 


34 


1,797 


426 


735 


2,080 


6,774 


6,401 


4,461 


4,718 


3,871 


3 ,626 


2 


56 


49 


153 


91 






453 


12 






213 


67 


146 


653 


628 


559 


182 


276 


86 


130 


3 


28 


30 


89 


48 






256 


2 


380 


16 


86 


186 


116 


355 


539 


375 


120 


126 


144 


72 


4 






16 


25 




57 


1 is 








127 




58 


117 


230 


239 


134 


118 


106 


70 


5 


22 


25 


55 


32 






613 


138 


10 




400 


16 


181 


408 


749 


631 


523 


543 


503 


428 


6 


27 


26 










201 








184 




29 


91 


196 


171 


141 


165 


120 


103 


7 


33 


37 


13 


35 






128 








120 




56 


99 


295 


319 


237 


267 


66 


67 


8 


18 


10 




3 




47 


136 








137 


23 


27 


76 


210 


196 


168 


192 


68 


57 


9 


2 


3 


ei 


58 






327 








221 


50 


88 


116 


390 


316 


183 


190 


28 


37 


10 














689 








673 








689 


673 


f',S9 


673 


689 


673 


11 














548 








564 








508 


509 


305 


352 


314 


334 


12 














397 








453 








397 


453 


345 


330 


276 


333 


13 














481 








405 








485 


394 


302 


358 


376 


205 


14 














541 








531 








541 


531 


360 


349 


381 


364 


15 


11 


27 






137 


79 










136 


59 


15 


39 


253 


260 


158 


136 


174 


199 


16 






8 


28 






380 




ii? 


is 


456 


25 


19 


126 


424 


566 


374 


434 


405 


436 


17 






























53 


56 


53 


56 


53 


56 


18 






























82 


62 


82 


62 


82 


62 


19 














105 








91 








105 


91 


105 


91 






20 


27 


52 


19 


22 


55 


130 


485 






9 


428 


53 


53 


156 


626 


612 


362 


398 


98 


96 


21 


12 


19 








49 


113 








110 




22 


45 


134 


141 


81 


97 






22 


8 


8 


19 


22 




81 


178 






9 


153 


17 


10 


72 


220 


213 


110 


134 


98 


96 


23 


2 


12 










93 








61 




21 


39 


101 


91 










24 


5 


13 






55 




101 








104 


36 






171 


167 


17i 


167 






25 


16 


15 






32 


147 


47 








395 


57 


44 


108 


612 


612 


540 


571 


169 


162 


26 












93 










163 




20 


70 


182 


185 


117 


154 






27 


i6 


15 


















140 




22 


31 


265 


242 


186 


180 


144 


145 


28 






























34 


35 


34 


35 






29 










32 


54 










ii 


43 


2 


*7 


131 


150 


131 


150 






30 














47 








21 


14 










72 


52 


25 


17 


31 


51 


63 






38 


25 


268 








530 




129 


155 


667 


469 


414 


448 


34 


36 


32 


13 


16 






38 


25 










79 




35 


37 


171 


140 










33 


3 


3 






















31 


38 


54 


64 


19 


24 






34 


20 


30 


















186 




63 


80 


174 




176 


186 






35 


































16 


22 


16 


22 


36 






































18 


14 


37 


15 


i4 










155 








164 








155 


164 


90 


115 






38 














113 








101 








113 


101 


113 


101 






39 


53 


67 






15 


130 


468 








457 


20 


69 


180 


618 


577 


449 


396 


245 


220 


40 


19 


17 








63 


242 








245 




39 


108 


310 


289 


180 


168 


180 


168 


41 


17 


22 








19 


83 








80 




20 


41 


84 


80 


84 


80 


65 


52 


42 


17 


28 






is 


48 


143 








132 


20 


10 


31 


224 


208 


185 


148 






43 


60 


117 


58 


105 


60 


326 


2,402 


58 


317 




2,138 


197 


279 


1,006 


3,357 


3,107 


2 ,594 


2,669 


1,055 
61 


978 


44 


32 


58 


58 


105 




55 


180 


4 


317 




213 


76 


116 


659 


744 


748 


126 


288 


48 


45 


8 


10 








75 


182 








156 




36 


108 


270 


226 


231 


207 






46 


5 


6 








45 


138 








156 




59 


64 


242 


198 


217 


247 


ii4 


100 


47 


4 


14 










156 








128 


28 


44 


48 


176 


176 


135 


186 






48 


9 


16 








83 


368 








282 


44 


14 


59 


497 


388 


476 


406 






49 


1 


7 






4i 


37 


156 


54 






49 


49 


10 


34 


179 


205 


156 


165 






50 










19 


31 


19 








47 








50 


47 


50 


47 






51 














386 








343 








386 


343 


386 


343 


346 


320 


52 














428 








347 








424 


344 


428 


347 


273 


228 


53 














316 








340 








316 


355 


316 


356 


213 


241 


54 


i 


6 










73 








77 






34 


73 


77 


73 


77 


48 


41 


55 


22 


29 








120 


823 








780 




200 


293 


724 


684 


702 


708 


274 


250 


56 


19 


24 








58 


453 








354 




157 


209 


397 


367 


314 


364 


01 




57 


3 


5 










79 








69 




12 


14 






73 


62 


73 


62 


58 














52 








55 






15 






70 


59 


70 


59 


59 
60 


























5 


8 






43 


46 


50 


37 












62 


239 








302 




26 


47 


327 


317 


202 


177 






61 
62 


14 


18 






124 


84 


628 


25 






601 


44 


222 


292 


817 


769 


598 


606 


55 


53 














109 








93 




45 


42 


144 


128 


90 


94 






63 












59 


127 








134 




36 


65 


163 


156 


101 


91 






64 


10 


10 






57 




131 








125 




77 


86 


158 


167 


136 


148 


55 


53 


65 


4 


8 










55 


25 






32 




23 


31 


67 


58 










66 










67 


25 


206 








217 


44 


41 


68 


285 


260 


271 


273 







t Includes the following number of girls and boys taking Diversified Occupations: Baltimore, Kenwood Sr. — 17, 
boys, 10 girls; Dorchester, Cambridge Sr.-Jr.— 28 boys; Montgomery, Bethesda-Chevy Case Sr.— 27 boys, 17 girls; 
Montgomery Blair Sr.— 61 boys, 31 girls; Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr.— 11 boys; Prince George's, Suitland Sr.-Jr.— S 
boys, 2 girls. 

t Includes the following number of girls taking Industrial Education: Montgomery, Carver Colored Sr.— 45; Prince 
George's, Bladensburg Sr.-Jr.— 3. 



INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 234-239 
Accreditation and certification, 30-35 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 142-143 

Expenditures, 222 

Per cent for, 140-141 

Superintendents, 2, 5-10, 217, 222 
Adult education, 159, 162-165, 225 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 162-165 

Enrollment, 88-89, 99 

Each high school, 240-245 

Failures and withdrawals, 109 

Federal aid, 159 -161, 165 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 90 
Aid from State and or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution by 
type of fund, 136-139, 197, 218-219, 233 

State teachers colleges, 187-188, 197, 199 

Vocational education, 159, 162, 165, 197, 219 

Vocational rehabilitation, 193, 197 
Appropriations 

County, 136-139, 172-173, 197, 220 

State, 136-139, 197, 220 
Art, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89, 100 

Each high school, 240-245 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

Teachers, 90 
Assessable basis, 175-177 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 214 

Average daily, 213 

Each high school, 234-239 

Per cent of, 215 

Summer school pupils, 191 

Teachers at summer school, 111 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 66 

Auxiliary agencies (see Other school services) 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 102 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 197, 218 
Belonging, average number, 212 

Each high school, 234-239 

Per teacher, 71 
Birth rates, 67-69 

Board of Education, State, 2, 197-198 
Boards of Education, County, 5-10 
Bonds outstanding, school, 169 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 144, 146 
High. 145, 147 
Expenditures 

All schools, 223 
Elementary, 229, 231 
High, 230, 232 
Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

Nonpublic, 206-207 
Public, 204-205 
Graduates, high school, 80-87, 234-239 
Budget(s) 

Baltimore City, county, local, 136-139,172-173 

State public school, 197 

State teachers colleges, 197, 199 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 

Number of, 131-134, 203 

Value of school, per pupil, 170-171 
Business education 

Adult, 163-165 

Enrollment, 88-89, 101, 159-161, 165 

Each high school, 240-245 
Failures and withdrawals, 108 
Schools offering, 90, 240-245 
Teachers, 90 



c 

Capital outlay, school, 141 

By site, building, equipment, 228 
Certificates held by county teachers, 112-116 
Certification and accreditation, 30 35 
Classes 

Evening school, 163-165 

Size of, 71 

Special for handicapped, 64-65 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 191 
Clerks, county schools, 217 
Colleges 

High school graduates 

of 1953 entering, 82-87 
of 1954 entering State teachers colleges, 
81,234-239 
Junior, 183, 185-186 

State teachers, 5, 181-185, 187-188, 197, 
199-202 

Trainine teachers appointed in Maryland 
counties, 110 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 129 

Transportation of pupils, 154-158 
Construction accounts, State teachers colleges, 

200-202 
Core program, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89 

Each high school, 240-245 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

Teachers, 90 
Cost per pupil 

Administration, 142-143 

Analyzed for elementary and high, 144-147 

By type of school, 143 

Transported, 154, 157 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors,5-10 
Courses in individual high schools, 234-239 
Crippled children, services for, 64-66 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 142-147 
Expenditures 

All schools. 221 

By source funds, 138-139 
By type of school, 229-232 



D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 58 
Days in session, 58, 215 
Debt service 

1953-54, 170, 172-173, 227 

Tax rate for, 174 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 159-161, 165 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 103 

Schools offering, 90 

Teachers, 90 

E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 135, 217 
Emergency certificates, 112-116 
Employment of high school graduates, 82-87 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89, 91 

Each high school, 240-245 
Failures and withdrawals, 108-109 
Schools offering, 90, 240-245 
Teachers, 90 
Enrollment 

Adult, 163, 165 

Atypical children, 66 

Elementary, 59, 61-63, 72-77, 204-211 

Grade or year, 72-77 

High school 

Course, each school, 234-239 
Growth in, 152-153 
Subjects, 88-89, 91-101, 103 
Each school, 240-245 



246 



Index 



247 



E — (Continued) 

Year, 73-77 

Each school, 234-239 
Increase in, 60-63 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 59, 61 63, 
206-211 

Number different pupils, 60-63, 204 205 
Public, 59- 63, 72-77, 204-205 
State teachers colleges, 183-185 
Subjects, 88-89, 91-101, 103 

Each school, 240-245 
Summary, 59-63 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 191 
Equalization fund, 138-139, 218 
Equivalence examinations, 191 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 163, 165 
Expenditures, 159, 162, 165, 225 
Expenditures, 221-233 

(see also Administration, Instruction, Opera- 
tion, Maintenance, Fixed charges, Other 
school services, Payments to adjoining 
counties, Current expenses, Debt service, 
Capital outlay) 
Elementary schools, 229, 231 
Evening schools, 159, 162, 165, 225 
Health. 225 
High schools, 230, 232 
Libraries, 223 
Rehabilitation, 193, 198 
Salaries 

All schools, 223 
Elementary, 229, 231 
High, 152-153, 230, 232 
Vocational, 159-162, 165 
State teachers colleges, 187-188, 197, 199 
Total, by major classifications, 197, 221 
Transoortation, 154, 156-157, 225 
Vocational, Federal, 159-162 165, 219 

F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Fall enrollment, 59, 72-77 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 159-165, 197, 219 
Administration and supervision, 165 
Salaries of teachers, 160-162, 165 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 187-188, 197, 199 
Financial statements 

State public schools, 197, 218-233 

State teachers colleges, 197, 199-202 
First grade nonpromotions, 79 
Fixed charges, 140-141, 226 
French, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89, 98 

Each high school, 240-245 

Failures and withdrawals, 108 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

Teachers, 90 

G 

Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 102 
Grade enrollment, 72-77 
Graduates 

High school, 80-87 

Entering State teachers colleges, 81, 83-84, 
86-87 

From each school, 234-239 
Occupations of, 82-87 
State teachers colleges, 181-182 
Guidance, teachers of, 90 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 64, 197 

Home instruction, 64, 204-205 

Hospital schools, 64, 204-205 

Institutions for, 64, 66 

Opportunities for education of, 64-66 

Receipts from State for, 64, 197, 218 

Transportation of, 64 
Health expenditures, all schools, 225 
Hearing, conservation of, 64-66 



H — (Continued) 

High school equivalence examinations, 191 
High schools 

Aid for, 218 

Disbursements, 218, 230, 232 

Individual, 234-239, 240-245 

Supervision, 135, 217 
Home economics 

Adult, 159, 163 165 

Enrollment, 88-89, 99 

Each high school, 240-245 

Federal aid, 159-162, 165 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

Teachers, 90 
Home instruction of pupils, 64, 204-205 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 64, 204-205 



I 

Income payments, per capita, 178-179 
Income tax, per capita, 180 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 172-173 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 36 47 

Cost per pupil, 144-147 

Expenditures, 229-232 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 223 
State teachers colleges, 187-188 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 188 



J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, 217 
Junior colleges, 183, 185-186 

K 

Kindergartens, 73, 75-77 
Nonpublic, 206-211 

L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 13-14 

Length of session, 58, 215 

Letter of transmittal, 12 

Levies, county, 172-173 

Librarians, county, 4-5 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 195-196, 223 

Public, 4-5, 195 

School, 196 
Library extension, 4, 48-53, 194-196 
Lip reading classes, 65, 165 
Lunch program, school, 166-167, 219, 225 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 144-147 

Expenditures, 224, 229-232 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Materials of instruction (see Books and instruction- 
al materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89, 96-97 

Each high school, 240-245 

Failures and withdrawals, 108-109 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

Teachers, 90 
Medical examinations, 218 
Men teachers, 130, 216 
Mentally handicapped children, 65 
Minimum program, State, 233 
Minutes, State Board, 15-24 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89, 100 

Each high school, 240-245 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 102 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

Teachers, 90 



248 



Index 



N 

Night schools (see Evening schools, Adult educa- 
tion) 

Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 78-79 
First grade, 79 

Subject, high schools, 104 109 
Each subject, 108-109 
One or more subjects, 104-107 
Number belonging, 212 

Each high school, 234-239 

Per teacher, 71 
Number different pupils, 60-63, 204-205 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 66 

Having one teacher, 128-129, 203 

Nonpublic, 59, 206-211 

Public, 59, 203 

Elementary, 128-129, 131-132, 203 
High, 133-134, 203 

o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 82-87 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 129 

Number belonging in, 128 

Number of, 128, 203 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 144-147 

Expenditures, 224, 229-232 

Per cent current expense budget, 140 141 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 102 
Other school services 

Cost per pupil for, 144-147 

Expenditures for, 225, 229-232 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 

P 

Parent-teacher associations, 190 

Parochial and private schools, 59, 61-63, 206-211 

Part-payment of salaries, 218 

Payments to adjoining counties, 140-141, 226 

Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 

Physical education and health, 225 

Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 197 

Enrollment, 88-89, 100 

Each high school, 240-245 

Schools offering, 90, 240-245 

Teachers, 90 

Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 64-66 
Preparation, teachers, 117-119 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 5 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 217 
Private and parochial schools, 59, 61-63, 206-211 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 175-176 

School, 170-171 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 5-10 

Supervisors of, 135, 217 
Salaries, 225 

Pupils 

Atypical, 66 

Nonpublic, 59, 61-63, 206-211 
One-teacher schools, 128-129 
Per teacher, 71 
Public school 

Enrollment, 59-63, 204-205 

Number attending, 213 

Number belonging, 212 

Per cent of attendance, 215 
Transported, 154-155 

R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 220 

Federal government, 219 
Evening schools, 162 
Teachers' salaries, 159-162, 165 
Vocational education, 159-162, 165 



R — (Continued) 

State, 218 

Distributed by type of fund, 136-137, 197 
218 

Evening schools, 162 
Total and per cent, 136-137 
Teachers colleges, 187 188, 197, 199 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 3-4, 54-57, 192-193, 
197-198 

Repair, utility men, janitors, 217 
Resignations, teachers, 120-121 
Retarded children, program for, 64-66 
Retirement system for teachers, 5, 189, 197 



s 

Growth of high school, 152-153 
Per cent of school budget, 140-141 
Superintendents', 222 
Supervisors', 223 

Pupil Personnel, 225 
Teachers' 

Average per teacher, 148-151 

Cost per pupil, 144-147 

Supplementary payments, 218 
Total 

Elementary, 229, 231 

High, 152 153, 230, 232 

Vocational, 159-162 
School lunch program, 166-167, 219, 225 
Schools 

For atypical children, 66 

Number of, 59, 128-129, 131-134, 203, 206-211 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89, 94-95 

Each high school, 240 245 
Failures and withdrawals, 108-109 
Schools offering, 90, 240-245 
Teachers, 90 
Session, length of, 58, 215 
Sex of teachers, 130, 216 
Sight conservation classes, 65 
Size of 

Classes, 71 
Schools 

Each high school, 234-239 
Elementary, 128-129, 131-132 
High, 133-134 
Teaching staff, 59, 128 129, 131, 133, 216 
Social studies, high school 

Enrollment, 88-89, 92-93 

Each high school, 240 245 
Failures and withdrawals, 108-109 
Schools offering, 90, 240-245 
Teachers, 90 
Spanish (see French) 
Special classes for handicapped, 64-66 
Special high school teachers, 90 
State 

Aid to schools, 136-139 

Minimum program, 233 
Showing various funds, 197, 218 
Board of Education, 2, 197 

Excerpts from minutes of, 15-24 
Department of Education, 2-4 
Income taxes, 180 
Public school budget, 197-199 
Superintendent's statement, 25-29 
Teachers colleges, 5, 81, 83 -84. 86-87, 181-185, 

187-188, 197, 199, 234-239 
Teachers' retirement system, 5, 189, 197 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Business 

education) 
Subjects studied in high schools, 88-103 

Each high school, 240-245 
Summer school attendance 
County teachers, 111 
Pupils, Baltimore City, 191 
Superintendents, 2, 5-10, 217 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 144-147 
Cost, salaries, expenses, 223 
By type of school, 229-232 



Index 



249 



S— (Continued) 

Names of, 2-4, 5-10 
Number of, 135, 217 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Salaries of, 223, 229-232 
State, 2-4 

T 

Taxable basis, 175-177 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 140-141 

Tax rates, county, 174 

Teacher(s) 

Academic, high school, 90 

Average salary, 148-151 

Certification, 30-35, 112-116 

Colleges, 5, 81, 83-84, 86 87, 181-185, 187-188 , 

197, 199, 234-239 
Growth in number, 152-153 
Number of, 216 

For each high school subject, 90 
In each high school, 234-239 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 66 
Nonpublic, 59, 206-211 
Public, 59, 216 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 191 

Of atypical children, 66 

Preparation, 117-119 

Pupils per, 71 

Resignations, 120-121 

Salaries 

Average, 148-151 

Growth in high school, 152-153 

Supplementary payments, 218 

Sex of, 130, 216 

Special subjects, high schools, 90 

Summary, elementary and high, public and 

nonpublic, 59 
Summer school attendance, 111 
Training instutitions, 181-185, 187-188, 197, 

199 

Turnover of, 120-127 
Teachers' retirement system 

Financial statements, 189, 197 



T — (Continued) 

Staff, 5 

Teachers' contributions to, 189 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 
Adult, 159, 162-165 
Enrollment, 88-89, 99, 160-161 
Each high school, 240-245 
Federal aid, 159-162, 165 
Schools offering, 90, 240-245 
Teachers, 90 

Training centers, State teachers colleges, 183-184 
Transmittal, letter of, 12 
Transportation of pupils, 154-158, 225 

Cost, total and per pupil, 154, 156-157, 225 

Per cent transported, 154-155 

Physically handicapped, 64 
Tuition charges, State teachers colleges, 187 
Turnover in teaching staff, 120-127 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 175-177 

School property, 170-171 
Vocational education, 159-165, 197, 219 

Enrollment 

Day schools, 88-89, 99, 160-161, 240-245 
Evening schools, 162-165 

Federal aid, 159 -162, 197, 219 

State aid, 197 
Vocational guidance, 90, 165 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-4, 54-57, 192-193 

197-198 



w 

Wealth back of each pupil, 177 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 70 

High, 70, 108-109 
Withdrawals of teachers, 120-121 



Y 

Year, length of school, 58, 215 



RECEIVED 

OFH 6 1955 

HALL C. 7 RcJORDS 
ANNAPCUS. M D. 



I 3 1*30 DEbtlSMl 1 




a31^3002oblS'-.l lb 



OWIV. Of MO COLLEGE P»*«